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PHP versus Mason

P: n/a
I am currently evaluating what language I should use to create a web
interface to some of our databases. I am purely in the fact finding
stage at this point, having no website nor database set up yet. This
is sort of a new area for me, so I am looking for some advice.

Part of our organization has Cold Fusion running on its web server.
It would really be no problem for me to build an application there for
some of the "public" verisions of the data. However, much of the data
is very restricted, and will have to to reside on a Linux server that
only myself and only a few other people have access to. That is a
fairly bare bones system, and we will not be able to spring a couple
of grand to have Cold Fusion running there. I am not overly
disappointed, as I am a little wary of proprietary languages anyway.

That leaves me to find a good, cheap, way to do things. Most likely
the database will be set up with postgresql. I was initially leaning
toward PHP as the language for the web application. We have Apache
web server running on Linux with PHP included. However, I found out
that our IT folks have actually disabled PHP and want me to use
something called Mason.

Questions that come to mind are:
1) Why disable PHP? I should be asking the admins this, but I would
like to at least understand the issues before I talk to them. We are
ultra paranoid about IT security here. Is there something about PHP
that makes them nervous? Is Mason better?
2) Do a lot of people actually use Mason? Are there any strengths or
weaknesses versus PHP?
3) Any thoughts on Cold Fusion here? Since we already have it, should
I try to make the most of it?
Jul 17 '05 #1
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P: n/a
Have you take a look at Ruby? ( http://www.ruby-lang.org )
Jul 17 '05 #2

P: n/a

"Preslopsky" <pr********@frb.gov> wrote in message
news:3f**************************@posting.google.c om...
I am currently evaluating what language I should use to create a web
interface to some of our databases. I am purely in the fact finding
stage at this point, having no website nor database set up yet. This
is sort of a new area for me, so I am looking for some advice.

Part of our organization has Cold Fusion running on its web server.
It would really be no problem for me to build an application there for
some of the "public" verisions of the data. However, much of the data
is very restricted, and will have to to reside on a Linux server that
only myself and only a few other people have access to. That is a
fairly bare bones system, and we will not be able to spring a couple
of grand to have Cold Fusion running there. I am not overly
disappointed, as I am a little wary of proprietary languages anyway.

That leaves me to find a good, cheap, way to do things. Most likely
the database will be set up with postgresql. I was initially leaning
toward PHP as the language for the web application. We have Apache
web server running on Linux with PHP included. However, I found out
that our IT folks have actually disabled PHP and want me to use
something called Mason.

Questions that come to mind are:
1) Why disable PHP?
Probably because they do not know what it is. If they had any knowledge of
it they would not be afraid. They have probably read somewhere that "PHP is
full of bugs and is insecure" but that information is wildly out of date and
innaccurate.
I should be asking the admins this, but I would
like to at least understand the issues before I talk to them. We are
ultra paranoid about IT security here. Is there something about PHP
that makes them nervous?
PHP is no more insecure than any other language - it just depends on the
skill of the programmer. It is possible for a bad programmer to screw up in
any language you care to mention. There are numerous resources on the web
which highlight the areas you should look out for, therefore writing a
secure application should not be a problem.
Is Mason better?
MASON is based on PERL which is a general-purpose scripting language which
had web capabilities bolted on afterwards. On the other hand PHP was
specifically designed for the web. You can write PHP code to achieve things
more quickly than you can write Perl code. Check out the various articles on
the subject from the links at
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&l...RL&btnG=Search
2) Do a lot of people actually use Mason? Are there any strengths or
weaknesses versus PHP?
Details on MASON can be found at http://www.masonhq.com/.
3) Any thoughts on Cold Fusion here? Since we already have it, should
I try to make the most of it?


If you already have knowledge of Coldfusion then why not? But if it is going
to cost a couple of grand then that could be a sticking point, especially
when you consider that PHP is free.

Just my two pence worth.

--
Tony Marston

http://www.tonymarston.net

Jul 17 '05 #3

P: n/a
"Tony Marston" <to**@NOSPAM.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
news:c9*******************@news.demon.co.uk...

"Preslopsky" <pr********@frb.gov> wrote in message
news:3f**************************@posting.google.c om...

<long snip>
2) Do a lot of people actually use Mason? Are there any strengths or
weaknesses versus PHP?


Details on MASON can be found at http://www.masonhq.com/.


I agree with Tony and add, in response to the above question, that in 25
years as a software developer, this thread is the first time I have ever
heard of a language called Mason or MASON. Maybe I should get out more
<grin>, but it certainly is not a well-known or widely used language in my
experience.

Just my $0.02
Cheers,
Doug

--
Remove the blots from my address to reply
Jul 17 '05 #4

P: n/a
On 2004-05-28, Ruby Tuesdays <No**********************@yahoo.com> wrote:
Have you take a look at Ruby? ( http://www.ruby-lang.org )


As far as web development is concerned Ruby is still lacking some grounds
compared to e.g. PHP. No need to flame me now, I know of CGIKIT and the like.

;-)

Bye,
phil
--
Please send replys (not followups) to the address set in Reply-To.
Philipp Kern - PK2186-RIPE - http://www.philkern.de
Jul 17 '05 #5

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