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Cross platform XML?

P: n/a
Are there any good websites or books that deal with cross platform XML? I'd
like to target Internet Explorer/Netscape Navigator 5 or later, as well as
Opera, possibly konqueror on Linux as well.

OT: I'm also looking for books and websites for cross platform XHTML and
DHTML.
Jul 20 '05 #1
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7 Replies


P: n/a
I really don't understand your question, but I would suggest looking at:

http://www.xml.org/xml/resources_cover.shtml
http://www.ibiblio.org/xml/books.html

Both the parent sites for the aforementioned links are also two good
places to get some great information.

and finally:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...understxml.asp

Good luck.

-C...

Web Master wrote:
Are there any good websites or books that deal with cross platform XML? I'd
like to target Internet Explorer/Netscape Navigator 5 or later, as well as
Opera, possibly konqueror on Linux as well.

OT: I'm also looking for books and websites for cross platform XHTML and
DHTML.


Jul 20 '05 #2

P: n/a
Hi,

XML is inherently cross platform - thats why everyone is having a cow about
it just now.
If your wanting to target different browsers, then you are looking at using
the following techs at a minimum:
XML and XHTML (just a version of html that doesnt allow sloppy code). If you
were thinking about doing this for real you need to look at XSLT. Buy
altovas products and get some other decent web editor. I prefer the studio
MX suite from macromedia

Chow

Simon
Jul 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
After a long battle with technology,"Simon Harvey" <sh856531@microsofts_free_emal_service.com>, an earthling, wrote:
XML is inherently cross platform - thats why everyone is having a cow about
it just now.


That's typically a nonsequitor.

XML-based applications are commonly only implemented on one platform,
and for any given XML document, it is entirely possible that the only
application that has been written to use that document (DTD/schema)
runs on a single platform.

For instance, any of Microsoft's XML support has solely been written
for their Windows platform.

If you have a "BizTalk" document, it's more than likely that the only
place it's useful is when interpreted by a Microsoft BizTalk server.
--
output = reverse("gro.gultn" "@" "enworbbc")
http://cbbrowne.com/info/msprobs.html
Rules of the Evil Overlord #30. "All bumbling conjurers, clumsy
squires, no-talent bards, and cowardly thieves in the land will be
preemptively put to death. My foes will surely give up and abandon
their quest if they have no source of comic relief."
<http://www.eviloverlord.com/>
Jul 20 '05 #4

P: n/a
On 28 Jul 2003 11:47:39 GMT, Christopher Browne <cb******@acm.org>
wrote:
After a long battle with technology,"Simon Harvey" <sh856531@microsofts_free_emal_service.com>, an earthling, wrote:
XML is inherently cross platform - thats why everyone is having a cow about
it just now.
That's typically a nonsequitor.

Actually, it isn't - XML is cross-platform (but particular XML
applications may not be).
XML-based applications are commonly only implemented on one platform,
and for any given XML document, it is entirely possible that the only
application that has been written to use that document (DTD/schema)
runs on a single platform.
Again, here is the problem you seem to be having. XML is **not** the
application, it is the data format and the data format most definately
**is** cross-platform, even if the application software is not.
For instance, any of Microsoft's XML support has solely been written
for their Windows platform.
Also not true. For example, Microsoft Word (especially in later
versions) can write XML formatted documents rather than the
proprietary "DOC" format and I can (and do) read those in Open Office
on both Windows and Linux systems.
If you have a "BizTalk" document, it's more than likely that the only
place it's useful is when interpreted by a Microsoft BizTalk server.

BizTalk, to be blunt, is dead. It was only ever a Microsoft
proprietary method that tried (unsuccessfully) to make parts of the
XML standard into "Redmond-only" versions, much as they did with Java,
browser Javascript and others.

This time, it failed and Microsoft have abandoned BizTalk.
--
Mark A. Preston, The Magpie's Nest, Lancashire, UK
Website : www.magpiesnest.co.uk
Jul 20 '05 #5

P: n/a
Web Master wrote:
Are there any good websites or books that deal with cross platform XML? I'd
like to target Internet Explorer/Netscape Navigator 5 or later, as well as
Opera, possibly konqueror on Linux as well.


If you want to use XML and be cross-browser, use XML on the server-side
and do a transformation to a cross-browser format (HTML 4.01 or XHTML
1.0). Btw, there is no Netscape Navigator version 5 release.
--
Johannes Koch
In te domine speravi; non confundar in aeternum.
(Te Deum, 4th cent.)

Jul 20 '05 #6

P: n/a
Hi there,

I don't have any advice on cross platform XML. XML is inherently cross
platform. The tools are not, though, currently.

For the PC the usual tool is XML Spy, www.xmlspy.com

For the Mac, there is ElfData XML Editor, from
www.elfdata.com/xmleditor/

For Linux, I'm not sure.

"Web Master" <we*@master.org> wrote in message news:<q6******************@twister.socal.rr.com>.. .
Are there any good websites or books that deal with cross platform XML? I'd
like to target Internet Explorer/Netscape Navigator 5 or later, as well as
Opera, possibly konqueror on Linux as well.

OT: I'm also looking for books and websites for cross platform XHTML and
DHTML.

Jul 20 '05 #7

P: n/a
"Alan J. Flavell" <fl*****@mail.cern.ch> wrote in message
news:Pi******************************@lxplus093.ce rn.ch...
That doesn't say to me that in the absence of a BOM [parsers] must be able
to deduce the [UTF-16] encoding.


True, even though the non-normative part explains in detail how to do it,
you're right, one can't depend on it.
It's a given in XML. If it isn't declared as anything else and it isn't
UTF-16, it's UTF-8.


I can't argue with that. I'm afraid that comment of mine was a
more-general one, not specific to the XML context, but I failed to
make that clear.


It's clear now.

Actually, it's great to have a clear and unambiguous spec to cite. You are
right to be precise. That's the glue that holds us all together.

Bob Foster

http://www.xmlbuddy.com/
http://bobfoster.com/blog/
http://bobfoster.com/plog/
Jul 20 '05 #8

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