473,899 Members | 3,305 Online
Bytes | Software Development & Data Engineering Community
+ Post

Home Posts Topics Members FAQ

Quad Xeon vs. Dual Itanium

Hi, all.

I need to upgrade my dual Xeon PostgreSQL engine.

Assuming similar memory and disk sub-systems, I am considering a Quad
Xeon system vs. a Dual Itanium for PostgreSQL. I believe that the
PostgreSQL code is written for 32 bit and not optimized for the 64 bit
Itanium cpu. That makes me think that the Xeon system would be a better
choice.

Do any of you have thoughts on:

1. Straight performance capability
2. Price/Performance
I would appreciate any feedback you might have.
....john
---------------------------(end of broadcast)---------------------------
TIP 1: subscribe and unsubscribe commands go to ma*******@postg resql.org

Nov 22 '05
25 9753
On Fri, Feb 13, 2004 at 12:19:39PM -0500, Bruce Momjian wrote:
64-bits isn't faster than 32, and can be slower because of the longer
pointer length, decreasing cache performance. The major advantage to
64-bits is accessing more the 4gb of RAM.


I note, however, that all the Sun experts say you should get your
database applications optimised for 64 bits because you can ship
around more data at a time. I have no clue what they're basing it
on, though.

A

--
Andrew Sullivan | aj*@crankycanuc k.ca
The plural of anecdote is not data.
--Roger Brinner

---------------------------(end of broadcast)---------------------------
TIP 5: Have you checked our extensive FAQ?

http://www.postgresql.org/docs/faqs/FAQ.html

Nov 22 '05 #21
Martha Stewart called it a Good Thing when aj*@crankycanuc k.ca (Andrew Sullivan) wrote:
On Fri, Feb 13, 2004 at 12:19:39PM -0500, Bruce Momjian wrote:
64-bits isn't faster than 32, and can be slower because of the longer
pointer length, decreasing cache performance. The major advantage to
64-bits is accessing more the 4gb of RAM.


I note, however, that all the Sun experts say you should get your
database applications optimised for 64 bits because you can ship
around more data at a time. I have no clue what they're basing it
on, though.


Well, presumably if you are copying values in and out of registers, it
is preferable to use 64 bit registers, thereby shifting around 64 bits
at a time. If that seems underwhelming, well, that might explain
Solaris...
--
If this was helpful, <http://svcs.affero.net/rm.php?r=cbbrow ne> rate me
http://www.ntlug.org/~cbbrowne/emacs.html
"[In 'Doctor' mode], I spent a good ten minutes telling Emacs what I
thought of it. (The response was, 'Perhaps you could try to be less
abusive.')" -- Matt Welsh
Nov 22 '05 #22
Wouldn't you only care about 64-bit Postgres if you wanted to make
shared_buffers bigger than 4G?

Various other posters have commented about the sweet-spot for
shared_buffers being ~ 100-200M (or thereabouts).

So it seems to me that there is nothing to be gained using a 64-bit
binary with the current or previous Pg releases. However, with the new
cache replacement system being used in 7.5devel, the situation *may* be
different (wonder if anyone has tried this out yet?).

regards

Mark
Andrew Sullivan wrote:
On Mon, Feb 09, 2004 at 12:46:58PM -0500, Christopher Browne wrote:

Lots of people have been running it on 64 bit systems for _years_ now.
The Digital Alpha architecture, for instance, was introduced in the
1992, and Sun UltraSPARC in 1995. PostgreSQL has been running well on
these sorts of systems for a lot of years now.


But actually, there are problems with using postgres as a 64 bit
application on Solaris. It works, and it's reliable, but I've never
seen any evidence that it helps anything (and I've looked plenty).

A

---------------------------(end of broadcast)---------------------------
TIP 3: if posting/reading through Usenet, please send an appropriate
subscribe-nomail command to ma*******@postg resql.org so that your
message can get through to the mailing list cleanly

Nov 22 '05 #23
Mark Kirkwood <ma****@paradis e.net.nz> writes:
So it seems to me that there is nothing to be gained using a 64-bit
binary with the current or previous Pg releases. However, with the new
cache replacement system being used in 7.5devel, the situation *may* be
different (wonder if anyone has tried this out yet?).


Quite honestly, I suspect we may be wasting our time hacking the
Postgres buffer replacement algorithm at all. There are a bunch of
reasons why the PG shared buffer arena should never be more than a
small fraction of physical RAM, and under those conditions the cache
replacement algorithm that will matter is the kernel's, not ours.

I stand ready to be proven wrong, of course ...

regards, tom lane

---------------------------(end of broadcast)---------------------------
TIP 2: you can get off all lists at once with the unregister command
(send "unregister YourEmailAddres sHere" to ma*******@postg resql.org)

Nov 22 '05 #24
On Fri, Feb 13, 2004 at 10:46:18PM -0500, Tom Lane wrote:
Quite honestly, I suspect we may be wasting our time hacking the
Postgres buffer replacement algorithm at all. There are a bunch of
reasons why the PG shared buffer arena should never be more than a
small fraction of physical RAM, and under those conditions the cache
replacement algorithm that will matter is the kernel's, not ours.


Well, unless the Postgres cache is more efficient than the OS's, no?.
You could then use the nocache filesystem option, and just let
Postgres handle the whole thing. Of course, that's a pretty big
unless, and not one that I'm volunteering to make go away!

A

--
Andrew Sullivan

---------------------------(end of broadcast)---------------------------
TIP 8: explain analyze is your friend

Nov 22 '05 #25
Tom Lane wrote:
Mark Kirkwood <ma****@paradis e.net.nz> writes:
So it seems to me that there is nothing to be gained using a 64-bit
binary with the current or previous Pg releases. However, with the new
cache replacement system being used in 7.5devel, the situation *may* be
different (wonder if anyone has tried this out yet?).


Quite honestly, I suspect we may be wasting our time hacking the
Postgres buffer replacement algorithm at all. There are a bunch of
reasons why the PG shared buffer arena should never be more than a
small fraction of physical RAM, and under those conditions the cache
replacement algorithm that will matter is the kernel's, not ours.

I stand ready to be proven wrong, of course ...


Let's see,

I'm not actually claiming you're wrong. But it seems that the new ARC
code together with the background writer is at least as good as the OS
buffer cache. Looking at these tests:

http://developer.postgresql.org/~wieck/PGvsOSbuffers/

I see a 9.8% and 18.9% improvement on the 90th percentile of transaction
response time comparing 1000 to 50000 shared buffers. And a 17.8% and
21.8% improvement comparing 10000 to 50000 shared buffers. The old
school "sweet spot" of shared_buffers is the loser, interesting, eh?

I guess that the higher buffer hit rate pays off in this particular test
scenario, which does not look at average response times or overall
throughput but aims to satisfy 90% of all requests within 5 seconds.
Note that the server is in all 6 test runs slightly overloaded as it
cannot meet this requirement ever. However, the total number of
processed transactions is highest for 50000 buffers, but only marginal.
Jan

--
#============== =============== =============== =============== ===========#
# It's easier to get forgiveness for being wrong than for being right. #
# Let's break this rule - forgive me. #
#============== =============== =============== ====== Ja******@Yahoo. com #
---------------------------(end of broadcast)---------------------------
TIP 7: don't forget to increase your free space map settings

Nov 22 '05 #26

This thread has been closed and replies have been disabled. Please start a new discussion.

Similar topics

0
1441
by: Mike | last post by:
Right now I run mysql and apache together on a dual p3 1.3ghz box. I will be moving mysql to a second box, eather an identical dual p3 box or spending a little more and going for a single Xeon 3Ghz (these are the only two options I have). I'm thinking of hanging the db box behind the webserver using a gigabit crossover. Since I mostly read cached data, I'm leaning towards the dual CPU box so that when I have a long running query thats...
5
2995
by: John Dalberg | last post by:
I am planning to build a server to be used as a SQL Server and web server. Right now I can only use a single box for both. I have read some threads were dual processors are having problems with some parallel queries and the suggestions of having sql server use a single CPU. My budget is limited so I am debating whether to get 2.6G dual xeon 533FSB or dual P4 800FSB (DRR@ ram) or stick with a speedy single cpu. If I get a dual cpu...
0
1246
by: Rob R. Ainscough | last post by:
I have two computers running the exact same application against the exact same database (in this case a local MS Access database). One PC is a dual Xeon 3.06Ghz 1MB cache with 2GB of memory and 10,000 rpm SATA drives (two). The other PC is a laptop (Sony) with a Pentium M 755 (2Ghz, 2MB L2 cache), 1GB ram and 100GB HD. I was expecting the Xeon desktop PC to clearly out perform the Sony Laptop,
15
1758
by: alex4groups | last post by:
Hi, I've been creating a db application using MS Access and MSDE. Only two of us are using the application, and the server and the app both run great on my laptop (1.6 GHz Pentium M, 2GB RAM, W2KPro). Only problem is when I take my laptop home, my coworker loses access to the server. We recently purchased a dedicated server to run the db on at the office. It's a 2.8 GHz Dual Xeon, 2GB RAM, running XPPro. We also bought SQL Server,...
1
1562
by: Rob | last post by:
We are an ASP and are converting our application from VB to VB.NET. Our web farm is a mix of older dual processor 1.2GHz servers and newer dual processor 3.0GHz Xeon servers. When we originally got the new 3.0GHz boxes our VB code thrived on them, dramatically outperforming our 1.2GHz boxes at every load level. Now with the .NET code it appears that under light to moderate load, our 1.2GHz servers are out performing our 3.0GHz boxes. ...
0
1254
by: Goldrake | last post by:
I really hope that somebody can help me to solve a problem.... I have an asp.net application that call word to make an automation for generate a document (inserting various table and file in the document). I tested the application on a desktop pc (P4 2.8Ghz, 512MB) with Win2k3Srv installed and all run without problem. The same application running on a Xeon P4 HT Dual Processor with 2GB Ram + Win2000Srv, is tremendously slower. It...
1
1552
by: Rocael Hernandez | last post by:
Hello all, I was wondering what's best for PG, since we have to decide what will be the new server for our DB, that will serve one or more websites. Our actual configuration is a dual xeon 2.8ghz with 4Gb ram + scsi disks, and works fine, though some intensive insert/update processes has taken it to 100% cpu use.
2
1991
by: gilad.kapel | last post by:
Hi I have a system composed of sevral DLLs all round up into one WebService. I'm working with VS2005 Framework 2.0 under WinXP. The system is at the end of its development stage and was both checked on a WinXP & Win2003 32bit systems on the same computer (Standard P4 - 3GHz with 1Mb of ram)
12
8808
by: harry | last post by:
Just wondering, if one has Dual or Quad core CPU and one is running multiple different programs, or multiple copies of the same program, does the operating system (XP or 2003) run each individual program on seperate cores? or does one need to do something when starting the programs on the command line or through code to force them to run on seperate cores? Thanks harry
0
11272
Oralloy
by: Oralloy | last post by:
Hello folks, I am unable to find appropriate documentation on the type promotion of bit-fields when using the generalised comparison operator "<=>". The problem is that using the GNU compilers, it seems that the internal comparison operator "<=>" tries to promote arguments from unsigned to signed. This is as boiled down as I can make it. Here is my compilation command: g++-12 -std=c++20 -Wnarrowing bit_field.cpp Here is the code in...
0
10863
jinu1996
by: jinu1996 | last post by:
In today's digital age, having a compelling online presence is paramount for businesses aiming to thrive in a competitive landscape. At the heart of this digital strategy lies an intricately woven tapestry of website design and digital marketing. It's not merely about having a website; it's about crafting an immersive digital experience that captivates audiences and drives business growth. The Art of Business Website Design Your website is...
1
10971
by: Hystou | last post by:
Overview: Windows 11 and 10 have less user interface control over operating system update behaviour than previous versions of Windows. In Windows 11 and 10, there is no way to turn off the Windows Update option using the Control Panel or Settings app; it automatically checks for updates and installs any it finds, whether you like it or not. For most users, this new feature is actually very convenient. If you want to control the update process,...
0
9666
agi2029
by: agi2029 | last post by:
Let's talk about the concept of autonomous AI software engineers and no-code agents. These AIs are designed to manage the entire lifecycle of a software development project—planning, coding, testing, and deployment—without human intervention. Imagine an AI that can take a project description, break it down, write the code, debug it, and then launch it, all on its own.... Now, this would greatly impact the work of software developers. The idea...
1
8039
isladogs
by: isladogs | last post by:
The next Access Europe User Group meeting will be on Wednesday 1 May 2024 starting at 18:00 UK time (6PM UTC+1) and finishing by 19:30 (7.30PM). In this session, we are pleased to welcome a new presenter, Adolph Dupré who will be discussing some powerful techniques for using class modules. He will explain when you may want to use classes instead of User Defined Types (UDT). For example, to manage the data in unbound forms. Adolph will...
0
7201
by: conductexam | last post by:
I have .net C# application in which I am extracting data from word file and save it in database particularly. To store word all data as it is I am converting the whole word file firstly in HTML and then checking html paragraph one by one. At the time of converting from word file to html my equations which are in the word document file was convert into image. Globals.ThisAddIn.Application.ActiveDocument.Select();...
0
5887
by: TSSRALBI | last post by:
Hello I'm a network technician in training and I need your help. I am currently learning how to create and manage the different types of VPNs and I have a question about LAN-to-LAN VPNs. The last exercise I practiced was to create a LAN-to-LAN VPN between two Pfsense firewalls, by using IPSEC protocols. I succeeded, with both firewalls in the same network. But I'm wondering if it's possible to do the same thing, with 2 Pfsense firewalls...
0
6081
by: adsilva | last post by:
A Windows Forms form does not have the event Unload, like VB6. What one acts like?
3
3317
bsmnconsultancy
by: bsmnconsultancy | last post by:
In today's digital era, a well-designed website is crucial for businesses looking to succeed. Whether you're a small business owner or a large corporation in Toronto, having a strong online presence can significantly impact your brand's success. BSMN Consultancy, a leader in Website Development in Toronto offers valuable insights into creating effective websites that not only look great but also perform exceptionally well. In this comprehensive...

By using Bytes.com and it's services, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

To disable or enable advertisements and analytics tracking please visit the manage ads & tracking page.