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Recommand Best inventory software

P: n/a
Friends.

I need a inventory software in php for my friend's general merchant
shop.
please recommand which one is best.
In sourceforde and freshmeat, i find a lot.
but, unable to try many.

so, recommand me which one is better, error free.

Thanks.
T.Shrinivasan.

Jun 10 '06 #1
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P: n/a
shrini wrote:
Friends.

I need a inventory software in php for my friend's general merchant
shop.
please recommand which one is best.
In sourceforde and freshmeat, i find a lot.
but, unable to try many.

so, recommand me which one is better, error free.

Thanks.
T.Shrinivasan.


That's like asking "My friend needs a new car. Please recommend which one is
the best". It's impossible to give a recommendation for an existing one without
knowing a lot of details about your friend's specific needs. There are just too
many variables which would affect an inventory system design.

Of course, the "best one" is one specifically written to meet your friend's needs.

--
==================
Remove the "x" from my email address
Jerry Stuckle
JDS Computer Training Corp.
js*******@attglobal.net
==================
Jun 12 '06 #2

P: n/a
Following on from Jerry Stuckle's message. . .
Of course, the "best one" is one specifically written to meet your friend's needs.

Umm. Not necessarily.

Perhaps the "best one" is a 'sort of does the job' which opens some eyes
to what is possible, what matters and what doesn't seem to work. /Then/
(See Fred Brooks' "Mythical man month") use that as a jumping-off point.
The *last thing* required is the OP trying to hack an inventory system.
"I haven't a clue but I'm willing to try" Don't give up the day job OP.
--
PETER FOX Not the same since the cardboard box company folded
pe******@eminent.demon.co.uk.not.this.bit.no.html
2 Tees Close, Witham, Essex.
Gravity beer in Essex <http://www.eminent.demon.co.uk>
Jun 12 '06 #3

P: n/a
Peter Fox wrote:
Following on from Jerry Stuckle's message. . .
Of course, the "best one" is one specifically written to meet your
friend's needs.
Umm. Not necessarily.


Oh, definitely. A custom program is *always* the "best" - because it can fit
the customer's needs *exactly* without any excess baggage. But it may not
always be the most *practical*.
Perhaps the "best one" is a 'sort of does the job' which opens some eyes
to what is possible, what matters and what doesn't seem to work. /Then/
(See Fred Brooks' "Mythical man month") use that as a jumping-off point.

That's one way of doing it. You won't generally get the "best" answer - but you
can often get "good enough" without too much effort.

The *last thing* required is the OP trying to hack an inventory system.
"I haven't a clue but I'm willing to try" Don't give up the day job OP.

--
==================
Remove the "x" from my email address
Jerry Stuckle
JDS Computer Training Corp.
js*******@attglobal.net
==================
Jun 13 '06 #4

P: n/a

Friends.

Last week only I bought a computer for my friends general merchant
shop.
He is running the shop for last 10 years.
Now he is learning computer.
I put suse 10 on that box.

Even though the Inventory software specially mede for him only the best
one,
If there is anything existing, I can show him thet how to make the use
of computer.
He now uses a lot of notebooks to maintain the inventory, customer
details, bills etc.

So, if i got any existing one, i can easily tailor it for his specific
needs.

Thanks.
T.Shrinivasan.

Jun 13 '06 #5

P: n/a
Following on from Jerry Stuckle's message. . .
Peter Fox wrote:
Following on from Jerry Stuckle's message. . .
Of course, the "best one" is one specifically written to meet your
friend's needs.

Umm. Not necessarily.


Oh, definitely. A custom program is *always* the "best" - because it can fit
the customer's needs *exactly* without any excess baggage. But it may not
always be the most *practical*.

So it's late. It's full of bugs. It's not documented and supported on
a poke 'n hope basis. The user's needs were neither understood nor
articulated by the user and only 'sort-of' implemented by the
programmer. Is that what you mean by "best"?
--
PETER FOX Not the same since the submarine business went under
pe******@eminent.demon.co.uk.not.this.bit.no.html
2 Tees Close, Witham, Essex.
Gravity beer in Essex <http://www.eminent.demon.co.uk>
Jun 13 '06 #6

P: n/a
In article <oi**************@eminent.demon.co.uk>,
pe******@eminent.demon.co.uk.not.this.bit.no.html says...
So it's late. It's full of bugs. It's not documented and supported on
a poke 'n hope basis. The user's needs were neither understood nor
articulated by the user and only 'sort-of' implemented by the
programmer. Is that what you mean by "best"?


HA !

I recognise that program !!!

tony
Jun 13 '06 #7

P: n/a
Peter Fox wrote:
Following on from Jerry Stuckle's message. . .
Peter Fox wrote:
Following on from Jerry Stuckle's message. . .

Of course, the "best one" is one specifically written to meet your
friend's needs.

Umm. Not necessarily.


Oh, definitely. A custom program is *always* the "best" - because it
can fit
the customer's needs *exactly* without any excess baggage. But it may
not
always be the most *practical*.

So it's late. It's full of bugs. It's not documented and supported on
a poke 'n hope basis. The user's needs were neither understood nor
articulated by the user and only 'sort-of' implemented by the
programmer. Is that what you mean by "best"?


Not if it's planned well. It's on time, has few bugs and is documented. It's
called Project Management.

Over the years I've done dozens of such projects - ranging from one person to
teams of 20 or more programmers. Done right it's a success. But if it's not
managed properly, you will get the results you describe.

As I said - it's the *best* because it meets the customer's exact needs. But it
may not be the *most practical*. Spending $20K to $100K for an application when
there is a $200 commercial package on the market which fits the customer's needs
(and maybe has some bloat) is probably more practical.

But as a consultant, before I recommend something to a customer (whether
pre-packaged or custom), I first have to understand the customer's needs and how
he wants to use the software. Only then can I recommend the *most practical*
solution.

In this case it's for a machine shop. Well, that's a lot different need than
for a small retail clothing store. But it's still not enough info to recommend
the *most practical* solution to the problem.

--
==================
Remove the "x" from my email address
Jerry Stuckle
JDS Computer Training Corp.
js*******@attglobal.net
==================
Jun 13 '06 #8

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