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PHP5 and MySQL

P: n/a
Looking at the list of changes made in PHP5 one of them is

"Removed the bundled MySQL client library"

Does anyone know exactly what this means? I assume we will still be able to
code for MySQL as we do now?

Thanks

Hamilton
Jul 16 '05 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
Yes, but you need to specify the client library at compilation using
--with-mysql=/usr/local (that's the default path I think)

Spidah wrote:
Looking at the list of changes made in PHP5 one of them is

"Removed the bundled MySQL client library"

Does anyone know exactly what this means? I assume we will still be able to
code for MySQL as we do now?

Thanks

Hamilton


Jul 16 '05 #2

P: n/a
On Thu, 31 Jul 2003 10:07:59 +1200, "Spidah" <no****@eggstra.co.nz>
wrote:
Looking at the list of changes made in PHP5 one of them is

"Removed the bundled MySQL client library"
Previously PHP came with the client portions of MySQL included in the
distribution. This is no longer the case (apparently because of
licensing issues).
Does anyone know exactly what this means? I assume we will still be able to
code for MySQL as we do now?


Yes.

Just because a MySQL client isn't included, this does not mean that
MySQL support has been dropped - not at all, the MySQL PHP extension
is there as before, and an improved version based on MySQL 4.1 is in
development (the mysqli extension).

All it means is you have to have an existing MySQL client installed
(if your MySQL database is on the same machine then you've already got
it, if not then it's no great hardship to install it), and you specify
--with-mysql when compiling PHP, or possibly pass it the path to the
client libraries if it's in a non-standard location.

The situation in the Windows precompiled .zip version for PHP5beta1
appears confused at the moment, as they've included the MySQL client
libraries, but not included the MySQL PHP extension. I can't see any
reason why this can't be worked out before PHP5 comes out of beta.

Looking in the latest php5 .zip package from snaps.php.net, that does
now appear to include the php_mysql.dll PHP extension. (And also,
still, the MySQL client library).

[ What's the betting that this'll be the new FAQ to replace
register_globals ;-p ]

--
Andy Hassall (an**@andyh.co.uk) icq(5747695) (http://www.andyh.co.uk)
Space: disk usage analysis tool (http://www.andyhsoftware.co.uk/space)
Jul 16 '05 #3

P: n/a
Thanks to both respondents for the clarification.

Sounds like the new regime will be much as I thought.

Of course, I can't actually see how licensing issues would be behind the
change when both PHP & MySQL(most versions) are both open source and
provided free of charge. Presumably the dll included in the latest builds of
PHP5 is to ensure support for at least the free versions of MySQL is
continued as before.

Hamilton

http://www.laughland.biz
"the web site for web sites"

"Andy Hassall" <an**@andyh.co.uk> wrote in message
news:pj********************************@4ax.com...
On Thu, 31 Jul 2003 10:07:59 +1200, "Spidah" <no****@eggstra.co.nz>
wrote:
Looking at the list of changes made in PHP5 one of them is

"Removed the bundled MySQL client library"


Previously PHP came with the client portions of MySQL included in the
distribution. This is no longer the case (apparently because of
licensing issues).
Does anyone know exactly what this means? I assume we will still be able tocode for MySQL as we do now?


Yes.

Just because a MySQL client isn't included, this does not mean that
MySQL support has been dropped - not at all, the MySQL PHP extension
is there as before, and an improved version based on MySQL 4.1 is in
development (the mysqli extension).

All it means is you have to have an existing MySQL client installed
(if your MySQL database is on the same machine then you've already got
it, if not then it's no great hardship to install it), and you specify
--with-mysql when compiling PHP, or possibly pass it the path to the
client libraries if it's in a non-standard location.

The situation in the Windows precompiled .zip version for PHP5beta1
appears confused at the moment, as they've included the MySQL client
libraries, but not included the MySQL PHP extension. I can't see any
reason why this can't be worked out before PHP5 comes out of beta.

Looking in the latest php5 .zip package from snaps.php.net, that does
now appear to include the php_mysql.dll PHP extension. (And also,
still, the MySQL client library).

[ What's the betting that this'll be the new FAQ to replace
register_globals ;-p ]

--
Andy Hassall (an**@andyh.co.uk) icq(5747695) (http://www.andyh.co.uk)
Space: disk usage analysis tool (http://www.andyhsoftware.co.uk/space)

Jul 16 '05 #4

P: n/a
> Of course, I can't actually see how licensing issues would be behind the
change when both PHP & MySQL(most versions) are both open source and
provided free of charge. Presumably the dll included in the latest builds of PHP5 is to ensure support for at least the free versions of MySQL is
continued as before.


Reminiscient of George Orwell's Animal Farm, some licenses are more "free"
than others. MySQL ships with a GPL license, which does not play nicely
with PHP's BSD-style license. (GPL would seem to imply that the simple act
of linking PHP to the MySQL client libraries would make PHP a derivative
work of MySQL... ya, okay.)

Not all open-source projects are created equal. :-)

For more information on the MySQL / PHP debundling and license issues, have
a look at http://www.phparch.com/mysql/

HTH.
Pete.

--
Peter James
pe***@phparch.com

php|architect
The Magazine for PHP Professionals
http://www.phparch.com
Jul 16 '05 #5

P: n/a
Exactly what does this mean for PHP scripters?

If I write a PHP script that uses MySQL as its database engine is my script
considered a derivative work of MySQL (meaning I need a commercial MySQL
licence if I want to sell the script)?

Regards
Hamilton
"Peter James" <pe***@shaman.ca> wrote in message
news:vi************@corp.supernews.com...
Of course, I can't actually see how licensing issues would be behind the
change when both PHP & MySQL(most versions) are both open source and
provided free of charge. Presumably the dll included in the latest
builds of
PHP5 is to ensure support for at least the free versions of MySQL is
continued as before.
Reminiscient of George Orwell's Animal Farm, some licenses are more "free"
than others. MySQL ships with a GPL license, which does not play nicely
with PHP's BSD-style license. (GPL would seem to imply that the simple

act of linking PHP to the MySQL client libraries would make PHP a derivative
work of MySQL... ya, okay.)

Not all open-source projects are created equal. :-)

For more information on the MySQL / PHP debundling and license issues, have a look at http://www.phparch.com/mysql/

HTH.
Pete.

--
Peter James
pe***@phparch.com

php|architect
The Magazine for PHP Professionals
http://www.phparch.com

Jul 16 '05 #6

P: n/a
I think no.
Check out: http://www.nusphere.com/products/lib...401openmag.pdf
(a lawyer's view on these matters)

That being said, the Mysql license page contains some fuzzy-looking
language to the effect that if your application can only use MySQL you
may have to pay a license fee, but not if your application could
(theoretically) use a different DB package. Sort of funny.

Using PEAR DB, and staying away from MySQL-specific syntax should
alleviate that concern, anyway.

Best, Mattias

Spidah wrote:
Exactly what does this mean for PHP scripters?

If I write a PHP script that uses MySQL as its database engine is my script
considered a derivative work of MySQL (meaning I need a commercial MySQL
licence if I want to sell the script)?

Regards
Hamilton
"Peter James" <pe***@shaman.ca> wrote in message
news:vi************@corp.supernews.com...
Of course, I can't actually see how licensing issues would be behind the
change when both PHP & MySQL(most versions) are both open source and
provided free of charge. Presumably the dll included in the latest


builds
of
PHP5 is to ensure support for at least the free versions of MySQL is
continued as before.


Reminiscient of George Orwell's Animal Farm, some licenses are more "free"
than others. MySQL ships with a GPL license, which does not play nicely
with PHP's BSD-style license. (GPL would seem to imply that the simple


act
of linking PHP to the MySQL client libraries would make PHP a derivative
work of MySQL... ya, okay.)

Not all open-source projects are created equal. :-)

For more information on the MySQL / PHP debundling and license issues,


have
a look at http://www.phparch.com/mysql/

HTH.
Pete.

--
Peter James
pe***@phparch.com

php|architect
The Magazine for PHP Professionals
http://www.phparch.com



Jul 16 '05 #7

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