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Why .NET/C# will last at most 5 years

P: n/a
Back in 2002 there was a huge thread going where .NET's longevity was
questioned and predictions made as to its demise.

http://groups.google.com/group/micro...languages.csha...

Seeing that it has been 5 years (well almost, 3 months left to go but
that's insignificant) and that .NET has pretty much dominated the
scene, I was wondering what the original nay-sayers would like to add
to their prophecies of doom. I am a developer who saw the writing on
the wall years ago and am glad that I added .NET to my resume (it's now

my primary bread-winner vs my others skill-sets like c, java, delphi,
etc...) I'm not a microsoft fan-boy myself but I find it interesting
that people are so moved by their passions that they feel inclined to
make such far-out predictions that normally don't pan out. Given the
original post's points, would anyone else like to salvage the original
prediction by moving the doomsdate up a few more month/years (perhaps
decades?) or do we feel that .NET is here to stay? It would be
interesting to hear what my fellow C/Java/Delphi/.NET developers would
have to say about the current state of programming platforms as well
and whether .NET has become (or will become in version 3.0) a platform
worth developing on.
Cheers!
Anthony

Jan 9 '07 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
I'm not an MS fan particularly either. I have a great deal of experience
with Delphi (all my products are written in it, see www.ajcsoft.com) and
until recently MS had nothing (IMHO) that could touch it.

I have now been using VS 2005 + code rush & C# for quite a while on another
project and I have to say that its the most powerful thing I have ever used.
I can write systems much faster than I can in any other language/framework.

What adds a great deal of power is the reflection and the easy data binding.
This has helped me to develop a powerful set of business objects between my
app and the database.

Its still a worry to create shareware with though because you can so easily
disassemble it.

I see it being around for quite some time to come.

--
Andrew Cutforth - AJC Software - www.ajcsoft.com
The best folder synchronize and directory compare tool available.
AJC Active Backup instantly archives every file you edit giving you
unlimited undo and automatic revision control. Never lose your data again.
Jan 9 '07 #2

P: n/a
Original link was cutoff... here is the full url :

http://groups.google.com/group/micro...786a6f56ed9b41

Anthony Paul wrote:
Back in 2002 there was a huge thread going where .NET's longevity was
questioned and predictions made as to its demise.

http://groups.google.com/group/micro...languages.csha...

Seeing that it has been 5 years (well almost, 3 months left to go but
that's insignificant) and that .NET has pretty much dominated the
scene, I was wondering what the original nay-sayers would like to add
to their prophecies of doom. I am a developer who saw the writing on
the wall years ago and am glad that I added .NET to my resume (it's now

my primary bread-winner vs my others skill-sets like c, java, delphi,
etc...) I'm not a microsoft fan-boy myself but I find it interesting
that people are so moved by their passions that they feel inclined to
make such far-out predictions that normally don't pan out. Given the
original post's points, would anyone else like to salvage the original
prediction by moving the doomsdate up a few more month/years (perhaps
decades?) or do we feel that .NET is here to stay? It would be
interesting to hear what my fellow C/Java/Delphi/.NET developers would
have to say about the current state of programming platforms as well
and whether .NET has become (or will become in version 3.0) a platform
worth developing on.
Cheers!
Anthony
Jan 9 '07 #3

P: n/a
"Anthony Paul" <an**********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11*********************@m30g2000cwm.googlegro ups.com...
Back in 2002 there was a huge thread going where .NET's longevity was
questioned and predictions made as to its demise.

http://groups.google.com/group/micro...languages.csha...

Seeing that it has been 5 years (well almost, 3 months left to go but
that's insignificant) and that .NET has pretty much dominated the
scene, I was wondering what the original nay-sayers would like to add
to their prophecies of doom. I am a developer who saw the writing on
the wall years ago and am glad that I added .NET to my resume (it's now
That's a troll thread. Something like 600+ replies. Most spend their time
talking about nothing at all. It was a waste of time to create the thread
in the first place and would be a waste of time to go back and reconsider it
now. Let's not dredge up any dead trolls, OK?

Java and .Net are both strong and will stay for the foreseeable future.
Both are good bets for college grads to learn.

The original thread seemed to predict the doom of Microsoft in general.
Well, MS is still standing. XBox 360 is pretty cool. Vista rocks.
Handheld devices with Windows Mobile are widely accepted. New capabilities
in the IDE and the framework make writing software more fun than ever. The
new version of Office takes a little getting used to, but it works really
well. Sharepoint is showing up on most every corporate Intranet in the
country. Windows Live has at least as good a search capability as Google
and the Live 3D maps are as cool as they come. It's a pretty good story.
Add to this the fact that MS is a great place to work... the best place on
earth for a developer to work, IMHO. Hard to complain.

--
--- Nick Malik [Microsoft]
MCSD, CFPS, Certified Scrummaster
http://blogs.msdn.com/nickmalik

Disclaimer: Opinions expressed in this forum are my own, and not
representative of my employer.
I do not answer questions on behalf of my employer. I'm just a
programmer helping programmers.
--

Jan 11 '07 #4

P: n/a
That's a troll thread. Something like 600+ replies. Most spend their time
talking about nothing at all. It was a waste of time to create the thread
in the first place and would be a waste of time to go back and reconsider it
now. Let's not dredge up any dead trolls, OK?

Java and .Net are both strong and will stay for the foreseeable future.
Both are good bets for college grads to learn.

The original thread seemed to predict the doom of Microsoft in general.
Well, MS is still standing. XBox 360 is pretty cool. Vista rocks.
Handheld devices with Windows Mobile are widely accepted. New capabilities
in the IDE and the framework make writing software more fun than ever. The
new version of Office takes a little getting used to, but it works really
well. Sharepoint is showing up on most every corporate Intranet in the
country. Windows Live has at least as good a search capability as Google
and the Live 3D maps are as cool as they come. It's a pretty good story.
Add to this the fact that MS is a great place to work... the best place on
earth for a developer to work, IMHO. Hard to complain.

--
--- Nick Malik [Microsoft]
MCSD, CFPS, Certified Scrummaster
http://blogs.msdn.com/nickmalik

Disclaimer: Opinions expressed in this forum are my own, and not
representative of my employer.
I do not answer questions on behalf of my employer. I'm just a
programmer helping programmers.
--
Agreed!

Jan 11 '07 #5

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.