By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
432,247 Members | 871 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 432,247 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

Range Scan Cost Fluctuations

P: n/a
Dan
I am a relatively new user on Oracle 9.2.0.1 and I am having trouble
performance tuning this production database.

I am running a large query that joins two tables, document(3 mil) and
entity(9 mil). I have reorganized my tablespaces so that the two
tables are on different tablespaces, different disks. They both have
their indexes stored on a third tablespace. Before reconfiguring the
production database, I was getting a range scan on index ix_document_8
that had a cost of 25. Now that I have reconfigured the prod
database, the cost of the range scan has gone through the roof, 5933.

I have tried moving this one particular index to different tablespaces
on all three disks available to me to no avail. I run "analyze index
compute statistics;" on the index after every time I recreate it. It
appears that no matter where I create this index it still has trouble
accessing it. I have computed the statistics for the table before
computing the index statistics. It appears to me that there is an I/O
problem here. Why did it cost so little before and now it costs so
much to access it?

Should the index be on the same disk/different tablespace?
Different disk/different tablespace?

I have run out of my testing capabilities here to try and troubleshoot
why the cost is so high. Could this be a problem with my CBO?

Any help is greatly appreciated,
-Dan
Jul 19 '05 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
3 Replies


P: n/a
do*****@amcad.com (Dan) wrote in message news:<bd**************************@posting.google. com>...
I am a relatively new user on Oracle 9.2.0.1 and I am having trouble
performance tuning this production database.

I am running a large query that joins two tables, document(3 mil) and
entity(9 mil). I have reorganized my tablespaces so that the two
tables are on different tablespaces, different disks. They both have
their indexes stored on a third tablespace. Before reconfiguring the
production database, I was getting a range scan on index ix_document_8
that had a cost of 25. Now that I have reconfigured the prod
database, the cost of the range scan has gone through the roof, 5933.

I have tried moving this one particular index to different tablespaces
on all three disks available to me to no avail. I run "analyze index
compute statistics;" on the index after every time I recreate it. It
appears that no matter where I create this index it still has trouble
accessing it. I have computed the statistics for the table before
computing the index statistics. It appears to me that there is an I/O
problem here. Why did it cost so little before and now it costs so
much to access it?

Should the index be on the same disk/different tablespace?
Different disk/different tablespace?

I have run out of my testing capabilities here to try and troubleshoot
why the cost is so high. Could this be a problem with my CBO?

Any help is greatly appreciated,
-Dan


Dan, if the explan plan show the same access path for the query after
you moved the indexes and reanalyzed the table/indexes then the odds
are that the statistics were out of data prior to your re-calculating
them. In other words you are looking at the true cost. Is there a
difference in run time, or just in the cost shown by the explain
plans?

Also, are or did you use constants in one plan and bind variables in
another? There can be major differences in the plan chosen and cost
based on the difference in the CBO generates because of the difference
in information the two options provide the optimizer.

HTH -- Mark D Powell --
Jul 19 '05 #2

P: n/a
Dan
Thanks for the response Mark.

I looked into the problem a little further and found that the
difference comes down to two parts of the WHERE clause. When these
two values are NOT sent as bind variables, the cost goes way down. I
realize that cost is an arbitrary number. I looked at the number of
consistent gets and there was a large difference (factor of 10x) when
I was sending these two conditions as bind variables. My problem is,
since the database has to run with CURSOR_SHARING=SIMILIAR (I'll be
arm wrestling our developers over their lack of bind variable usage) I
don't see a way to get around this issue.

I have a couple of books that explicitly say that if you are not using
bind variables from the application side, the CBO can't be guaranteed
to produce predictable/consistent executions. Am I up the creek here
because of this? I am forcing index usage using hints, as well as
ORDERED to make sure the join is done in the proper order. Is there
any way that you know of that I could selectively turn the
CURSOR_SHARING off for part of the query? Some sort of escape
characters of some sort that tell Oracle that I don't want it to bind
these particular variables, but bind the rest of the query?

I know that this is all patchwork, but I have an angry customer and
there is no way the entire application can be changed for the
deadline. Any ideas?

Thanks for the help,
-Dan
Ma*********@eds.com (Mark D Powell) wrote in message news:<26**************************@posting.google. com>...
do*****@amcad.com (Dan) wrote in message news:<bd**************************@posting.google. com>...
I am a relatively new user on Oracle 9.2.0.1 and I am having trouble
performance tuning this production database.

I am running a large query that joins two tables, document(3 mil) and
entity(9 mil). I have reorganized my tablespaces so that the two
tables are on different tablespaces, different disks. They both have
their indexes stored on a third tablespace. Before reconfiguring the
production database, I was getting a range scan on index ix_document_8
that had a cost of 25. Now that I have reconfigured the prod
database, the cost of the range scan has gone through the roof, 5933.

I have tried moving this one particular index to different tablespaces
on all three disks available to me to no avail. I run "analyze index
compute statistics;" on the index after every time I recreate it. It
appears that no matter where I create this index it still has trouble
accessing it. I have computed the statistics for the table before
computing the index statistics. It appears to me that there is an I/O
problem here. Why did it cost so little before and now it costs so
much to access it?

Should the index be on the same disk/different tablespace?
Different disk/different tablespace?

I have run out of my testing capabilities here to try and troubleshoot
why the cost is so high. Could this be a problem with my CBO?

Any help is greatly appreciated,
-Dan


Dan, if the explan plan show the same access path for the query after
you moved the indexes and reanalyzed the table/indexes then the odds
are that the statistics were out of data prior to your re-calculating
them. In other words you are looking at the true cost. Is there a
difference in run time, or just in the cost shown by the explain
plans?

Also, are or did you use constants in one plan and bind variables in
another? There can be major differences in the plan chosen and cost
based on the difference in the CBO generates because of the difference
in information the two options provide the optimizer.

HTH -- Mark D Powell --

Jul 19 '05 #3

P: n/a
do*****@amcad.com (Dan) wrote in message news:<bd**************************@posting.google. com>...
Thanks for the response Mark.

I looked into the problem a little further and found that the
difference comes down to two parts of the WHERE clause. When these
two values are NOT sent as bind variables, the cost goes way down. I
realize that cost is an arbitrary number. I looked at the number of
consistent gets and there was a large difference (factor of 10x) when
I was sending these two conditions as bind variables. My problem is,
since the database has to run with CURSOR_SHARING=SIMILIAR (I'll be
arm wrestling our developers over their lack of bind variable usage) I
don't see a way to get around this issue.

I have a couple of books that explicitly say that if you are not using
bind variables from the application side, the CBO can't be guaranteed
to produce predictable/consistent executions. Am I up the creek here
because of this? I am forcing index usage using hints, as well as
ORDERED to make sure the join is done in the proper order. Is there
any way that you know of that I could selectively turn the
CURSOR_SHARING off for part of the query? Some sort of escape
characters of some sort that tell Oracle that I don't want it to bind
these particular variables, but bind the rest of the query?

I know that this is all patchwork, but I have an angry customer and
there is no way the entire application can be changed for the
deadline. Any ideas?

Thanks for the help,
-Dan
Ma*********@eds.com (Mark D Powell) wrote in message news:<26**************************@posting.google. com>...
do*****@amcad.com (Dan) wrote in message news:<bd**************************@posting.google. com>...
I am a relatively new user on Oracle 9.2.0.1 and I am having trouble
performance tuning this production database.

I am running a large query that joins two tables, document(3 mil) and
entity(9 mil). I have reorganized my tablespaces so that the two
tables are on different tablespaces, different disks. They both have
their indexes stored on a third tablespace. Before reconfiguring the
production database, I was getting a range scan on index ix_document_8
that had a cost of 25. Now that I have reconfigured the prod
database, the cost of the range scan has gone through the roof, 5933.

I have tried moving this one particular index to different tablespaces
on all three disks available to me to no avail. I run "analyze index
compute statistics;" on the index after every time I recreate it. It
appears that no matter where I create this index it still has trouble
accessing it. I have computed the statistics for the table before
computing the index statistics. It appears to me that there is an I/O
problem here. Why did it cost so little before and now it costs so
much to access it?

Should the index be on the same disk/different tablespace?
Different disk/different tablespace?

I have run out of my testing capabilities here to try and troubleshoot
why the cost is so high. Could this be a problem with my CBO?

Any help is greatly appreciated,
-Dan


Dan, if the explan plan show the same access path for the query after
you moved the indexes and reanalyzed the table/indexes then the odds
are that the statistics were out of data prior to your re-calculating
them. In other words you are looking at the true cost. Is there a
difference in run time, or just in the cost shown by the explain
plans?

Also, are or did you use constants in one plan and bind variables in
another? There can be major differences in the plan chosen and cost
based on the difference in the CBO generates because of the difference
in information the two options provide the optimizer.

HTH -- Mark D Powell --


When you submit SQL to the rdbms or run an explain the plans produced
for the same SQL except for where a constant is used in one and a bind
variable is used in the other may be very different. Since the CBO
does not know the value of the variable it works with certain
assumptions. When a constant is provided it knows more and does
things differently. Also constants enable the use of histograms if
they exist on the referenced column while bind variables do not.

If the data is skewed (example only 6 distinct values and 1 value
accounts for 80% of the data) then the CBO plan will probably ignore
an index on this column. The developer will then run a test using one
of the 5 rare values either using a constant, the RULE hint, or an
index hint and complain about the CBO. However, if you run the SQL
with the index hint and use the 80% of the rows data value the query
performance is likely to be very, very bad. In this case the CBO
produces a consistent plan but it is non-optimal for the minority of
rows.

To solve a problem like the above one possibility is to code an IF so
that if the program variable value is the 80% value to let the CBO
have the SQL as is otherwise to submit the SQL with an index hint.

In your case I suggest the following (if my post is not to late to
help)
make sure the statistics are current

try to determine why the CBO is not choosing the index you think
should be used. The most common reasons for this are join order,
instead of A to B to C the CBO is B to C to A making the index from A
to B unusable, and join method such as hash join or merge join instead
of a nested loop that would make the path available. Sometime just
rearranging the query can fix this; if not then the ORDERED and USE_NL
hints usually will.

Check for skewed data. The idea above where you have to test the
value to be used in the query and provide hinted SQL might be an
option in this case. Alternately rewriting the query to use an inline
view and some of the hints above might be enough to make the desired
plan available.

1- Make sure the SQL does not force reading the same table more than
once where one time through would be enough

2- that all necessary join conditions are present

3- try to make sure filtering conditions are applied early in the join
order

HTH -- Mark D Powell --
Jul 19 '05 #4

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.