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If not .Net then what?

P: n/a
jim
In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and Xenocode,
it was pointed out that there may be better programming languages/IDEs to
use for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps.

My goal is to create desktop applications for use on Windows XP+ OSs that
are distributed as single executables that do not require traditional
install packages to run.

I would like to use a drag and drop UI development tool like the .Net IDE
(or the old VB6) to make development as easy as possible. I am a hobbyist
programmer and would like to put out some useful apps, but I don't want to
have to become an expert at a complex language like C++ to do so reliably.

More than one person responding to the previous thread held the opinion that
..Net was great for corporate environments where all PCs are strictly
regulated, but may not be the best option to develop the type of apps that I
would like to develop for the PC community at large.

So what, in your opinion, would be a good alternative to use to develop the
type of applications that I am trying to develop?

jim
Dec 28 '07 #1
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184 Replies

P: n/a
jim wrote:
In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and Xenocode,
it was pointed out that there may be better programming languages/IDEs to
use for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps.

My goal is to create desktop applications for use on Windows XP+ OSs that
are distributed as single executables that do not require traditional
install packages to run.

I would like to use a drag and drop UI development tool like the .Net IDE
(or the old VB6) to make development as easy as possible. I am a hobbyist
programmer and would like to put out some useful apps, but I don't want to
have to become an expert at a complex language like C++ to do so reliably.

More than one person responding to the previous thread held the opinion that
.Net was great for corporate environments where all PCs are strictly
regulated, but may not be the best option to develop the type of apps that I
would like to develop for the PC community at large.

So what, in your opinion, would be a good alternative to use to develop the
type of applications that I am trying to develop?
I think you should stick to C# (or VB.NET if you so prefer). Just
consider not targeting the latest and greatest .NET version.

Since Win2003 Windows does come with .NET preinstalled and it
is pushed out to Windows XP via Windows Update.

I believe you can even distribute the runtime with your app.

Unless your app specifically targets users with old Windows
version and/or slow dialup internet connections, then I can not
see a problem going with .NET !

Arne
Dec 28 '07 #2

P: n/a
The .NET framework should be installed on every Windows XP machine that is
kept updated. That means you don't have to create an installer package. You
can distribute the executable alone and it should work fine. Vista machines
have the .NET framework pre-installed.

The only objection to the .NET framework I've heard is from people who say
they don't want some big runtime library installed on their pc's. But what
do they think Windows itself is? It's a big runtime library that every
windows application ever written requires to run. The .NET framework is just
a few extra DLL's in the System32 directory.

I use primarily use VB for all my development. Every now & then some dummy
will email me and with "why don't you write a version of this program that
doesn't require the .NET framework?" And I'll respond with "why don't you
write it yourself?"

I use VB not because i'm stupid, but because I'm lazy. I like that I can
whip out a windows form in a few seconds and use the various built-in
functions and classes to do the work that I want done. I've been known to
get a quick app done in 15 minutes when someone says "I need a utility to do
this...". Using a non-ide language like gcc or other command-line compilers
doesn't make any sense to me. It's a time waster.

If I need to make a program that works without the .NET framework (one
that'll run on a BartPE bootable CD, for example) then I use BCX. But to
design the form, I use VB6 to create the .frm file, and use a program I
wrote to convert the .frm file into the BCX code needed to create the form
at runtime.

So it's up to you. Use whatever you're comfortable with and don't listen to
people who have pre-conceived ideas about your language of choice.

"jim" <ji*@home.netwrote in message
news:Oz*******************@bignews7.bellsouth.net. ..
In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and Xenocode,
it was pointed out that there may be better programming languages/IDEs to
use for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps.

My goal is to create desktop applications for use on Windows XP+ OSs that
are distributed as single executables that do not require traditional
install packages to run.

I would like to use a drag and drop UI development tool like the .Net IDE
(or the old VB6) to make development as easy as possible. I am a hobbyist
programmer and would like to put out some useful apps, but I don't want to
have to become an expert at a complex language like C++ to do so reliably.

More than one person responding to the previous thread held the opinion
that .Net was great for corporate environments where all PCs are strictly
regulated, but may not be the best option to develop the type of apps that
I would like to develop for the PC community at large.

So what, in your opinion, would be a good alternative to use to develop
the type of applications that I am trying to develop?

jim

Dec 28 '07 #3

P: n/a
[followups set to comp.programming, where I'm reading this thread]

Terry Olsen said:

<snip>
The only objection to the .NET framework I've heard is from people who
say they don't want some big runtime library installed on their pc's.
Another objection is that it's slow. The first program I moved to .Net ran
around 60 times slower than native - way too slow to be useful.

A third objection is that it's non-portable. Even if I were of a mind to
run .Net programs under Linux, I couldn't actually do so - at least, not
yet. Mono promises to sort that out... oonnee ddaayy...... but in the
meantime Linux users would rather have something that actually works.

<snip>
I use VB not because i'm stupid, but because I'm lazy.
Being even lazier than you, I use C++ Builder for those rare occasions when
I need to write a Windows program. Because I'm so lazy, though, I prefer
to use Linux, where almost everything is so much easier to do. (In the
interests of balance and fairness, I will of course concede that there are
some things that it's easier to do in Windows. But industrial-strength
programming isn't one of them.)
I like that I can
whip out a windows form in a few seconds and use the various built-in
functions and classes to do the work that I want done. I've been known to
get a quick app done in 15 minutes when someone says "I need a utility to
do this...".
What took you? My personal record for responding to such a request is 30
seconds (including compilation) for the first version, and another 60
seconds when the user suddenly decided to require some extra features.
Builder rocks like that. I recommend it to you - and it doesn't need that
silly .Net framework either.
Using a non-ide language like gcc or other command-line
compilers doesn't make any sense to me. It's a time waster.
I don't like wasting my time, which is why I use the best tool for the job.
Sometimes, that's an IDE tool like C++ Builder. But sometimes it's a
command-line tool. If you think command line compilers are a waste of
time, that suggests that you haven't much experience of life outside the
world of pointy-clicky.

<snip>
So it's up to you. Use whatever you're comfortable with and don't listen
to people who have pre-conceived ideas about your language of choice.
There, at least, I can agree with you.

--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Dec 28 '07 #4

P: n/a
Jim,

Honestly the application that you want to develop is from the previous
millennium from the time that Dos was reigning.

Now user's wants (while they tell that they do not), all kind of advanced
behaviour. That needs a lot of extra software for which the Net framework
is, it seems to me, the best solution today. You alone cannot create all the
classes which help us to make software today. The runtime of that software
(however not only that runtime, there is much more) is now in the Net
assemblies.

Another advance from Net related software is that it is easy to deploy
because the real application can be relative small because most people have
already the .Net versions and a Windows OS on their computer. The advance
from the Net versions is that it is undependable from the Windows OS that is
running. However not small as not any OS part is (and every runtime for
windows is).

Be aware that there never were really small applications that could run on
windows OS systems. An average VB6 was by instance much huger to deploy and
absolute not deployable with dialup connections. In past every (non
assembler type) program language had its own runtime even when big parts
were included in the OS (like in mainframes)

If you don't know why runtimes are build: First they appeared to overcome
every time repeated simple instructions as adding, which can be, without a
runtime, need real a lot of instructions, while in fact it is endless times
done in a program. This can be used of course for everything and is every
time done more.

I hope that this explains something to you.

Cor
Dec 28 '07 #5

P: n/a
Hi Jim,
More than one person responding to the previous thread held the opinion
that .Net was great for corporate environments where all PCs are strictly
regulated, but may not be the best option to develop the type of apps that
I would like to develop for the PC community at large.
that kind of opinion is often offered by people jealously guarding their
'corporate' pond and perks it offers. No matter what environment you are
developing for what matters is the quality and usefulness of your program.
It is much easier to conceal lousy workmanship in a corporate environment
where expressing an honest opinion may cost dearly.
I would like to use a drag and drop UI development tool like the .Net IDE
(or the old VB6) to make development as easy as possible.
Just don't it expect to think for you.
In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and Xenocode,
it was pointed out that there may be better programming languages/IDEs to
use for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps.
I never used Thininstall. Xenocode allows wrapping the whole application -
executables, Dlls, ActiveX, databases, INI or XML, plus, when necessary,
the whole .NET Framework, into a single executable. This executable can also
wrap registry entries. You can simply copy such an executable onto the hard
drive of the target machine without the traditional setup. This is
especially handy when the application includes an ActiveX that normally
would require registration on the target machine. I word of caution - if you
do it as hobby, it may cost you some money, besides the time and effort.

Michael

"jim" <ji*@home.netwrote in message
news:Oz*******************@bignews7.bellsouth.net. ..
In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and Xenocode,
it was pointed out that there may be better programming languages/IDEs to
use for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps.

My goal is to create desktop applications for use on Windows XP+ OSs that
are distributed as single executables that do not require traditional
install packages to run.

I would like to use a drag and drop UI development tool like the .Net IDE
(or the old VB6) to make development as easy as possible. I am a hobbyist
programmer and would like to put out some useful apps, but I don't want to
have to become an expert at a complex language like C++ to do so reliably.

More than one person responding to the previous thread held the opinion
that .Net was great for corporate environments where all PCs are strictly
regulated, but may not be the best option to develop the type of apps that
I would like to develop for the PC community at large.

So what, in your opinion, would be a good alternative to use to develop
the type of applications that I am trying to develop?

jim

Dec 28 '07 #6

P: n/a
In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and Xenocode, it
was pointed out that there may be better programming languages/IDEs to use
for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps.
Delphi 7 (newer versions are not as stable) does that very well.

--
Michael
----
http://michael.moreno.free.fr/
http://port.cogolin.free.fr/
Dec 28 '07 #7

P: n/a
Hi Jim,
>for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps
No application is standalone, every application has at least
an reference to the kernel dll and maybe to advapi, gdi, netapi
or user api. The only standalone application you can say is a real
standalone application would be a BIOS Code, Bootloader,
oskernel and code working in that space,...

..NET Framework is just fine, some additional dlls and a little
pe modification for such a great framework is more than acceptable!

Regards

Kerem

--
-----------------------
Beste Grsse / Best regards / Votre bien devoue
Kerem Gmrkc
Microsoft Live Space: http://kerem-g.spaces.live.com/
Latest Open-Source Projects: http://entwicklung.junetz.de
-----------------------
"This reply is provided as is, without warranty express or implied."
Dec 28 '07 #8

P: n/a
jim
Thanks!

I've seen Delphi pop up a lot in these conversations, but I was kind of
afraid that it may not be that reliable since Borland couldn't make a go of
it.

I'd hate to begin using a language/IDE and have the company supporting it go
under. It would just waste a lot of time that I could have spent learning
something else.

jim

"Michael Moreno" <My*******************@free.frwrote in message
news:mn***********************@free.fr...
>In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and
Xenocode, it was pointed out that there may be better programming
languages/IDEs to use for the purpose of creating standalone, single
executable apps.

Delphi 7 (newer versions are not as stable) does that very well.

--
Michael
----
http://michael.moreno.free.fr/
http://port.cogolin.free.fr/


Dec 28 '07 #9

P: n/a
Hi,
You can always use C++ and write unmanaged apps, if you only use win32 API
you know for sure that it will run always.


"jim" <ji*@home.netwrote in message
news:Oz*******************@bignews7.bellsouth.net. ..
In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and Xenocode,
it was pointed out that there may be better programming languages/IDEs to
use for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps.

My goal is to create desktop applications for use on Windows XP+ OSs that
are distributed as single executables that do not require traditional
install packages to run.

I would like to use a drag and drop UI development tool like the .Net IDE
(or the old VB6) to make development as easy as possible. I am a hobbyist
programmer and would like to put out some useful apps, but I don't want to
have to become an expert at a complex language like C++ to do so reliably.

More than one person responding to the previous thread held the opinion
that .Net was great for corporate environments where all PCs are strictly
regulated, but may not be the best option to develop the type of apps that
I would like to develop for the PC community at large.

So what, in your opinion, would be a good alternative to use to develop
the type of applications that I am trying to develop?

jim

--
Ignacio Machin
http://www.laceupsolutions.com
Mobile & warehouse Solutions.
Dec 28 '07 #10

P: n/a
[F-Us set to c.p]

Kerem Gmrkc said:
Hi Jim,
>>for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps

No application is standalone, every application has at least
an reference to the kernel dll and maybe to advapi, gdi, netapi
or user api.
Bear in mind that this thread is cross-posted. What you say may well be
true in Windows, but it is not true of all computer systems, and
especially embedded systems, which might be the *only* software running.
The only standalone application you can say is a real
standalone application would be a BIOS Code, Bootloader,
oskernel and code working in that space,...
It depends how pickily you're using the term "standalone". People nowadays
have a fairly loose definition of "standalone", as in "all I have to ship
is the .exe" - and under that definition, there's lots of scope for
standalone applications, even under Windows, let alone under Linux,
MS-DOS, and the Mac.
.NET Framework is just fine, some additional dlls and a little
pe modification for such a great framework is more than acceptable!
Ah, but here we must agree to differ. :-)

--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Dec 28 '07 #11

P: n/a
Hi Ignacio,
>You can always use C++ and write unmanaged apps, if you only use win32 API
you know for sure that it will run always.
as long as you use apis that are downward compatible and do not
depends on sh*** like mfc (anf if soyou need the rigth runtime) and
you target the right cpu (32/64), then you can run your code on any
windows,...if you target windows,..

But if you need indipendend runtimes then go write generic x86 asm and
store it in libs ond objectcode that you can compile into single exe image.
But i see only need for this if you need fast algo's and dont want to depend
on any runtime (c-runtime, mfc, msvb, et al,....)

Regards

Kerem

--
-----------------------
Beste Grsse / Best regards / Votre bien devoue
Kerem Gmrkc
Microsoft Live Space: http://kerem-g.spaces.live.com/
Latest Open-Source Projects: http://entwicklung.junetz.de
-----------------------
"This reply is provided as is, without warranty express or implied."
Dec 28 '07 #12

P: n/a
Bear in mind that this thread is cross-posted. What you say may well be
true in Windows, but it is not true of all computer systems, and
especially embedded systems, which might be the *only* software running.
The original post stated Windows XP or higher. The original post apparently
was written differently on the non-dotNet groups.
Dec 28 '07 #13

P: n/a
Jim,

On top of what has been said already you have very little to lose trying
..NET since the Express edition is free. There should be no concerning about
large required run times since they are most likely there already and if not
99% of users without the framework can install it quickly and easily.

To be honest (coming from a former long time Delphi developer) at this
moment in time .NET is an excellent, or should I say the best way to write
desktop applications. For someone just beginning you should have only a
short learning curve. As task become more complex you need look no farther
then these newsgroups for resources to questions which come either in the
form of expert responses or pointers to web sites which hold the key to your
issue at hand.

VB.NET or C#, that has already been hashed out high level. I like C# but my
agency settled on VB. Either one will get the common task done.

"jim" <ji*@home.netwrote in message
news:Oz*******************@bignews7.bellsouth.net. ..
In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and Xenocode,
it was pointed out that there may be better programming languages/IDEs to
use for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps.

My goal is to create desktop applications for use on Windows XP+ OSs that
are distributed as single executables that do not require traditional
install packages to run.

I would like to use a drag and drop UI development tool like the .Net IDE
(or the old VB6) to make development as easy as possible. I am a hobbyist
programmer and would like to put out some useful apps, but I don't want to
have to become an expert at a complex language like C++ to do so reliably.

More than one person responding to the previous thread held the opinion
that .Net was great for corporate environments where all PCs are strictly
regulated, but may not be the best option to develop the type of apps that
I would like to develop for the PC community at large.

So what, in your opinion, would be a good alternative to use to develop
the type of applications that I am trying to develop?

jim

Dec 28 '07 #14

P: n/a
Ignacio Machin ( .NET/ C# MVP ) wrote:
You can always use C++ and write unmanaged apps, if you only use win32 API
you know for sure that it will run always.
Only if you do not use features only available in newer windows
versions.

But admitteded the Win32 API is rather mature in not much
is added these days.

Arne
Dec 28 '07 #15

P: n/a
Hi Arne,

read my post above,...;-)

Regards

Kerem

--
-----------------------
Beste Grsse / Best regards / Votre bien devoue
Kerem Gmrkc
Microsoft Live Space: http://kerem-g.spaces.live.com/
Latest Open-Source Projects: http://entwicklung.junetz.de
-----------------------
"This reply is provided as is, without warranty express or implied."
Dec 28 '07 #16

P: n/a

"jim" <ji*@home.netwrote in message
news:eQ******************@bignews7.bellsouth.net.. .
Thanks!

I've seen Delphi pop up a lot in these conversations, but I was kind of
afraid that it may not be that reliable since Borland couldn't make a go
of it.

I'd hate to begin using a language/IDE and have the company supporting it
go under. It would just waste a lot of time that I could have spent
learning something else.

jim
If by "Borland couldn't make a go of it" you mean "Borland has developed 10+
versions of it over the span of 10+ years" then I guess you're right. I
started using Delphi 2.0 in 1997.

People have been predicting the demise of Delphi for years. The reality is,
it's a niche product that performs admirably for it's intended purpose. And
I think it would be great for someone who wants to create "standalone" Win32
apps. I would gauge it as "far superior" to VS up until VS 2003. I agree
with the previous poster who recommended Delphi 7. It's very stable. D8 was
a complete nightmare - so much so that I haven't tried any version since.

Further, you can supposedly port your code to linux fairly easily using
Kylix (Delphi for Linux), though I've never tried it (and neither did anyone
else, from what I can gather).

Dec 28 '07 #17

P: n/a
Richard Heathfield wrote:
>[followups set to comp.programming, where I'm reading this thread]
Changed back to include the groups more relevant for the question.
Terry Olsen said:
>The only objection to the .NET framework I've heard is from people who
say they don't want some big runtime library installed on their pc's.

Another objection is that it's slow. The first program I moved to .Net ran
around 60 times slower than native - way too slow to be useful.
I think you should spend a bit more time studying .NET !
A third objection is that it's non-portable.
Since the original poster stated:

#My goal is to create desktop applications for use on Windows XP+ OSs

Then that should not be a problem.
>I like that I can
whip out a windows form in a few seconds and use the various built-in
functions and classes to do the work that I want done. I've been known to
get a quick app done in 15 minutes when someone says "I need a utility to
do this...".

What took you? My personal record for responding to such a request is 30
seconds (including compilation) for the first version, and another 60
seconds when the user suddenly decided to require some extra features.
Builder rocks like that.
I am not particular impressed by either claim. If I had ever created
an app that fast I would try to keep it a secret - if you get my point.

Arne
Dec 28 '07 #18

P: n/a
Richard Heathfield wrote:
[F-Us set to c.p]
Set back again.
Kerem Gmrkc said:
>>for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps
No application is standalone, every application has at least
an reference to the kernel dll and maybe to advapi, gdi, netapi
or user api.

Bear in mind that this thread is cross-posted. What you say may well be
true in Windows, but it is not true of all computer systems, and
especially embedded systems, which might be the *only* software running.
The original post said:

#My goal is to create desktop applications for use on Windows XP+ OSs

So the assumption about Windows is fine.

I just don't think the original poster should have included
a group as general as comp.programming for a Windows specific
question.

Arne
Dec 28 '07 #19

P: n/a
Kerem Gmrkc wrote:
read my post above,...;-)
The one whre you for reasons unknown to me start to talk about MFC in
a Win32 API discusssion and use the term "Sh***", which I have no
idea about what means (the word that comes to my mind only has
4 letters not 5) ?

Arne
Dec 28 '07 #20

P: n/a
Arne Vajhj said:
Richard Heathfield wrote:
>Terry Olsen said:
>>The only objection to the .NET framework I've heard is from people who
say they don't want some big runtime library installed on their pc's.

Another objection is that it's slow. The first program I moved to .Net
ran around 60 times slower than native - way too slow to be useful.

I think you should spend a bit more time studying .NET !
Let me explain the background. We were developing an analysis product for a
UK bank, we already had working code, and we were asked to try our code
out under .Net - which we did. It ran sixty times slower. Our jaws
dropped, we laughed, and we didn't bother with .Net from then on. Ever.

If you're supposed to be hauling eight thousand tons of freight from London
to Newcastle, and the boss suggests you try using a bicycle instead of
your existing freight train, well, you might give it a go (because it's
the boss asking), but when it doesn't work it would be very silly to blame
yourself for not studying the bicycle enough. You just go back to your
freight train.

Same with .Net - we came, we saw, we laughed - and left.
>A third objection is that it's non-portable.

Since the original poster stated:

#My goal is to create desktop applications for use on Windows XP+ OSs

Then that should not be a problem.
Agreed. But I wasn't answering the OP. Rather, I was answering the person
who said "The only objection to the .NET framework I've heard is..." - so
I was just giving him a couple more to chew on.
>>I like that I can
whip out a windows form in a few seconds and use the various built-in
functions and classes to do the work that I want done. I've been known
to get a quick app done in 15 minutes when someone says "I need a
utility to do this...".

What took you? My personal record for responding to such a request is 30
seconds (including compilation) for the first version, and another 60
seconds when the user suddenly decided to require some extra features.
Builder rocks like that.

I am not particular impressed by either claim. If I had ever created
an app that fast I would try to keep it a secret - if you get my point.
Yeah, I can understand that, although there is something to be said for the
rapid development of cheesy little toys. Sometimes, they turn into Real
Programs that can be a real benefit to lots of users (at which point it
becomes worth writing them more - um - carefully, shall we say?).

--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Dec 28 '07 #21

P: n/a
Arne Vajhj said:
I just don't think the original poster should have included
a group as general as comp.programming for a Windows specific
question.
Precisely. I agree entirely.

--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Dec 28 '07 #22

P: n/a
jim

"Scott Roberts" <sr******@no.spam.here-webworks-software.comwrote in
message news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
>
"jim" <ji*@home.netwrote in message
news:eQ******************@bignews7.bellsouth.net.. .
>Thanks!

I've seen Delphi pop up a lot in these conversations, but I was kind of
afraid that it may not be that reliable since Borland couldn't make a go
of it.

I'd hate to begin using a language/IDE and have the company supporting it
go under. It would just waste a lot of time that I could have spent
learning something else.

jim

If by "Borland couldn't make a go of it" you mean "Borland has developed
10+ versions of it over the span of 10+ years" then I guess you're right.
I started using Delphi 2.0 in 1997.
I don't mean to run down Delphi (or Borland). I remember coding some pretty
cool apps with Turbo Pascal myself. I was simply commenting on the fact
that Borland spun off the developer tools section to a new company called
CodeGear. That makes me a little nervous as a developer.
People have been predicting the demise of Delphi for years. The reality
is, it's a niche product that performs admirably for it's intended
purpose. And I think it would be great for someone who wants to create
"standalone" Win32 apps. I would gauge it as "far superior" to VS up until
VS 2003. I agree with the previous poster who recommended Delphi 7. It's
very stable. D8 was a complete nightmare - so much so that I haven't tried
any version since.
I'll look into D7.
Further, you can supposedly port your code to linux fairly easily using
Kylix (Delphi for Linux), though I've never tried it (and neither did
anyone else, from what I can gather).
I called Borland about Kylix a year (maybe 2) ago, and the person that I
spoke to at Borland had never heard of Kylix. I had to show her the website
for it. At that point Kylix had not been upgraded in 3 years.

I really wish that companies that "retire" software (like Kylix and OS2)
would make it open source. It would be a real help to everyone.

Can you imagine what the world would be like if IBM open sourced OS2 instead
of letting it rot on the vine? It was better than Windows back then......

jim
Dec 28 '07 #23

P: n/a
jim wrote:
Thanks!

I've seen Delphi pop up a lot in these conversations, but I was kind of
afraid that it may not be that reliable since Borland couldn't make a go of
it.
Delphi, older versions, was a very very good development system, well
able to stand on its own against Microsofts tools. The main problem was
userbase and the decision to go for .NET which meant Borland would be
stuck in catch-up mode for a foreseeable future.

They lost the battle, however, mostly because they slipped on the
stability criteria and started shipping really buggy software. Couple
that with a low userbase and the future suddenly didn't look too bright.

If Borland had stuck to what it did best, produce a Win32 compiler, they
might've still had a competing product. These days Delphi is more like
roadkill.

(note, this is an opinion from a long-time Delphi and .NET user)

--
Lasse Vgsther Karlsen
mailto:la***@vkarlsen.no
http://presentationmode.blogspot.com/
Dec 28 '07 #24

P: n/a
Hi jim,

In your case Delphi would me my choice, too.
At least when your requirements are an OS that doesn't have .net installed
by default (XP).

--
Miha Markic [MVP C#, INETA Country Leader for Slovenia]
RightHand .NET consulting & development www.rthand.com
Blog: http://cs.rthand.com/blogs/blog_with_righthand/

"jim" <ji*@home.netwrote in message
news:Oz*******************@bignews7.bellsouth.net. ..
In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and Xenocode,
it was pointed out that there may be better programming languages/IDEs to
use for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps.

My goal is to create desktop applications for use on Windows XP+ OSs that
are distributed as single executables that do not require traditional
install packages to run.

I would like to use a drag and drop UI development tool like the .Net IDE
(or the old VB6) to make development as easy as possible. I am a hobbyist
programmer and would like to put out some useful apps, but I don't want to
have to become an expert at a complex language like C++ to do so reliably.

More than one person responding to the previous thread held the opinion
that .Net was great for corporate environments where all PCs are strictly
regulated, but may not be the best option to develop the type of apps that
I would like to develop for the PC community at large.

So what, in your opinion, would be a good alternative to use to develop
the type of applications that I am trying to develop?

jim
Dec 28 '07 #25

P: n/a
I don't mean to run down Delphi (or Borland). I remember coding some
pretty cool apps with Turbo Pascal myself. I was simply commenting on the
fact that Borland spun off the developer tools section to a new company
called CodeGear. That makes me a little nervous as a developer.
While I did use Delphi in corporate environments, it was really adopted more
by hobbyists and freelancers. Borland decided to try to focus on enterprise
markets (you may recall them changing their name to "Inprise" for a bit) and
began to focus on non-Delphi tools. It was a bit perplexing to those of us
who loved Delphi because some version of Pascal had always been their
flagship product. I have no idea what they are doing now.
I called Borland about Kylix a year (maybe 2) ago, and the person that I
spoke to at Borland had never heard of Kylix. I had to show her the
website for it. At that point Kylix had not been upgraded in 3 years.
Kylix was highly demanded and highly touted. I don't really know why it
failed so miserably. I recall it getting fairly good reviews, and people
chalked it up to "linux users don't want to pay for software".

Dec 28 '07 #26

P: n/a
On 28/12/2007 in message <eQ******************@bignews7.bellsouth.netjim
wrote:
>I've seen Delphi pop up a lot in these conversations, but I was kind of
afraid that it may not be that reliable since Borland couldn't make a go
of it.

I'd hate to begin using a language/IDE and have the company supporting it
go under. It would just waste a lot of time that I could have spent
learning something else.
Codegear is a subsidiary of Borland so they haven't given up yet :-)

I have been following your thoughts with interest. I don't like Delphi and
the IDE is not as good as VS. I've even started playing with C again, I
could never get on with C++.

There is definitely a need for an IDE to develop pure desktop
applications, VS is much too web-centric.

--
Jeff Gaines
Dec 28 '07 #27

P: n/a
Richard Heathfield wrote:
Arne Vajhj said:
>Richard Heathfield wrote:
>>Terry Olsen said:
The only objection to the .NET framework I've heard is from people who
say they don't want some big runtime library installed on their pc's.
Another objection is that it's slow. The first program I moved to .Net
ran around 60 times slower than native - way too slow to be useful.
I think you should spend a bit more time studying .NET !

Let me explain the background. We were developing an analysis product for a
UK bank, we already had working code, and we were asked to try our code
out under .Net - which we did. It ran sixty times slower. Our jaws
dropped, we laughed, and we didn't bother with .Net from then on. Ever.

If you're supposed to be hauling eight thousand tons of freight from London
to Newcastle, and the boss suggests you try using a bicycle instead of
your existing freight train, well, you might give it a go (because it's
the boss asking), but when it doesn't work it would be very silly to blame
yourself for not studying the bicycle enough. You just go back to your
freight train.
Hauling cargo is usually not done the fastest way, just to make a point
here. The cost of doing so far outweighs the actual benefits. There is
typically a sweet spot where you calculate the cost of fuel, increased
wear and tear, and thus maintenance, against the reduced cost of labor,
and time-to-market. I've seen examples of around 75% of the best speed.
Bicycle? no... Trucks? perhaps...

My point? The task of picking the "best tool for the job" should never
use only one measurement to determine the "bestness".

Now, I'm not saying that you could justify switching to a system that
ran your workload at 1/60th of the current speed, but there could be
other trade-offs that could lead you to accept some speed degradation to
get other benefits, perhaps by rewriting the engine using a more
..NET-based approach. Since you don't describe the workload, I'll assume
the best .NET-based approach for this workload ran at 1/60th of the
speed of your current solution. In this case, .NET is entirely the wrong
tool for this particular job.

In your case it might not be possible to get pure .NET managed code to
do what you wanted with the speed you required, but its all about
picking the best tool for the job. Perhaps building the GUI would be
better with .NET and C++ would be better for your analysis engine.

All I can say is that .NET apps does not by a long shot run generally at
1/60th of the speed of a non-.NET app. I've seen faster ones, and I've
seen slower ones. To be fair, many of the slower ones were *really* slow
compared to the non-.NET implementation, but in that case the wrong tool
was being used.

It all depends.

In the original posters case, there are loads of questions that would
have to be asked before a reliable answer could be given to the question
of what is the best tool. Here's just a few of them:

- what is the program supposed to do?
- what kind of programming languages/systems do you know already?
- why the criteria of single-exe, no installer?
- what is the target userbase? (linked to what the program is supposed
to do)

--
Lasse Vgsther Karlsen
mailto:la***@vkarlsen.no
http://presentationmode.blogspot.com/
Dec 28 '07 #28

P: n/a
Scott Roberts wrote:
If by "Borland couldn't make a go of it" you mean "Borland has developed
10+ versions of it over the span of 10+ years" then I guess you're
right. I started using Delphi 2.0 in 1997.

People have been predicting the demise of Delphi for years. The reality
is, it's a niche product that performs admirably for it's intended
purpose. And I think it would be great for someone who wants to create
"standalone" Win32 apps. I would gauge it as "far superior" to VS up
until VS 2003. I agree with the previous poster who recommended Delphi
7. It's very stable. D8 was a complete nightmare - so much so that I
haven't tried any version since.
Not to bring this entire discussion too far off-topic, but Borland was
good at making their niche products, but the latest versions have all
shipped (and been patched to) horribly buggy beasts.

Delphi had its time in the spotlight and could've pulled off a standing
ovation dance act, but it stumbled along the way. I wouldn't inflict
Delphi on my worst enemy these days.

--
Lasse Vgsther Karlsen
mailto:la***@vkarlsen.no
http://presentationmode.blogspot.com/
Dec 28 '07 #29

P: n/a
jim
Thanks Miha!
"Miha Markic" <miha at rthand comwrote in message
news:OF**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
Hi jim,

In your case Delphi would me my choice, too.
At least when your requirements are an OS that doesn't have .net installed
by default (XP).

--
Miha Markic [MVP C#, INETA Country Leader for Slovenia]
RightHand .NET consulting & development www.rthand.com
Blog: http://cs.rthand.com/blogs/blog_with_righthand/

"jim" <ji*@home.netwrote in message
news:Oz*******************@bignews7.bellsouth.net. ..
>In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and
Xenocode, it was pointed out that there may be better programming
languages/IDEs to use for the purpose of creating standalone, single
executable apps.

My goal is to create desktop applications for use on Windows XP+ OSs that
are distributed as single executables that do not require traditional
install packages to run.

I would like to use a drag and drop UI development tool like the .Net IDE
(or the old VB6) to make development as easy as possible. I am a
hobbyist programmer and would like to put out some useful apps, but I
don't want to have to become an expert at a complex language like C++ to
do so reliably.

More than one person responding to the previous thread held the opinion
that .Net was great for corporate environments where all PCs are strictly
regulated, but may not be the best option to develop the type of apps
that I would like to develop for the PC community at large.

So what, in your opinion, would be a good alternative to use to develop
the type of applications that I am trying to develop?

jim

Dec 28 '07 #30

P: n/a

"Richard Heathfield" <rj*@see.sig.invalidwrote in message
news:Ob******************************@bt.com...
Arne Vajhj said:
>Richard Heathfield wrote:
>>Terry Olsen said:
The only objection to the .NET framework I've heard is from people who
say they don't want some big runtime library installed on their pc's.

Another objection is that it's slow. The first program I moved to .Net
ran around 60 times slower than native - way too slow to be useful.

I think you should spend a bit more time studying .NET !

Let me explain the background. We were developing an analysis product for
a
UK bank, we already had working code, and we were asked to try our code
out under .Net - which we did. It ran sixty times slower. Our jaws
dropped, we laughed, and we didn't bother with .Net from then on. Ever.
I'm not sure that your inability to write efficient code with .Net is
necessarily and indictment against .Net.
If you're supposed to be hauling eight thousand tons of freight from
London
to Newcastle, and the boss suggests you try using a bicycle instead of
your existing freight train, well, you might give it a go (because it's
the boss asking), but when it doesn't work it would be very silly to blame
yourself for not studying the bicycle enough. You just go back to your
freight train.
I think you may have been asked to use freight train with more dials and
switches, and you couldn't figure out the controls, so you gave up. :)
Same with .Net - we came, we saw, we laughed - and left.
You came, you couldn't figure it out, you left.

..Net is (eventually) compiled into native code, so there is no reason for it
to be slower - other than lack of programmer skill, of course.

Dec 28 '07 #31

P: n/a
jim

"Scott Roberts" <sr******@no.spam.here-webworks-software.comwrote in
message news:OJ**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>
"Richard Heathfield" <rj*@see.sig.invalidwrote in message
news:Ob******************************@bt.com...
>Arne Vajhj said:
>>Richard Heathfield wrote:
Terry Olsen said:
The only objection to the .NET framework I've heard is from people who
say they don't want some big runtime library installed on their pc's.

Another objection is that it's slow. The first program I moved to .Net
ran around 60 times slower than native - way too slow to be useful.

I think you should spend a bit more time studying .NET !

Let me explain the background. We were developing an analysis product for
a
UK bank, we already had working code, and we were asked to try our code
out under .Net - which we did. It ran sixty times slower. Our jaws
dropped, we laughed, and we didn't bother with .Net from then on. Ever.

I'm not sure that your inability to write efficient code with .Net is
necessarily and indictment against .Net.
>If you're supposed to be hauling eight thousand tons of freight from
London
to Newcastle, and the boss suggests you try using a bicycle instead of
your existing freight train, well, you might give it a go (because it's
the boss asking), but when it doesn't work it would be very silly to
blame
yourself for not studying the bicycle enough. You just go back to your
freight train.

I think you may have been asked to use freight train with more dials and
switches, and you couldn't figure out the controls, so you gave up. :)
>Same with .Net - we came, we saw, we laughed - and left.

You came, you couldn't figure it out, you left.

.Net is (eventually) compiled into native code, so there is no reason for
it to be slower - other than lack of programmer skill, of course.
I strongly disagree. Although I am no .Net expert, I am pretty adept at the
simple stuff. And, the simple .Net apps that I wrote had slower UIs and
presented data slower than their desktop counterparts.

The sad thing is that the desktop counterparts weren't even C++ - they were
VB6.

jim
Dec 28 '07 #32

P: n/a
>.Net is (eventually) compiled into native code, so there is no reason for
it to be slower - other than lack of programmer skill, of course.

I strongly disagree. Although I am no .Net expert, I am pretty adept at
the simple stuff. And, the simple .Net apps that I wrote had slower UIs
and presented data slower than their desktop counterparts.

The sad thing is that the desktop counterparts weren't even C++ - they
were VB6.
When you say "simple stuff" it makes me think that you probably used the
built-in, drag & drop, "RAD" features of the IDE. I would contend that those
features are not intended for use in enterprise applications.

Dec 28 '07 #33

P: n/a
Scott Roberts said:

<snip>
I'm not sure that your inability to write efficient code with .Net is
necessarily and indictment against .Net.
That's another way of looking at it, it's true. What you seem to be saying
is that it's really hard to write efficient code with .Net - which is just
another way of indicting it.
>Same with .Net - we came, we saw, we laughed - and left.

You came, you couldn't figure it out, you left.
What's to figure out? .Net was as slow as syrup, when we already had
something as fast as fireworks. So obviously we dropped it. You can say
it's down to a lack of programmer skill if you like, but your claim
translates to ".Net is so difficult that it can't be used efficiently by
two programmers with over 40 years C++ experience between them" - which
doesn't bode well for .Net, does it?

--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Dec 28 '07 #34

P: n/a
"Arne Vajhj" <ar**@vajhoej.dkschrieb:
>read my post above,...;-)

The one whre you for reasons unknown to me start to talk about MFC in
a Win32 API discusssion and use the term "Sh***", which I have no
idea about what means (the word that comes to my mind only has
4 letters not 5) ?
I assume it should refer to the word variant which has an "e" as its last
letter.

--
M S Herfried K. Wagner
M V P <URL:http://dotnet.mvps.org/>
V B <URL:http://dotnet.mvps.org/dotnet/faqs/>

Dec 28 '07 #35

P: n/a
jim

"Scott Roberts" <sr******@no.spam.here-webworks-software.comwrote in
message news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>
>>.Net is (eventually) compiled into native code, so there is no reason
for
it to be slower - other than lack of programmer skill, of course.

I strongly disagree. Although I am no .Net expert, I am pretty adept at
the simple stuff. And, the simple .Net apps that I wrote had slower UIs
and presented data slower than their desktop counterparts.

The sad thing is that the desktop counterparts weren't even C++ - they
were VB6.

When you say "simple stuff" it makes me think that you probably used the
built-in, drag & drop, "RAD" features of the IDE. I would contend that
those features are not intended for use in enterprise applications.
You would be right. But, that's what we used to build the VB6 apps before
..Net - so why the disparity in speed?

And, why would RAD not be a thing needed in enterprise development? In all
of my enterprise development (back a few years) RAD was a big reason for
using VB. It saved us time in development and mocking up new apps.

jim
Dec 28 '07 #36

P: n/a
jim
Herfried!

Nice to see you around!

jim

"Herfried K. Wagner [MVP]" <hi***************@gmx.atwrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
"Arne Vajhj" <ar**@vajhoej.dkschrieb:
>>read my post above,...;-)

The one whre you for reasons unknown to me start to talk about MFC in
a Win32 API discusssion and use the term "Sh***", which I have no
idea about what means (the word that comes to my mind only has
4 letters not 5) ?

I assume it should refer to the word variant which has an "e" as its last
letter.

--
M S Herfried K. Wagner
M V P <URL:http://dotnet.mvps.org/>
V B <URL:http://dotnet.mvps.org/dotnet/faqs/>

Dec 28 '07 #37

P: n/a
On Fri, 28 Dec 2007 08:38:11 -0800, Lasse Vågsæther Karlsen
<la***@vkarlsen.nowrote:
Not to bring this entire discussion too far off-topic [...]
It's already off-topic, due to the fact that "ji*@home.net" does not
appear to be able to restrain himself from excessive, inappropriate
cross-posting. This is the second time in a day that the
m.p.dotnet.languages.csharp newsgroup has been dragged into a lengthy
off-topic thread because of his posting habits.

I can't speak for comp.programming, but for sure the
m.p.dotnet.languages.* groups are not appropriate forums for comparative
discussions of various programming platforms. Those are for
language-specific programming questions, and nominally also general .NET
programming questions. _Maybe_ m.p.dotnet.general is appropriate, but
even there I'm skeptical.

Of course, it doesn't help that there are a number of people willing to
perpetuate the problem. So we get these long drawn-out threads that have
nothing to do with the newsgroup they're in.

It would be very nice if others could show more restraint than the OP has.

Pete
Dec 28 '07 #38

P: n/a

"jim" <ji*@home.netwrote in message
news:uE******************@bignews7.bellsouth.net.. .
>
"Scott Roberts" <sr******@no.spam.here-webworks-software.comwrote in
message news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>>
>>>.Net is (eventually) compiled into native code, so there is no reason
for
it to be slower - other than lack of programmer skill, of course.

I strongly disagree. Although I am no .Net expert, I am pretty adept at
the simple stuff. And, the simple .Net apps that I wrote had slower UIs
and presented data slower than their desktop counterparts.

The sad thing is that the desktop counterparts weren't even C++ - they
were VB6.

When you say "simple stuff" it makes me think that you probably used the
built-in, drag & drop, "RAD" features of the IDE. I would contend that
those features are not intended for use in enterprise applications.

You would be right. But, that's what we used to build the VB6 apps before
.Net - so why the disparity in speed?
I can't answer your question because I've never used the "RAD" (i.e. drag &
drop data-binding) features of any IDE.
And, why would RAD not be a thing needed in enterprise development? In
all of my enterprise development (back a few years) RAD was a big reason
for using VB. It saved us time in development and mocking up new apps.
I said it wasn't suited for enterprise apps. It's fine for prototyping, but
you don't convert a prototype into a production app (by definition).

Also, it would be false for me to say I don't use *any* RAD features. I
obviously drag and drop controls onto forms and position them, set
properties related to appearance, etc. But since disk I/O has always been
the bottleneck for DB apps, I tend to roll my own data-binding so I know
*exactly* what is going on and why.

Dec 28 '07 #39

P: n/a
>>Same with .Net - we came, we saw, we laughed - and left.

You came, you couldn't figure it out, you left.

What's to figure out? .Net was as slow as syrup, when we already had
something as fast as fireworks. So obviously we dropped it. You can say
it's down to a lack of programmer skill if you like, but your claim
translates to ".Net is so difficult that it can't be used efficiently by
two programmers with over 40 years C++ experience between them" - which
doesn't bode well for .Net, does it?
Did you bother to find out why it was so much slower? I'd be interested to
know, just for my own edification.

Dec 28 '07 #40

P: n/a
I wish you weren't a troll.

This is a great conversation to have, as there are a number of good options,
all with their own unique set of pros and cons.

.... but given, as evidenced from the other thread, that you're just
trolling, it doesn't seem worth the time. Ah well.

--
Chris Mullins

"jim" <ji*@home.netwrote in message
news:Oz*******************@bignews7.bellsouth.net. ..
In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and Xenocode,
it was pointed out that there may be better programming languages/IDEs to
use for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps.

My goal is to create desktop applications for use on Windows XP+ OSs that
are distributed as single executables that do not require traditional
install packages to run.

I would like to use a drag and drop UI development tool like the .Net IDE
(or the old VB6) to make development as easy as possible. I am a hobbyist
programmer and would like to put out some useful apps, but I don't want to
have to become an expert at a complex language like C++ to do so reliably.

More than one person responding to the previous thread held the opinion
that .Net was great for corporate environments where all PCs are strictly
regulated, but may not be the best option to develop the type of apps that
I would like to develop for the PC community at large.

So what, in your opinion, would be a good alternative to use to develop
the type of applications that I am trying to develop?

jim

Dec 28 '07 #41

P: n/a
jim
And, I wish you had answer.

Is this what you do....troll around for threads to call people trolls in?

If you have nothing to add to the discussion, then add nothing (i.e. don't
post).

jim

"Chris Mullins [MVP - C#]" <cm******@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>I wish you weren't a troll.

This is a great conversation to have, as there are a number of good
options, all with their own unique set of pros and cons.

... but given, as evidenced from the other thread, that you're just
trolling, it doesn't seem worth the time. Ah well.

--
Chris Mullins

"jim" <ji*@home.netwrote in message
news:Oz*******************@bignews7.bellsouth.net. ..
>In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and
Xenocode, it was pointed out that there may be better programming
languages/IDEs to use for the purpose of creating standalone, single
executable apps.

My goal is to create desktop applications for use on Windows XP+ OSs that
are distributed as single executables that do not require traditional
install packages to run.

I would like to use a drag and drop UI development tool like the .Net IDE
(or the old VB6) to make development as easy as possible. I am a
hobbyist programmer and would like to put out some useful apps, but I
don't want to have to become an expert at a complex language like C++ to
do so reliably.

More than one person responding to the previous thread held the opinion
that .Net was great for corporate environments where all PCs are strictly
regulated, but may not be the best option to develop the type of apps
that I would like to develop for the PC community at large.

So what, in your opinion, would be a good alternative to use to develop
the type of applications that I am trying to develop?

jim


Dec 28 '07 #42

P: n/a
"Scott Roberts" <sr******@no.spam.here-webworks-software.comwrote in
news:#X**************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl:
Further, you can supposedly port your code to linux fairly easily
using Kylix (Delphi for Linux), though I've never tried it (and
neither did anyone else, from what I can gather).
I thought Kylix didn't work too well? And Linux people prefer free
software?

--
sp**********@rogers.com (Do not e-mail)
Dec 28 '07 #43

P: n/a
Scott Roberts wrote:
>
>>>Same with .Net - we came, we saw, we laughed - and left.
[...]
Did you bother to find out why it was so much slower? I'd be interested
to know, just for my own edification.
Also it would be interesting, how the code was ported to .NET ?
Was it simply C++ / C recompiled as IL code ? This would be not a good
idea, except if you have to ship safe code.
I assume the original code was C based and used C string concatenations.
Simply porting such code to .NET without using StringBuilder wouldn't be
a good idea, performance wise.
Strings in .NET are immutable, which is still a reasonable decision
regarding multi threaded programming and safety.

I can write dumb code in C, which is slower than .NET code. Also I can
tune .NET code by simply using extension libraries like the (beta)
Parallel extensions to .NET, which by changing a single line makes the
code to use multiple cores and outperforms the C/C++ one using only a
single core.

As many other posters wrote, use the right tool for a special task and
don't assume that one code optimized for one platform runs and performs
the same way on other platforms.
Andre

Dec 28 '07 #44

P: n/a
Richard Heathfield wrote:
Arne Vajhj said:
>Richard Heathfield wrote:
>>Terry Olsen said:
The only objection to the .NET framework I've heard is from people who
say they don't want some big runtime library installed on their pc's.
Another objection is that it's slow. The first program I moved to .Net
ran around 60 times slower than native - way too slow to be useful.
I think you should spend a bit more time studying .NET !

Let me explain the background. We were developing an analysis product for a
UK bank, we already had working code, and we were asked to try our code
out under .Net - which we did. It ran sixty times slower. Our jaws
dropped, we laughed, and we didn't bother with .Net from then on. Ever.
Same with .Net - we came, we saw, we laughed - and left.
You may benefit from looking again.

A factor x60 is not a typical difference.

I would expect a difference somewhere in the 0-60% range.

Something went wrong in that port.

Note that already having working code may actually be one
of the reasons. Porting design 1:1 from language A to B
can often result in poor design.
>>A third objection is that it's non-portable.
Since the original poster stated:

#My goal is to create desktop applications for use on Windows XP+ OSs

Then that should not be a problem.

Agreed. But I wasn't answering the OP. Rather, I was answering the person
who said "The only objection to the .NET framework I've heard is..." - so
I was just giving him a couple more to chew on.
I agree on that one.

Mono is a very interesting project.

But I would not recommend .NET as a portable solution
based on Mono.
Yeah, I can understand that, although there is something to be said for the
rapid development of cheesy little toys. Sometimes, they turn into Real
Programs that can be a real benefit to lots of users (at which point it
becomes worth writing them more - um - carefully, shall we say?).
Yep - it has happened many times !

Arne
Dec 28 '07 #45

P: n/a
"Scott Roberts" <sr******@no.spam.here-webworks-software.comschrieb:
>I've seen Delphi pop up a lot in these conversations, but I was kind of
afraid that it may not be that reliable since Borland couldn't make a go
of it.

I'd hate to begin using a language/IDE and have the company supporting it
go under. It would just waste a lot of time that I could have spent
learning something else.

jim

If by "Borland couldn't make a go of it" you mean "Borland has developed
10+ versions of it over the span of 10+ years" then I guess you're right.
I started using Delphi 2.0 in 1997.

People have been predicting the demise of Delphi for years.
Well, yes, but on the other hand Classic Visual Basic (Version 1.0 to 6.0)
was a flagship product and it has been "killed" too without providing an
acceptable upgrade path. If preservation of assets is important, make sure
there exists more than one implementation of the programming language and
the libraries used by applications developed using it. In addition, the
programming language should be widely adopted, so you are not alone if one
vendor suddenly decides to stop further development. Sure, there are many
other factors to be taken into account too for choosing the right
programming language.
The reality is, it's a niche product that performs admirably for it's
intended
purpose. And I think it would be great for someone who wants to create
"standalone" Win32 apps.
Delphi is now developed by another company than Borland. I am not sure
about support for older versions of Delphi like Delphi 7. Applications
developed using older versions may not be guaranteed to work properly on
future versions of Windows. That's what will finally kill VB6 too.
Further, you can supposedly port your code to linux fairly easily using
Kylix (Delphi for Linux), though I've never tried it (and neither did
anyone else, from what I can gather).
Is Kylix still supported and developed further?

--
M S Herfried K. Wagner
M V P <URL:http://dotnet.mvps.org/>
V B <URL:http://dotnet.mvps.org/dotnet/faqs/>

Dec 28 '07 #46

P: n/a
jim wrote:
I strongly disagree. Although I am no .Net expert, I am pretty adept at the
simple stuff. And, the simple .Net apps that I wrote had slower UIs and
presented data slower than their desktop counterparts.
Hm. That text does not really make any sense. A win forms .NET app
is a desktop app as well. And comparing a web app with a desktop app
is at least when it comes to speed comparing apples with oranges.

Arne
Dec 28 '07 #47

P: n/a
jim

"Herfried K. Wagner [MVP]" <hi***************@gmx.atwrote in message
news:u2****************@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
"Scott Roberts" <sr******@no.spam.here-webworks-software.comschrieb:
>>I've seen Delphi pop up a lot in these conversations, but I was kind of
afraid that it may not be that reliable since Borland couldn't make a go
of it.

I'd hate to begin using a language/IDE and have the company supporting
it go under. It would just waste a lot of time that I could have spent
learning something else.

jim

If by "Borland couldn't make a go of it" you mean "Borland has developed
10+ versions of it over the span of 10+ years" then I guess you're right.
I started using Delphi 2.0 in 1997.

People have been predicting the demise of Delphi for years.

Well, yes, but on the other hand Classic Visual Basic (Version 1.0 to 6.0)
was a flagship product and it has been "killed" too without providing an
acceptable upgrade path. If preservation of assets is important, make
sure there exists more than one implementation of the programming language
and the libraries used by applications developed using it. In addition,
the programming language should be widely adopted, so you are not alone if
one vendor suddenly decides to stop further development. Sure, there are
many other factors to be taken into account too for choosing the right
programming language.
>The reality is, it's a niche product that performs admirably for it's
intended
purpose. And I think it would be great for someone who wants to create
"standalone" Win32 apps.

Delphi is now developed by another company than Borland. I am not sure
about support for older versions of Delphi like Delphi 7. Applications
developed using older versions may not be guaranteed to work properly on
future versions of Windows. That's what will finally kill VB6 too.
>Further, you can supposedly port your code to linux fairly easily using
Kylix (Delphi for Linux), though I've never tried it (and neither did
anyone else, from what I can gather).

Is Kylix still supported and developed further?
Not by Borland. The last time they posted a download for it was for a
debugger patch for Linux 2.4 kernel on 01/23/2002 (according to their site
at http://info.borland.com/devsupport/kylix/downloads/).

I had called the company (in 2005 I think) and inquired about Kylix. The
girl answering the phone had never heard of it and I had to lead her to her
company's Kylic pages on their site. She tried to find out something, but
was unable to find anyone that knew anything about it then.

CodeGear (the offshoot of Borland that took all of the developers tools)
doesn't mention it on their site, and any attempts to contact the usergroups
(listed on
http://newsgroups.borland.com/cgi-bi...c.kylix.&utag= )
failed to bring back any posts.

It would have been nice if they donated it to open source instead of just
letting it rot.

jim
Dec 28 '07 #48

P: n/a
jim

"Arne Vajhj" <ar**@vajhoej.dkwrote in message
news:47***********************@news.sunsite.dk...
jim wrote:
>I strongly disagree. Although I am no .Net expert, I am pretty adept at
the simple stuff. And, the simple .Net apps that I wrote had slower UIs
and presented data slower than their desktop counterparts.

Hm. That text does not really make any sense. A win forms .NET app
is a desktop app as well. And comparing a web app with a desktop app
is at least when it comes to speed comparing apples with oranges.
The .Net apps I was refering to here were all desktop apps.

The one database access app that I wrote in VB.Net 1.0 as a webform that
queried an Oracle database perfomed even worse.

jim
Dec 28 '07 #49

P: n/a
jim

"jim" <ji*@home.netwrote in message
news:vr*******************@bignews7.bellsouth.net. ..
>
"Herfried K. Wagner [MVP]" <hi***************@gmx.atwrote in message
news:u2****************@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>"Scott Roberts" <sr******@no.spam.here-webworks-software.comschrieb:
>>>I've seen Delphi pop up a lot in these conversations, but I was kind of
afraid that it may not be that reliable since Borland couldn't make a
go of it.

I'd hate to begin using a language/IDE and have the company supporting
it go under. It would just waste a lot of time that I could have spent
learning something else.

jim

If by "Borland couldn't make a go of it" you mean "Borland has developed
10+ versions of it over the span of 10+ years" then I guess you're
right. I started using Delphi 2.0 in 1997.

People have been predicting the demise of Delphi for years.

Well, yes, but on the other hand Classic Visual Basic (Version 1.0 to
6.0) was a flagship product and it has been "killed" too without
providing an acceptable upgrade path. If preservation of assets is
important, make sure there exists more than one implementation of the
programming language and the libraries used by applications developed
using it. In addition, the programming language should be widely
adopted, so you are not alone if one vendor suddenly decides to stop
further development. Sure, there are many other factors to be taken into
account too for choosing the right programming language.
>>The reality is, it's a niche product that performs admirably for it's
intended
purpose. And I think it would be great for someone who wants to create
"standalone" Win32 apps.

Delphi is now developed by another company than Borland. I am not sure
about support for older versions of Delphi like Delphi 7. Applications
developed using older versions may not be guaranteed to work properly on
future versions of Windows. That's what will finally kill VB6 too.
>>Further, you can supposedly port your code to linux fairly easily using
Kylix (Delphi for Linux), though I've never tried it (and neither did
anyone else, from what I can gather).

Is Kylix still supported and developed further?

Not by Borland. The last time they posted a download for it was for a
debugger patch for Linux 2.4 kernel on 01/23/2002 (according to their site
at http://info.borland.com/devsupport/kylix/downloads/).

I had called the company (in 2005 I think) and inquired about Kylix. The
girl answering the phone had never heard of it and I had to lead her to
her company's Kylic pages on their site. She tried to find out something,
but was unable to find anyone that knew anything about it then.

CodeGear (the offshoot of Borland that took all of the developers tools)
doesn't mention it on their site, and any attempts to contact the
usergroups (listed on
http://newsgroups.borland.com/cgi-bi...c.kylix.&utag= )
failed to bring back any posts.

It would have been nice if they donated it to open source instead of just
letting it rot.

jim
Then again, it would have been nice to see OS2 and Visual Basic open
sourced.

jim
Dec 28 '07 #50

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