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can I connect two computers using sockets

P: n/a
ngr
I am wanting to develop an application whereas two computers chat back and
forth.

The scenario is that I have a process running on both computers, which pass
information to each other as they go about processing their jobs -

I am aware that one computer has to act as server, and the other as client.
I did oncemanage to get something running with winsock, but now I am using
VB.NET2005 and sockets appear to have taken the place of winsock.

Please can anyone advise or point me to somewhere, so I know how to obtain a
constant connection and then pass information back and forth.

Thanks in advance for any feedback.

Tf

Apr 26 '07 #1
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"ngr" <ng*@tdrd.karoo.co.ukwrote in
news:m7*********************@eclipse.net.uk:
Please can anyone advise or point me to somewhere, so I know how to
obtain a constant connection and then pass information back and forth.
Standard sockets are bi-directional.

Take a look at TCPClient and Socket classes in .NET
Apr 26 '07 #2

P: n/a
I would suggest the System.Runtime.Remoting namespace. There are a number of
good articles on the subject and even a book or two. Start here:
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/web.../aa740645.aspx

"ngr" wrote:
I am wanting to develop an application whereas two computers chat back and
forth.

The scenario is that I have a process running on both computers, which pass
information to each other as they go about processing their jobs -

I am aware that one computer has to act as server, and the other as client.
I did oncemanage to get something running with winsock, but now I am using
VB.NET2005 and sockets appear to have taken the place of winsock.

Please can anyone advise or point me to somewhere, so I know how to obtain a
constant connection and then pass information back and forth.

Thanks in advance for any feedback.

Tf

Apr 26 '07 #3

P: n/a
=?Utf-8?B?Umljaw==?= <Ri**@discussions.microsoft.comwrote in
news:91**********************************@microsof t.com:
I would suggest the System.Runtime.Remoting namespace. There are a
number of good articles on the subject and even a book or two. Start
here: http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/web.../aa740645.aspx

Remoting is pretty much obsoleted by WCF - if the OP is going to build a
new network application, WCF is better route to go.
Apr 26 '07 #4

P: n/a
On Apr 26, 9:16 am, "ngr" <n...@tdrd.karoo.co.ukwrote:
I am wanting to develop an application whereas two computers chat back and
forth.

The scenario is that I have a process running on both computers, which pass
information to each other as they go about processing their jobs -

I am aware that one computer has to act as server, and the other as client.
I did oncemanage to get something running with winsock, but now I am using
VB.NET2005 and sockets appear to have taken the place of winsock.

Please can anyone advise or point me to somewhere, so I know how to obtain a
constant connection and then pass information back and forth.

Thanks in advance for any feedback.

Tf
You want to get whats called a "crossover" cable. It looks like a
regular cat5 ethernet cable in all respects except it's wired a little
differently to go direct from network card to network card. Or you
can get a small cheap 4 port hub and connect both computers to it with
regular ethernet cables. Once you can ping across then you can load
IIS or whatever and do client/server or web or tcp or dcom, etc.
Apr 26 '07 #5

P: n/a
RickH <pa******@windcrestsoftware.comwrote in
news:11**********************@o40g2000prh.googlegr oups.com:
You want to get whats called a "crossover" cable. It looks like a
regular cat5 ethernet cable in all respects except it's wired a little
differently to go direct from network card to network card. Or you
can get a small cheap 4 port hub and connect both computers to it with
regular ethernet cables. Once you can ping across then you can load
IIS or whatever and do client/server or web or tcp or dcom, etc.
I found that the new Intel network cards on laptops in fact have auto-cross
over. The cross over cables maybe a thing of the past soon :-)
Apr 26 '07 #6

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