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Documenting PHP extensions.

P: n/a
Hi,

I've been developing a PHP extension and used ext_skel to generate the
stubs for each function that I coded.

At the begin of a function there is some meta information about the
arguments and the return value.

I would like to use that meta information to generate a document about
the extension, in order to describe it to the users. Is there any tool
out there able to help my in this task?

Best regards,
Gama Franco

Jul 17 '05 #1
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On Sun, 06 Jun 2004 02:02:03 +0100, Gama Franco <ga*********@clix.pt> wrote:
Hi,

I've been developing a PHP extension and used ext_skel to generate the
stubs for each function that I coded.

At the begin of a function there is some meta information about the
arguments and the return value.

I would like to use that meta information to generate a document about
the extension, in order to describe it to the users. Is there any tool
out there able to help my in this task?

Best regards,
Gama Franco

doxygen (http://www.doxygen.org)

<---snip from site--->
Introduction

Doxygen is a documentation system for C++, C, Java, Objective-C, IDL (Corba and Microsoft flavors)
and to some extent PHP, C# and D.

It can help you in three ways:
It can generate an on-line documentation browser (in HTML) and/or an off-line reference manual (in )
from a set of documented source files. There is also support for generating output in RTF (MS-Word),
PostScript, hyperlinked PDF, compressed HTML, and Unix man pages. The documentation is extracted
directly from the sources, which makes it much easier to keep the documentation consistent with the
source code.
You can configure doxygen to extract the code structure from undocumented source files. This is very
useful to quickly find your way in large source distributions. You can also visualize the relations
between the various elements by means of include dependency graphs, inheritance diagrams, and
collaboration diagrams, which are all generated automatically.
You can even `abuse' doxygen for creating normal documentation (as I did for this manual).

Doxygen is developed under Linux, but is set-up to be highly portable. As a result, it runs on most
other Unix flavors as well. Furthermore, executables for Windows 9x/NT and Mac OS X are available.

Jul 17 '05 #2

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