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Web Service Session Behaviour

P: n/a
Hi

I've been experimenting with managing state using the Session object. I've
created a simple WS with a couple of methods, one which sets a string
value, another that retrieves it.

Each method has the WebMethodAttribute.EnableSession set to true.

When I run the test page the session is maintained. However, using a
console application, in between setting the string value and attempting to
retrieve it using the same instance of the client proxy, the value is lost.

What am I missing?

TIA

Glenn
Jun 16 '07 #1
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11 Replies


P: n/a

"Glenn" <gl**********@yahoo.co.ukwrote in message
news:Oa**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
Hi

I've been experimenting with managing state using the Session object.
I've created a simple WS with a couple of methods, one which sets a
string value, another that retrieves it.

Each method has the WebMethodAttribute.EnableSession set to true.

When I run the test page the session is maintained. However, using a
console application, in between setting the string value and attempting to
retrieve it using the same instance of the client proxy, the value is
lost.

What am I missing?
The fact that it only applies to an ASP.net web browser session I would
think, in your example.

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/lib...sionstate.aspx

I think if you need to keep a variable's state in this case you have the
following options:

You're going to need to read/write an xml serialized object file with the
variable in it to a common place so that the two applications can get or set
the variable.

Or you use a cookie between the two applications.

Or your other option might be that you use SQL Server or a State Server to
keep session state, between the two applications.

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/lib...lesession.aspx

Jun 16 '07 #2

P: n/a
Doh! Of course - the words "browser session" in the first sentence of the
docs should've given it away.

Thanks for the help

Glenn

"Mr. Arnold" <MR. Ar****@Arnold.comwrote in message
news:eq**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>
"Glenn" <gl**********@yahoo.co.ukwrote in message
news:Oa**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>Hi

I've been experimenting with managing state using the Session object.
I've created a simple WS with a couple of methods, one which sets a
string value, another that retrieves it.

Each method has the WebMethodAttribute.EnableSession set to true.

When I run the test page the session is maintained. However, using a
console application, in between setting the string value and attempting
to retrieve it using the same instance of the client proxy, the value is
lost.

What am I missing?

The fact that it only applies to an ASP.net web browser session I would
think, in your example.

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/lib...sionstate.aspx

I think if you need to keep a variable's state in this case you have the
following options:

You're going to need to read/write an xml serialized object file with the
variable in it to a common place so that the two applications can get or
set the variable.

Or you use a cookie between the two applications.

Or your other option might be that you use SQL Server or a State Server to
keep session state, between the two applications.

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/lib...lesession.aspx

Jun 16 '07 #3

P: n/a
"Mr. Arnold" <MR. Ar****@Arnold.comwrote in message
news:eq**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>
"Glenn" <gl**********@yahoo.co.ukwrote in message
news:Oa**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>Hi

I've been experimenting with managing state using the Session object.
I've created a simple WS with a couple of methods, one which sets a
string value, another that retrieves it.

Each method has the WebMethodAttribute.EnableSession set to true.

When I run the test page the session is maintained. However, using a
console application, in between setting the string value and attempting
to retrieve it using the same instance of the client proxy, the value is
lost.

What am I missing?

The fact that it only applies to an ASP.net web browser session I would
think, in your example.

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/lib...sionstate.aspx
This answer is almost right. ASP.NET session state (even for web services)
is kept in HTTP cookies. A web browser, naturally, knows how to store
cookies and send them back on demand. In order to successfully use a service
that maintains Session state, you need to do the same in your client
programs.

You do this simply by setting the CookieContainer property of your proxy
class instance:

using (MyService service = new MyService())
{
service.CookieContainer = new CookieContainer(); // Other overloads
exist
service.SetSessionValue("string");
string returnedValue = service.GetSessionValue();
if (returnedValue != "string")
{
throw new Exception("Uh-oh!");
}
}

Note that this technique can also be used to set other properties of your
interaction with the web service. See the documentation on the
HttpWebClientProtocol class, especially the Proxy, ClientCertificates,
Timeout, UseDefaultCredentials and Credentials properties.
--
John Saunders [MVP]
Jun 16 '07 #4

P: n/a

"John Saunders [MVP]" <john.saunders at trizetto.comwrote in message
news:uC**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
"Mr. Arnold" <MR. Ar****@Arnold.comwrote in message
news:eq**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>>
"Glenn" <gl**********@yahoo.co.ukwrote in message
news:Oa**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>>Hi

I've been experimenting with managing state using the Session object.
I've created a simple WS with a couple of methods, one which sets a
string value, another that retrieves it.

Each method has the WebMethodAttribute.EnableSession set to true.

When I run the test page the session is maintained. However, using a
console application, in between setting the string value and attempting
to retrieve it using the same instance of the client proxy, the value is
lost.

What am I missing?

The fact that it only applies to an ASP.net web browser session I would
think, in your example.

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/lib...sionstate.aspx

This answer is almost right. ASP.NET session state (even for web services)
is kept in HTTP cookies. A web browser, naturally, knows how to store
cookies and send them back on demand. In order to successfully use a
service that maintains Session state, you need to do the same in your
client programs.
Let's get this right now. An in-process setting for an ASP.NET solution
using Session State is being help in memory at the Web server, which is most
likely the case for the OP and his example. It's not being held in cookies.

Cookies can be used to hold state for a ASP.Net browser session, along with
View State, Hidden fields, Control State and Query Strings.

And in the case of the OP he got two choices that are viable, either use
cookies between the Web service and the Console applications or use XML
Serialized objects between the two applications.

Jun 16 '07 #5

P: n/a
"Mr. Arnold" <MR. Ar****@Arnold.comwrote in message
news:OI**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>
"John Saunders [MVP]" <john.saunders at trizetto.comwrote in message
news:uC**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>"Mr. Arnold" <MR. Ar****@Arnold.comwrote in message
news:eq**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>>>
"Glenn" <gl**********@yahoo.co.ukwrote in message
news:Oa**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
Hi

I've been experimenting with managing state using the Session object.
I've created a simple WS with a couple of methods, one which sets a
string value, another that retrieves it.

Each method has the WebMethodAttribute.EnableSession set to true.

When I run the test page the session is maintained. However, using a
console application, in between setting the string value and attempting
to retrieve it using the same instance of the client proxy, the value
is lost.

What am I missing?

The fact that it only applies to an ASP.net web browser session I would
think, in your example.

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/lib...sionstate.aspx

This answer is almost right. ASP.NET session state (even for web
services) is kept in HTTP cookies. A web browser, naturally, knows how to
store cookies and send them back on demand. In order to successfully use
a service that maintains Session state, you need to do the same in your
client programs.

Let's get this right now. An in-process setting for an ASP.NET solution
using Session State is being help in memory at the Web server, which is
most likely the case for the OP and his example. It's not being held in
cookies.
ASP.NET Session state uses a cookie to pass the session id to the client. It
expects to receive that cookie back on subsequent requests so that it
recognizes the request as being part of the same session.
Cookies can be used to hold state for a ASP.Net browser session,
No, cookies are not used to _hold_ session state. A single cookie is used to
hold a session id, which ASP.NET uses as the key to find the particular
Session dictionary it iwill make available to the web service.
--
John Saunders [MVP]
Jun 17 '07 #6

P: n/a

"John Saunders [MVP]" <john.saunders at trizetto.comwrote in message
news:O%***************@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
"Mr. Arnold" <MR. Ar****@Arnold.comwrote in message
news:OI**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>>
"John Saunders [MVP]" <john.saunders at trizetto.comwrote in message
news:uC**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>>"Mr. Arnold" <MR. Ar****@Arnold.comwrote in message
news:eq**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...

"Glenn" <gl**********@yahoo.co.ukwrote in message
news:Oa**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
Hi
>
I've been experimenting with managing state using the Session object.
I've created a simple WS with a couple of methods, one which sets a
string value, another that retrieves it.
>
Each method has the WebMethodAttribute.EnableSession set to true.
>
When I run the test page the session is maintained. However, using a
console application, in between setting the string value and
attempting to retrieve it using the same instance of the client proxy,
the value is lost.
>
What am I missing?

The fact that it only applies to an ASP.net web browser session I would
think, in your example.

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/lib...sionstate.aspx

This answer is almost right. ASP.NET session state (even for web
services) is kept in HTTP cookies. A web browser, naturally, knows how
to store cookies and send them back on demand. In order to successfully
use a service that maintains Session state, you need to do the same in
your client programs.

Let's get this right now. An in-process setting for an ASP.NET solution
using Session State is being help in memory at the Web server, which is
most likely the case for the OP and his example. It's not being held in
cookies.

ASP.NET Session state uses a cookie to pass the session id to the client.
It expects to receive that cookie back on subsequent requests so that it
recognizes the request as being part of the same session.
Then what's a cookieless session in a ASP.NET browser solution about? You
don't need a cookie to hold a Session ID, which the Session ID is placed in
the URL.

I must be missing something here, and the MS Training book for exam 70-528
must be wrong, when the book talks about a cookieless browser session, using
ASP,NET.

Cookieless sessions are also being talked about in the link provided.

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa479314.aspx
>
No, cookies are not used to _hold_ session state. A single cookie is used
to hold a session id, which ASP.NET uses as the key to find the particular
Session dictionary it iwill make available to the web service.
No, I didn't say that a cookie holds Session State, but a cookie can hold
state for a browser session.

I must be missing something here, when once again, MS MCTS Training book
for exam 70-528 talks about ASP.NET State Management, an entire chapter
concerning this.

Now, you and I might be talking two differrnt things. I am addressing what's
happening in a ASP.NET browser session when you said *it's almost right*.

Jun 17 '07 #7

P: n/a
"Mr. Arnold" <MR. Ar****@Arnold.comwrote in message
news:eM*************@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>
"John Saunders [MVP]" <john.saunders at trizetto.comwrote in message
news:O%***************@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>"Mr. Arnold" <MR. Ar****@Arnold.comwrote in message
news:OI**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>>>
"John Saunders [MVP]" <john.saunders at trizetto.comwrote in message
news:uC**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
"Mr. Arnold" <MR. Ar****@Arnold.comwrote in message
news:eq**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>
"Glenn" <gl**********@yahoo.co.ukwrote in message
news:Oa**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl.. .
>Hi
>>
>I've been experimenting with managing state using the Session object.
>I've created a simple WS with a couple of methods, one which sets a
>string value, another that retrieves it.
>>
>Each method has the WebMethodAttribute.EnableSession set to true.
>>
>When I run the test page the session is maintained. However, using a
>console application, in between setting the string value and
>attempting to retrieve it using the same instance of the client
>proxy, the value is lost.
>>
>What am I missing?
>
The fact that it only applies to an ASP.net web browser session I
would think, in your example.
>
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/lib...sionstate.aspx

This answer is almost right. ASP.NET session state (even for web
services) is kept in HTTP cookies. A web browser, naturally, knows how
to store cookies and send them back on demand. In order to successfully
use a service that maintains Session state, you need to do the same in
your client programs.

Let's get this right now. An in-process setting for an ASP.NET solution
using Session State is being help in memory at the Web server, which is
most likely the case for the OP and his example. It's not being held in
cookies.

ASP.NET Session state uses a cookie to pass the session id to the client.
It expects to receive that cookie back on subsequent requests so that it
recognizes the request as being part of the same session.

Then what's a cookieless session in a ASP.NET browser solution about? You
don't need a cookie to hold a Session ID, which the Session ID is placed
in the URL.
I didn't say there was no such thing as a cookieless session. I said that
session state (by default) depends on a cookie.
I must be missing something here, and the MS Training book for exam 70-528
must be wrong, when the book talks about a cookieless browser session,
using ASP,NET.
Does the book say that all session state is cookieless?
Cookieless sessions are also being talked about in the link provided.

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa479314.aspx
>>
No, cookies are not used to _hold_ session state. A single cookie is used
to hold a session id, which ASP.NET uses as the key to find the
particular Session dictionary it iwill make available to the web service.

No, I didn't say that a cookie holds Session State, but a cookie can hold
state for a browser session.

I must be missing something here, when once again, MS MCTS Training book
for exam 70-528 talks about ASP.NET State Management, an entire chapter
concerning this.

Now, you and I might be talking two differrnt things. I am addressing
what's happening in a ASP.NET browser session when you said *it's almost
right*.
The OP was talking about web services.
--
John Saunders [MVP]
Jun 17 '07 #8

P: n/a

"John Saunders [MVP]" <john.saunders at trizetto.comwrote in message
news:OE**************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
"Mr. Arnold" <MR. Ar****@Arnold.comwrote in message
news:eM*************@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>>
"John Saunders [MVP]" <john.saunders at trizetto.comwrote in message
news:O%***************@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>>"Mr. Arnold" <MR. Ar****@Arnold.comwrote in message
news:OI**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...

"John Saunders [MVP]" <john.saunders at trizetto.comwrote in message
news:uC**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
"Mr. Arnold" <MR. Ar****@Arnold.comwrote in message
news:eq**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl.. .
>>
>"Glenn" <gl**********@yahoo.co.ukwrote in message
>news:Oa**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl. ..
>>Hi
>>>
>>I've been experimenting with managing state using the Session
>>object. I've created a simple WS with a couple of methods, one
>>which sets a string value, another that retrieves it.
>>>
>>Each method has the WebMethodAttribute.EnableSession set to true.
>>>
>>When I run the test page the session is maintained. However, using
>>a console application, in between setting the string value and
>>attempting to retrieve it using the same instance of the client
>>proxy, the value is lost.
>>>
>>What am I missing?
>>
>The fact that it only applies to an ASP.net web browser session I
>would think, in your example.
>>
>http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/lib...sionstate.aspx
>
This answer is almost right. ASP.NET session state (even for web
services) is kept in HTTP cookies. A web browser, naturally, knows how
to store cookies and send them back on demand. In order to
successfully use a service that maintains Session state, you need to
do the same in your client programs.

Let's get this right now. An in-process setting for an ASP.NET solution
using Session State is being help in memory at the Web server, which is
most likely the case for the OP and his example. It's not being held in
cookies.

ASP.NET Session state uses a cookie to pass the session id to the
client. It expects to receive that cookie back on subsequent requests so
that it recognizes the request as being part of the same session.

Then what's a cookieless session in a ASP.NET browser solution about? You
don't need a cookie to hold a Session ID, which the Session ID is placed
in the URL.

I didn't say there was no such thing as a cookieless session. I said that
session state (by default) depends on a cookie.
I didn't say that you did say there was no such thing as a cookieless
session, but I did bring up that fact that there can be a cookieless
session, with Session ID state held without the use of a cookie.
>
>I must be missing something here, and the MS Training book for exam
70-528 must be wrong, when the book talks about a cookieless browser
session, using ASP,NET.

Does the book say that all session state is cookieless?
No, it didn't say that, but the fact remains, that there can be a cookieless
session, which I was told/shown that back in 2004 during .Net training 8
hours for 4 weeks by a .Net guru out of India the company flew in to do the
training, which I have had no need to create an ASP.NET solution that was
cookieless to this point.
>
>Cookieless sessions are also being talked about in the link provided.

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa479314.aspx
>>>
No, cookies are not used to _hold_ session state. A single cookie is
used to hold a session id, which ASP.NET uses as the key to find the
particular Session dictionary it iwill make available to the web
service.

No, I didn't say that a cookie holds Session State, but a cookie can hold
state for a browser session.

I must be missing something here, when once again, MS MCTS Training book
for exam 70-528 talks about ASP.NET State Management, an entire chapter
concerning this.

Now, you and I might be talking two differrnt things. I am addressing
what's happening in a ASP.NET browser session when you said *it's almost
right*.

The OP was talking about web services.
No, the OP started out with ASP.Net and why a Session variable was held in
state with the Web service as opposed to why it was not held in state when
using a Console application with the Web service, which you most elegantly
gave a solution. :)

Jun 17 '07 #9

P: n/a
"Mr. Arnold" <MR. Ar****@Arnold.comwrote in message
news:ed**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>
"John Saunders [MVP]" <john.saunders at trizetto.comwrote in message
news:OE**************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
>"Mr. Arnold" <MR. Ar****@Arnold.comwrote in message
news:eM*************@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>>>
"John Saunders [MVP]" <john.saunders at trizetto.comwrote in message
news:O%***************@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
"Mr. Arnold" <MR. Ar****@Arnold.comwrote in message
news:OI**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>
"John Saunders [MVP]" <john.saunders at trizetto.comwrote in message
news:uC**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl.. .
>"Mr. Arnold" <MR. Ar****@Arnold.comwrote in message
>news:eq**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl. ..
>>>
>>"Glenn" <gl**********@yahoo.co.ukwrote in message
>>news:Oa**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl.. .
>>>Hi
>>>>
>>>I've been experimenting with managing state using the Session
>>>object. I've created a simple WS with a couple of methods, one
>>>which sets a string value, another that retrieves it.
>>>>
>>>Each method has the WebMethodAttribute.EnableSession set to true.
>>>>
>>>When I run the test page the session is maintained. However, using
>>>a console application, in between setting the string value and
>>>attempting to retrieve it using the same instance of the client
>>>proxy, the value is lost.
>>>>
>>>What am I missing?
>>>
>>The fact that it only applies to an ASP.net web browser session I
>>would think, in your example.
>>>
>>http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/lib...sionstate.aspx
>>
>This answer is almost right. ASP.NET session state (even for web
>services) is kept in HTTP cookies. A web browser, naturally, knows
>how to store cookies and send them back on demand. In order to
>successfully use a service that maintains Session state, you need to
>do the same in your client programs.
>
Let's get this right now. An in-process setting for an ASP.NET
solution using Session State is being help in memory at the Web
server, which is most likely the case for the OP and his example. It's
not being held in cookies.

ASP.NET Session state uses a cookie to pass the session id to the
client. It expects to receive that cookie back on subsequent requests
so that it recognizes the request as being part of the same session.

Then what's a cookieless session in a ASP.NET browser solution about?
You don't need a cookie to hold a Session ID, which the Session ID is
placed in the URL.

I didn't say there was no such thing as a cookieless session. I said that
session state (by default) depends on a cookie.

I didn't say that you did say there was no such thing as a cookieless
session, but I did bring up that fact that there can be a cookieless
session, with Session ID state held without the use of a cookie.
>>
>>I must be missing something here, and the MS Training book for exam
70-528 must be wrong, when the book talks about a cookieless browser
session, using ASP,NET.

Does the book say that all session state is cookieless?

No, it didn't say that, but the fact remains, that there can be a
cookieless session, which I was told/shown that back in 2004 during .Net
training 8 hours for 4 weeks by a .Net guru out of India the company flew
in to do the training, which I have had no need to create an ASP.NET
solution that was cookieless to this point.
>>
>>Cookieless sessions are also being talked about in the link provided.

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa479314.aspx
No, cookies are not used to _hold_ session state. A single cookie is
used to hold a session id, which ASP.NET uses as the key to find the
particular Session dictionary it iwill make available to the web
service.

No, I didn't say that a cookie holds Session State, but a cookie can
hold state for a browser session.

I must be missing something here, when once again, MS MCTS Training
book for exam 70-528 talks about ASP.NET State Management, an entire
chapter concerning this.

Now, you and I might be talking two differrnt things. I am addressing
what's happening in a ASP.NET browser session when you said *it's almost
right*.

The OP was talking about web services.

No, the OP started out with ASP.Net and why a Session variable was held in
state with the Web service as opposed to why it was not held in state when
using a Console application with the Web service, which you most elegantly
gave a solution. :)
Ok, this has become a discussion over nothing, but just to get back to the
beginning, here's the original post:
------------
Hi

I've been experimenting with managing state using the Session object. I've
created a simple WS with a couple of methods, one which sets a string
value, another that retrieves it.

Each method has the WebMethodAttribute.EnableSession set to true.

When I run the test page the session is maintained. However, using a
console application, in between setting the string value and attempting to
retrieve it using the same instance of the client proxy, the value is lost.

What am I missing?
-----------

When the OP said "the test page", I assumed he meant the test page generated
by ASP.NET when you access a web service through a browser. You are correct
that this is an ASP.NET page. Also, since it is hosted in a browser, if the
web service used cookie-based session, it would be expected to work, as the
browser will accept the cookie containing the session id from the web
service and send it back, allowing ASP.NET to locate the session state for
the web service.

Note that he says nothing about configuring cookieless sessions, so one
might assume that the kind of session state he's using in his web service
uses a cookie to store the session id, as that is the default.

He goes on to say that this does not work when he uses a console
application. One reason this might not happen is if the session state
depends on a cookie, which his proxy class would normally not maintain. I
suggested he configure a CookieContainer for the proxy. I later posted a
Visual Studio 2005 solution that implemented a web service with session
state and a console client with a CookieContainer. The console application
works when the CookieContainer is configured, but not if that line is
commented out.

So, to the extend that my posted .sln is a reflection of the problem the OP
is having, it might be expected to solve that problem. I hope the OP will
try it and let us all know how it went.

Mr. Arnold, if web services can use cookieless session state, perhaps you
would post, showing us how that can be accomplished. I'm not saying that it
cannot be accomplished, but I've never seen it done.
--
John Saunders [MVP]
Jun 17 '07 #10

P: n/a
>
Mr. Arnold, if web services can use cookieless session state, perhaps you
would post, showing us how that can be accomplished. I'm not saying that
it cannot be accomplished, but I've never seen it done.
I have never done it myself. But I have pulled Session state data for
communications between an ASP.NET and Console application using a serialized
XML accessor object.

If I was in a cookieless state and wanted to save Session state information
with something as miniscule as some Session or state variables between a
Console or a .NET Service application, which is really what this thread is
about, using a Web service, I'll be using a serialized accessor object with
read/write of the XML file to a common directory to pull the information
to/from each application.

However, I would say that it's not a stops all and ends all solution.

Jun 17 '07 #11

P: n/a
Thanks to both of you for the lively debate.

I'm actually studying for 70-529, and the book I'm using mentioned
application Session, Application and client-side cookies as ways to manage
application state. If I'd actually read beyond the book I would have
spotted that Session and explicit use of the CookieContainer property would
have worked for my console app.

Now that I now about it I'll consider it for use in future, provided the
scenario is appropriate.

Once again, thanks to both of you.

Glenn
"Mr. Arnold" <MR. Ar****@Arnold.comwrote in message
news:OM**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>
>>
Mr. Arnold, if web services can use cookieless session state, perhaps you
would post, showing us how that can be accomplished. I'm not saying that
it cannot be accomplished, but I've never seen it done.

I have never done it myself. But I have pulled Session state data for
communications between an ASP.NET and Console application using a
serialized XML accessor object.

If I was in a cookieless state and wanted to save Session state
information with something as miniscule as some Session or state variables
between a Console or a .NET Service application, which is really what this
thread is about, using a Web service, I'll be using a serialized accessor
object with read/write of the XML file to a common directory to pull the
information to/from each application.

However, I would say that it's not a stops all and ends all solution.

Jun 18 '07 #12

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