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Where is a control's parameter list documented?

P: n/a
One question I have not figured out is how to learn which event parameter
list is supported by a control? EventArgs, CommandEventArgs, what?

Aug 16 '08 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
On Sat, 16 Aug 2008 16:04:23 -0500, "HillBilly"
<so******@somewhere.comwrote:
>One question I have not figured out is how to learn which event parameter
list is supported by a control? EventArgs, CommandEventArgs, what?
I'm not sure I understand your question. I don't think the list of
all event parameters used by a control is a useful thing to know.

A control raises some number of events. When the handler for an event
is called, an event parameter is passed. Each event has a specific
parameter type.

If you want to know which parameter a specific event uses, you can
either look it up in the documentation, or code the parameter as
something clearly illegal like 'string' and the compiler error message
will tell you what is expected (unless you are using VB with OPTION
STRICT OFF, in which case you need to bit the bullet and change to
OPTION STRICT ON).
Aug 17 '08 #2

P: n/a
"Jack Jackson" <jj******@cinnovations.netwrote in message
news:30********************************@4ax.com...
On Sat, 16 Aug 2008 16:04:23 -0500, "HillBilly"
<so******@somewhere.comwrote:
>>One question I have not figured out is how to learn which event parameter
list is supported by a control? EventArgs, CommandEventArgs, what?

I'm not sure I understand your question. I don't think the list of
all event parameters used by a control is a useful thing to know.

A control raises some number of events. When the handler for an event
is called, an event parameter is passed. Each event has a specific
parameter type.

If you want to know which parameter a specific event uses, you can
either look it up in the documentation, or code the parameter as
something clearly illegal like 'string' and the compiler error message
will tell you what is expected (unless you are using VB with OPTION
STRICT OFF, in which case you need to bit the bullet and change to
OPTION STRICT ON).
Looking --it-- up in documentation is the task I'm trying to determine Jack.
Here and there I see a parameter list mentioned in he documentation; not
clearly identified as such and then not consistently as every event of every
method appears to support at least two parameters. Since there are different
parameter names and types I've remained uninformed and have relied on
Intellisense to give me some kind of clue but not much can be inferred from
Intellisense.

It would be very useful IMO if this context of passing arguments using
parameters were documented better as clearly the construct is fundamental to
the method or it would not be used at all so why not then expound on the
scope of the types we may only infer by reading some arbitrary name; and an
arbitrary name that does not lead anywhere specific in the current
documentation as my meager attempts to find have failed to produce in any
circumstance but accidently.

Aug 18 '08 #3

P: n/a
On Mon, 18 Aug 2008 09:51:09 -0500, "HillBilly"
<so******@somewhere.comwrote:
>"Jack Jackson" <jj******@cinnovations.netwrote in message
news:30********************************@4ax.com.. .
>On Sat, 16 Aug 2008 16:04:23 -0500, "HillBilly"
<so******@somewhere.comwrote:
>>>One question I have not figured out is how to learn which event parameter
list is supported by a control? EventArgs, CommandEventArgs, what?

I'm not sure I understand your question. I don't think the list of
all event parameters used by a control is a useful thing to know.

A control raises some number of events. When the handler for an event
is called, an event parameter is passed. Each event has a specific
parameter type.

If you want to know which parameter a specific event uses, you can
either look it up in the documentation, or code the parameter as
something clearly illegal like 'string' and the compiler error message
will tell you what is expected (unless you are using VB with OPTION
STRICT OFF, in which case you need to bit the bullet and change to
OPTION STRICT ON).

Looking --it-- up in documentation is the task I'm trying to determine Jack.
Here and there I see a parameter list mentioned in he documentation; not
clearly identified as such and then not consistently as every event of every
method appears to support at least two parameters. Since there are different
parameter names and types I've remained uninformed and have relied on
Intellisense to give me some kind of clue but not much can be inferred from
Intellisense.

It would be very useful IMO if this context of passing arguments using
parameters were documented better as clearly the construct is fundamental to
the method or it would not be used at all so why not then expound on the
scope of the types we may only infer by reading some arbitrary name; and an
arbitrary name that does not lead anywhere specific in the current
documentation as my meager attempts to find have failed to produce in any
circumstance but accidently.
Sorry, I don't understand what the problem is. Can you give an
example?
Aug 18 '08 #4

P: n/a

"Jack Jackson" <jj******@cinnovations.netwrote in message
news:mh********************************@4ax.com...
On Mon, 18 Aug 2008 09:51:09 -0500, "HillBilly"
<so******@somewhere.comwrote:
>>"Jack Jackson" <jj******@cinnovations.netwrote in message
news:30********************************@4ax.com. ..
>>On Sat, 16 Aug 2008 16:04:23 -0500, "HillBilly"
<so******@somewhere.comwrote:

One question I have not figured out is how to learn which event
parameter
list is supported by a control? EventArgs, CommandEventArgs, what?

I'm not sure I understand your question. I don't think the list of
all event parameters used by a control is a useful thing to know.

A control raises some number of events. When the handler for an event
is called, an event parameter is passed. Each event has a specific
parameter type.

If you want to know which parameter a specific event uses, you can
either look it up in the documentation, or code the parameter as
something clearly illegal like 'string' and the compiler error message
will tell you what is expected (unless you are using VB with OPTION
STRICT OFF, in which case you need to bit the bullet and change to
OPTION STRICT ON).

Looking --it-- up in documentation is the task I'm trying to determine
Jack.
Here and there I see a parameter list mentioned in he documentation; not
clearly identified as such and then not consistently as every event of
every
method appears to support at least two parameters. Since there are
different
parameter names and types I've remained uninformed and have relied on
Intellisense to give me some kind of clue but not much can be inferred
from
Intellisense.

It would be very useful IMO if this context of passing arguments using
parameters were documented better as clearly the construct is fundamental
to
the method or it would not be used at all so why not then expound on the
scope of the types we may only infer by reading some arbitrary name; and
an
arbitrary name that does not lead anywhere specific in the current
documentation as my meager attempts to find have failed to produce in any
circumstance but accidently.

Sorry, I don't understand what the problem is. Can you give an
example?
Noting I'm still trying to make sense of delegates and events I refer to the
earlier examples I mentioned such as EventArgs, CommandEventArgs and the
many other such "type" I see used with the actual parameter e.

Aug 18 '08 #5

P: n/a

So you want to understand the arguments of the events that are raised.
Use the MSDN documentation - Go to Help..Index in VS. Search for the
event name. Select the item from the left column of the results with the
event name followed by the word "event." It will tell you the event
type, which in turn will tell you the argument types.

For example, say you want to see what the parameters are for the
ListBox.SelectedIndexChanged event. Search for "SelectedIndexChanged"
then click "SelectedIndexChanged event" in the results . It details that
the event is of type "EventHandler". Clicking on EventHandler takes you
to the EventHandler page, where you can see that the specific object
parameter is of type EventArgs.

A better example - the ItemDataBound event of a repeater control.
Looking up Repeater.ItemDataBound, I find that the event is of type
RepeaterItemEventHandler. Clicking the type takes me to its definition
page where I can see that the specific object argument is of type
RepeaterItemEventArgs.
--
breitak67
Aug 19 '08 #6

P: n/a

"breitak67" <gu***@unknown-email.comwrote in message
news:0b******************************@nntp-gateway.com...
>
So you want to understand the arguments of the events that are raised.
Use the MSDN documentation - Go to Help..Index in VS. Search for the
event name. Select the item from the left column of the results with the
event name followed by the word "event." It will tell you the event
type, which in turn will tell you the argument types.

For example, say you want to see what the parameters are for the
ListBox.SelectedIndexChanged event. Search for "SelectedIndexChanged"
then click "SelectedIndexChanged event" in the results . It details that
the event is of type "EventHandler". Clicking on EventHandler takes you
to the EventHandler page, where you can see that the specific object
parameter is of type EventArgs.

A better example - the ItemDataBound event of a repeater control.
Looking up Repeater.ItemDataBound, I find that the event is of type
RepeaterItemEventHandler. Clicking the type takes me to its definition
page where I can see that the specific object argument is of type
RepeaterItemEventArgs.
--
breitak67
Very insightful thank you. The walk-through also shows the term "event" is
categorized as "Syntax" which answers one of my questions "where in the
documentation" such information is categorized and expected to be found.
Aug 19 '08 #7

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