473,388 Members | 1,010 Online
Bytes | Software Development & Data Engineering Community
Post Job

Home Posts Topics Members FAQ

Join Bytes to post your question to a community of 473,388 software developers and data experts.

PHP and Access databases

Jo
Hello

I am a web designer who is slowly trying to learn more about web
development. I have a client who would like to drive their website
using a database so I am now in the perfect situation to move my
skills forward.

I know a little about databases or the scripting languages that
connect them to web pages (is that the right terminology?!) but I am
determined to improve my skills in this area.

However, I have a few constraints:

The little that I know about databases is centered around Access so I
would prefer to use that if I can. I have played with MySQL but seeing
as I am a novice, I find it a little tricky to work with.

Also, all my clients use unix servers so, after a little research, I
have come to the conclusion that PHP is my only option - is this the
correct assumption?

So, my main question is: can I use Access and PHP together? And, if
I can, could anyone recommend a good tutorial/book I can follow to get
me started?

Thanks in advance for any help you can give me.

Jo
Jul 16 '05 #1
10 20008
Hi,

Jo wrote:
So, my main question is: can I use Access and PHP together? And, if
I can, could anyone recommend a good tutorial/book I can follow to get
me started?


I've never used the two together, but it shouldn't be a problem using
ODBC. Windows PHP claims to have ODBC built in so it should be easy
enough - the functions are documented on
http://uk.php.net/odbc . I'm not aware of any tutorials about this but
a quick google reveals that a fair number of people have tried this combo.

Luke

Jul 16 '05 #2
Jo wrote:
Hello

I am a web designer who is slowly trying to learn more about web
development. I have a client who would like to drive their website
using a database so I am now in the perfect situation to move my
skills forward.

I know a little about databases or the scripting languages that
connect them to web pages (is that the right terminology?!) but I am
determined to improve my skills in this area.

However, I have a few constraints:

The little that I know about databases is centered around Access so I
would prefer to use that if I can. I have played with MySQL but seeing
as I am a novice, I find it a little tricky to work with.

Also, all my clients use unix servers so, after a little research, I
have come to the conclusion that PHP is my only option - is this the
correct assumption?

So, my main question is: can I use Access and PHP together? And, if
I can, could anyone recommend a good tutorial/book I can follow to get
me started?

Thanks in advance for any help you can give me.

Jo


Having used access a long time back, I know for sure that you can read the
SQL queries perfectly.
Knowing this I surely recommend you look into PHP and MySQL as database.
It's not as difficult at you might think, just take you words out of your
head, contruct them logical and then write your SQL statements.

/Andreas

--
Registeret Linux user #292411
Jul 16 '05 #3
> The little that I know about databases is centered around Access so I
would prefer to use that if I can. I have played with MySQL but seeing
as I am a novice, I find it a little tricky to work with.
There are a few decent front ends, I would reccomend you look into these in
the long-run it'll be more beneficial. Access is crap :)
Also, all my clients use unix servers so, after a little research, I
have come to the conclusion that PHP is my only option - is this the
correct assumption?
No yuhave others but PHP is the better out of them neway... I have used
Could Fusion, ASP etc but always go back/convert ppl to PHP!
So, my main question is: can I use Access and PHP together? And, if
I can, could anyone recommend a good tutorial/book I can follow to get
me started?


However if you are constrained to Access PHP will work with it thru ODBC as
somone has suggested... I have done this but the webservers was on a windows
machine running Apache/PHP and just set up system DSN to the access DB...
watch oput for it locking itself tho! - yet another reason to push yourself
to either MySQL or postgres (this should have a few GUI's too).

For mysql gui's http://www.mysql.com/downloads/index.html look under
Graphical clients and also:

MySQL Front was good

http://mysqlfront.venturemedia.de/in...a6a4fbf290d6b6

And also there is a few web-based interfaces sush as phpMyAdmin which I
reccomend too.
Jul 16 '05 #4
Message-ID: <14*************************@posting.google.com> from Jo
contained the following:
The little that I know about databases is centered around Access so I
would prefer to use that if I can. I have played with MySQL but seeing
as I am a novice, I find it a little tricky to work with.


Most of Access is front end and reporting. Since you will probably be
creating that yourself on the page then you are left with the basic RDBMS.
You need to learn some SQL for queries but once you have and once you have
one programmed you can often use the same query in many different ways.

I have found some aspects of MySql to be much easier than using Access to
be honest. And it is much more satisfying.

How complex is your database?

--
Geoff Berrow
It's only Usenet, no one dies.
My opinions, not the committee's, mine.
Simple RFDs http://www.ckdog.co.uk/rfdmaker/
Jul 16 '05 #5
Jo wrote:
Hello

I am a web designer who is slowly trying to learn more about web
development. I have a client who would like to drive their website
using a database so I am now in the perfect situation to move my
skills forward.

I know a little about databases or the scripting languages that
connect them to web pages (is that the right terminology?!) but I am
determined to improve my skills in this area.

However, I have a few constraints:

The little that I know about databases is centered around Access so I
would prefer to use that if I can. I have played with MySQL but seeing
as I am a novice, I find it a little tricky to work with.
If you played with Access, I suppose you at least know some bits of SQL.
If not, nothing prevent you from looking at the SQL code outputed py the
QBE. Even if it may have some pitfalls, SQL is quite straightforward for
usual requests.

MySQL is pretty simple to use, is a real database server, and is quite
fast for read access (no pun). No mystery why it's the de facto standard
for web development.

Also, all my clients use unix servers so, after a little research, I
have come to the conclusion that PHP is my only option - is this the
correct assumption?
No, you may use Java, Python, Perl etc... And probably even ASP (yuck),
but in your case, PHP is probably (with a very high probability) the
best choice.

BTW, if your clients use unix servers, definitively forget about Access,
<troll>and step into the real OS world</troll>.

Seriously, why would you get stuck with a stupid proprietary
non-standard indexed-file-based so called DBMS, when you can get a good
fast standard SQL server ?-)

So, my main question is: can I use Access and PHP together?


I guess you could, but why would you ? I strongly advise you not to do
this. Take some time to install and learn MySQL, and go for it.

There are PHP/Apache/MySQL packages that are easy to install, like
EasyPhp (someone else might tell you more about this...).

Bruno

Jul 16 '05 #6
jo*********@btinternet.com idiotically stated:
Hello

I am a web designer who is slowly trying to learn more about web
development. I have a client who would like to drive their website
using a database so I am now in the perfect situation to move my
skills forward.


goto www.devshed.com and read their php/mysql tutorials. they basically
walk you through setting up, designing, maintaining, and using a php-mysql
driven dynamic website. you can then really design any kind of setup you
want - account managers, content managers, blogging tools, really anything
your heart desires.

--
brian ... brian@cc
Jul 16 '05 #7
> The little that I know about databases is centered around Access so I
would prefer to use that if I can. I have played with MySQL but seeing
as I am a novice, I find it a little tricky to work with.
From PHP mySQL is about the easiest you can get. Support is built in so
connecting and executing the queries is very easy. Its been years since I
used Access and can't even remember how it's queried, but SQL syntax is
really very simple, and reading the documentation for PHP and mySQL will
give you a great insight into using it. The PHP documentation will give you
the commands you need to connect to the database, and the mySQL docs have a
good section on the SQL itself, for how to get information out and put
information into the database. Access is only good for very very low usage
sites, its probably the worst option there is for a database for the web.
It is designed for few concurrent users, and isn't particularly fast, so
even a moderately sized website would end up slowed down with failing
requests to the database. As you're in Unix anyway, Access is well out of
its native environment, and if they have webservers with PHP the chances are
that they already have mySQL on the server. Basically, it is well worth the
extra initial effort to learn how to use mySQL effectively.
Also, all my clients use unix servers so, after a little research, I
have come to the conclusion that PHP is my only option - is this the
correct assumption?
There are other options, but PHP is the most common for good reason. The
other common scripting is ASP, but support for than on Unix isn't brilliant,
and with PHP available theres no reason to use ASP.
So, my main question is: can I use Access and PHP together? And, if
I can, could anyone recommend a good tutorial/book I can follow to get
me started?


Yes is the simple answer, but its really not a great idea to do so. Use
PHP, use mySQL, and personally I found the documentation for both these
enough to make the database work - they include little examples of code
throughout so building up the code is very easy. If you do want a
full-blown tutorial, there will be a hell of a lot more inforamtion about
PHP+mySQL than PHP+Access.

David
Jul 16 '05 #8
Jo
Thanks everyone for your enthusiastic replies to my post.

So...you've convinced me! I'm going to take your advice and leave
Access well alone. However, can I learn PHP and MySQL at the same
time? Should I devote all my energy to learning one at a time
instead?

Thanks again!

Jo
Jul 16 '05 #9
Message-ID: <14**************************@posting.google.com > from Jo
contained the following:

So...you've convinced me! I'm going to take your advice and leave
Access well alone. However, can I learn PHP and MySQL at the same
time? Should I devote all my energy to learning one at a time
instead?


No one can know what your skill level is or to what level of complexity you
wish to work. The rabbit hole goes on forever.

For single table stuff you could be running queries in an hour or so.
However if your programming skills are minimal you would be better doing a
few exercises first. There are plenty of 'introduction to php' tutorials
out there. I recommend the webmonkey ones.

Setting up databases in MySql is a lot easier if you have phpMyadmin
enabled but it still requires a bit more savvy than basic Access IMO. That
said, once you get the hang of it I find it's often easier.
--
Geoff Berrow
It's only Usenet, no one dies.
My opinions, not the committee's, mine.
Simple RFDs http://www.ckdog.co.uk/rfdmaker/
Jul 16 '05 #10
Jo
Thanks Geoff - I will take your advice and start with the webmonkey
tutorials on php.

Jo
Jul 16 '05 #11

This thread has been closed and replies have been disabled. Please start a new discussion.

Similar topics

0
by: Rupe | last post by:
I have a web site on a remote, shared host with a bunch of individual Access databases. I want to switch my databases from Access to MS SQL and have some questions. I update some of my Access...
27
by: Chuck Grimsby | last post by:
(Repost, due to lack of submissions...) The Microsoft Access Product Group (the people who build Microsoft Access) want your help! One of the main things we're working on for the near future...
3
by: Robin | last post by:
Hi all, I'm working with a VB app, using DAO 3.6, that used to generate Access '97 databases using the following code: Set dbsNew = wrkDefault.CreateDatabase(strLPAccessInv, dbLangGeneral,...
1
by: Mike | last post by:
Hi Hi We are currently upgrading from access 97 to office 2003 on site. We would like to upgrade our access databases to Access 2003 but we wish to remove Microsoft access software from our end...
1
by: com | last post by:
Extreme Web Reports 2005 - Soft30.com The wizard scans the specified MS Access database and records information such as report names, parameters and subqueries. ......
17
by: Mell via AccessMonster.com | last post by:
Is there a way to find out where an application was created from? i.e. - work or home i.e. - if application sits on a (work) server/network, the IT people know the application is sitting...
9
by: Wayne Smith | last post by:
I've come up against a major headache that I can't seem to find a solution for but I'm sure there must be a workaround and I would really be grateful of any help. I'm currently building a web...
5
by: Anns via AccessMonster.com | last post by:
My establishment has about 20 ms access db's that will be converted over (see subject). When we pull all the BE's over to SQL and the FE's on Sharepoint (.net) surely we don't have to change...
12
by: Earl Anderson | last post by:
Recently, as I was 'flipping thru the TV channels', I heard some woman on a CSpan show 'chiding' the federal government for using MS Access for maintaining records on tracking something (I can't...
0
by: adstheman | last post by:
Hi all, I am maintaining a group of applications which share Access databases. In the newer version of the software products we have upgraded from DAO to ADO and also implemented routines to...
0
by: taylorcarr | last post by:
A Canon printer is a smart device known for being advanced, efficient, and reliable. It is designed for home, office, and hybrid workspace use and can also be used for a variety of purposes. However,...
0
by: ryjfgjl | last post by:
If we have dozens or hundreds of excel to import into the database, if we use the excel import function provided by database editors such as navicat, it will be extremely tedious and time-consuming...
0
by: ryjfgjl | last post by:
In our work, we often receive Excel tables with data in the same format. If we want to analyze these data, it can be difficult to analyze them because the data is spread across multiple Excel files...
0
BarryA
by: BarryA | last post by:
What are the essential steps and strategies outlined in the Data Structures and Algorithms (DSA) roadmap for aspiring data scientists? How can individuals effectively utilize this roadmap to progress...
1
by: Sonnysonu | last post by:
This is the data of csv file 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 2 3 2 3 3 the lengths should be different i have to store the data by column-wise with in the specific length. suppose the i have to...
0
marktang
by: marktang | last post by:
ONU (Optical Network Unit) is one of the key components for providing high-speed Internet services. Its primary function is to act as an endpoint device located at the user's premises. However,...
0
by: Hystou | last post by:
Most computers default to English, but sometimes we require a different language, especially when relocating. Forgot to request a specific language before your computer shipped? No problem! You can...
0
Oralloy
by: Oralloy | last post by:
Hello folks, I am unable to find appropriate documentation on the type promotion of bit-fields when using the generalised comparison operator "<=>". The problem is that using the GNU compilers,...
0
by: Hystou | last post by:
Overview: Windows 11 and 10 have less user interface control over operating system update behaviour than previous versions of Windows. In Windows 11 and 10, there is no way to turn off the Windows...

By using Bytes.com and it's services, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

To disable or enable advertisements and analytics tracking please visit the manage ads & tracking page.