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Is it useful to remove comments & spaces from source code?

P: n/a
will performance increae if I removed comments & space from source
code using php -w ...?

given that i don't need to modify the source code, & don't use any
cache?

Jan 30 '07 #1
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P: n/a
howa wrote:
will performance increae if I removed comments & space from source
code using php -w ...?

given that i don't need to modify the source code, & don't use any
cache?
Hi

php -w will return the stripped sourcecode (whitespace and comment).
It will not run the script.

If you reduce your filesize by removing comments, you will get:
1) a slightly faster execution (don't expect too much).
2) A headache if you want to modify the code and the usefull comments are
stripped out.

My advise: Don't do it.

If your application is slow, find out why. I am quite sure it is NOT the
commentlines that makes the application slow.

Just do some simple profiling, using microtime() to store the time for each
thing that happens in your script.
In my experience, 9 out of 10 times the reason for slow webapps is a poorly
designed database, or poorly designed query logic.
for example: running 40 seperate queries to build 1 page.

Regards,
Erwin Moller
Jan 30 '07 #2

P: n/a
we will keep an original codes in the SVN,...

the main point is: around 20-30% of file size are from comments &
white space, we think that when each time include_once is called,
dummy information need to be read by PHP interpreter, seems waste of
cpu time...
My advise: Don't do it.

If your application is slow, find out why. I am quite sure it is NOT the
commentlines that makes the application slow.

Just do some simple profiling, using microtime() to store the time for each
thing that happens in your script.
In my experience, 9 out of 10 times the reason for slow webapps is a poorly
designed database, or poorly designed query logic.
for example: running 40 seperate queries to build 1 page.

Regards,
Erwin Moller

Jan 30 '07 #3

P: n/a
howa wrote:
we will keep an original codes in the SVN,...

the main point is: around 20-30% of file size are from comments &
white space, we think that when each time include_once is called,
dummy information need to be read by PHP interpreter, seems waste of
cpu time...
Well, simply benchmark the execution time with and without comments.

But I don't think you will see a large increase in performance.
The IO needed to read a few K comments will not be impressive...

Remember that every modern OS caches files on disk in memory, even reducing
that overhead..

If your app is slow, find out why first, or you'll be wasting your time
shooting in the dark.

Regards,
Erwin Moller
>

>My advise: Don't do it.

If your application is slow, find out why. I am quite sure it is NOT the
commentlines that makes the application slow.

Just do some simple profiling, using microtime() to store the time for
each thing that happens in your script.
In my experience, 9 out of 10 times the reason for slow webapps is a
poorly designed database, or poorly designed query logic.
for example: running 40 seperate queries to build 1 page.

Regards,
Erwin Moller
Jan 30 '07 #4

P: n/a

"howa" <ho******@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11*********************@m58g2000cwm.googlegro ups.com...
we will keep an original codes in the SVN,...

the main point is: around 20-30% of file size are from comments &
white space, we think that when each time include_once is called,
dummy information need to be read by PHP interpreter, seems waste of
cpu time...

CPU time is cheap. Developer time is expensive. Work it out.
Jan 30 '07 #5

P: n/a
..oO(howa)
>the main point is: around 20-30% of file size are from comments &
white space, we think that when each time include_once is called,
dummy information need to be read by PHP interpreter, seems waste of
cpu time...
The real bottlenecks are somewhere else. The xdebug extension contains a
profiler, which can show you where you're really wasting CPU time. It's
in your code, not the comments.

Micha
Jan 30 '07 #6

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