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Mainstream Apps using DotNet

Jim
With .net having been around for a while now, does anyone know what the
uptake of major software houses is in using .net for Windows Application
development? e.g. have the likes of Adobe, MS, Corel, etc actually released
any applications that use the framework?

Jim
Jul 5 '06 #1
  • viewed: 1265
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9 Replies
Jim,,

This is very much asked and answered in this newsgroup, but can you give us
the main intention of this question. Often it leads to long trolling
threads.

Cor

"Jim" <no****@noSpam.comSpamschreef in bericht
news:GF*********************@fe1.news.blueyonder.c o.uk...
With .net having been around for a while now, does anyone know what the
uptake of major software houses is in using .net for Windows Application
development? e.g. have the likes of Adobe, MS, Corel, etc actually
released any applications that use the framework?

Jim

Jul 5 '06 #2
Jim
Cor,

Whilst trying to track down some answers to this question, I've seen the
question asked also, but not really found anything conclusive.

I suppose the underlying intention of the question is to see how well .net
is actually being adopted as "the" Windows Application development
enviroment, or if software houses are keeping with traditional Win32 tools.

I see lots of books and websites etc all devoted to.net, but as far as
mainstream applications go, I'm not aware of any that use .net. I'm trying
to try and work out who is using the framework for WinForms, and to
determine if the trend is for more and more .net applications, or whether
Win32 is still the more dominant Windows Application environment. - Which is
something that will help me to decide if it's worth basing my next
applications on .net or win32.

My thoughts were that if some of the bigger software houses were now using
..net, then the trend would seem to be leaning towards .net. But as yet, I'm
not sure.

Many thanks

Jim

"Cor Ligthert [MVP]" <no************@planet.nlwrote in message
news:OE**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
Jim,,

This is very much asked and answered in this newsgroup, but can you give
us the main intention of this question. Often it leads to long trolling
threads.

Cor

"Jim" <no****@noSpam.comSpamschreef in bericht
news:GF*********************@fe1.news.blueyonder.c o.uk...
>With .net having been around for a while now, does anyone know what the
uptake of major software houses is in using .net for Windows Application
development? e.g. have the likes of Adobe, MS, Corel, etc actually
released any applications that use the framework?

Jim


Jul 5 '06 #3
Jim,

I would than in your situation take more time to examine what is the best
route to base your next generation of programs on WinFX instead of thinking
that Win32 has an edless life.

Just my thought,

Cor

"Jim" <no****@noSpam.comSpamschreef in bericht
news:yF********************@fe1.news.blueyonder.co .uk...
Cor,

Whilst trying to track down some answers to this question, I've seen the
question asked also, but not really found anything conclusive.

I suppose the underlying intention of the question is to see how well .net
is actually being adopted as "the" Windows Application development
enviroment, or if software houses are keeping with traditional Win32
tools.

I see lots of books and websites etc all devoted to.net, but as far as
mainstream applications go, I'm not aware of any that use .net. I'm trying
to try and work out who is using the framework for WinForms, and to
determine if the trend is for more and more .net applications, or whether
Win32 is still the more dominant Windows Application environment. - Which
is something that will help me to decide if it's worth basing my next
applications on .net or win32.

My thoughts were that if some of the bigger software houses were now using
.net, then the trend would seem to be leaning towards .net. But as yet,
I'm not sure.

Many thanks

Jim

"Cor Ligthert [MVP]" <no************@planet.nlwrote in message
news:OE**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>Jim,,

This is very much asked and answered in this newsgroup, but can you give
us the main intention of this question. Often it leads to long trolling
threads.

Cor

"Jim" <no****@noSpam.comSpamschreef in bericht
news:GF*********************@fe1.news.blueyonder. co.uk...
>>With .net having been around for a while now, does anyone know what the
uptake of major software houses is in using .net for Windows Application
development? e.g. have the likes of Adobe, MS, Corel, etc actually
released any applications that use the framework?

Jim



Jul 5 '06 #4
Jim,

whats in a name? DotNet. Kinda implies a web-centric development
environment. We've got live clients on a hosted ERP/CRM/Financial system,
deployed purely as WebServices. All DotNet. Accessible via Rich Clients
(DotNet + anything that consumes WebServices), PDA's (yep - DotNet Compact
Framework), AJAX etc.

Your question was leading down a funny path. Our apps are Windows apps -
they look, feel and work like typical Windows Apps, but all the "logic" and
persistence resides on a WebServer somwehere in the ether.

None of this is really achievable without WebServices and DotNet in general.

Cheers,

Radek

"Jim" <no****@noSpam.comSpamwrote in message
news:yF********************@fe1.news.blueyonder.co .uk...
Cor,

Whilst trying to track down some answers to this question, I've seen the
question asked also, but not really found anything conclusive.

I suppose the underlying intention of the question is to see how well .net
is actually being adopted as "the" Windows Application development
enviroment, or if software houses are keeping with traditional Win32
tools.

I see lots of books and websites etc all devoted to.net, but as far as
mainstream applications go, I'm not aware of any that use .net. I'm trying
to try and work out who is using the framework for WinForms, and to
determine if the trend is for more and more .net applications, or whether
Win32 is still the more dominant Windows Application environment. - Which
is something that will help me to decide if it's worth basing my next
applications on .net or win32.

My thoughts were that if some of the bigger software houses were now using
.net, then the trend would seem to be leaning towards .net. But as yet,
I'm not sure.

Many thanks

Jim

"Cor Ligthert [MVP]" <no************@planet.nlwrote in message
news:OE**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>Jim,,

This is very much asked and answered in this newsgroup, but can you give
us the main intention of this question. Often it leads to long trolling
threads.

Cor

"Jim" <no****@noSpam.comSpamschreef in bericht
news:GF*********************@fe1.news.blueyonder. co.uk...
>>With .net having been around for a while now, does anyone know what the
uptake of major software houses is in using .net for Windows Application
development? e.g. have the likes of Adobe, MS, Corel, etc actually
released any applications that use the framework?

Jim



Jul 6 '06 #5
Jim
Thanks for your note.

Unfortunately the type of applications I develop aren't suited to running
over the internet yet. As the users will most probably not have access. I
appreciate that for web application development, then .net is one way to go,
....and something to consider if I think that there is any chance I can make
my users go that route.

But to clarrify from the original question, I was trying to guage where the
current momentum is with regard to writing software to run locally under
Windows, on a rich client. As with traditional Windows Application software.
e.g. are win32 tools, such as VC++6, Delphi etc still prefered? over .net
for traditional Windows Applications.

Many thanks

Jim

"Radek Cerny" <ra*********@nospam.c1s.com.auwrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
Jim,

whats in a name? DotNet. Kinda implies a web-centric development
environment. We've got live clients on a hosted ERP/CRM/Financial system,
deployed purely as WebServices. All DotNet. Accessible via Rich Clients
(DotNet + anything that consumes WebServices), PDA's (yep - DotNet Compact
Framework), AJAX etc.

Your question was leading down a funny path. Our apps are Windows apps -
they look, feel and work like typical Windows Apps, but all the "logic"
and persistence resides on a WebServer somwehere in the ether.

None of this is really achievable without WebServices and DotNet in
general.

Cheers,

Radek

"Jim" <no****@noSpam.comSpamwrote in message
news:yF********************@fe1.news.blueyonder.co .uk...
>Cor,

Whilst trying to track down some answers to this question, I've seen the
question asked also, but not really found anything conclusive.

I suppose the underlying intention of the question is to see how well
.net is actually being adopted as "the" Windows Application development
enviroment, or if software houses are keeping with traditional Win32
tools.

I see lots of books and websites etc all devoted to.net, but as far as
mainstream applications go, I'm not aware of any that use .net. I'm
trying to try and work out who is using the framework for WinForms, and
to determine if the trend is for more and more .net applications, or
whether Win32 is still the more dominant Windows Application
environment. - Which is something that will help me to decide if it's
worth basing my next applications on .net or win32.

My thoughts were that if some of the bigger software houses were now
using .net, then the trend would seem to be leaning towards .net. But as
yet, I'm not sure.

Many thanks

Jim

"Cor Ligthert [MVP]" <no************@planet.nlwrote in message
news:OE**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>Jim,,

This is very much asked and answered in this newsgroup, but can you give
us the main intention of this question. Often it leads to long trolling
threads.

Cor

"Jim" <no****@noSpam.comSpamschreef in bericht
news:GF*********************@fe1.news.blueyonder .co.uk...
With .net having been around for a while now, does anyone know what the
uptake of major software houses is in using .net for Windows
Application development? e.g. have the likes of Adobe, MS, Corel, etc
actually released any applications that use the framework?

Jim



Jul 6 '06 #6
I came from a 4GL background, have spent some time in other native win32
environments, and I must say that .NET is definitely the way to go. Unless
you have some extreme gdi requirements (I wouldnt write a video renderer in
..Net). Only drawback is that not every PC has the framework installed. MS
decided to pull it from SP2, and this has frustrated me no end.

Good luck.

"Jim" <no****@noSpam.comSpamwrote in message
news:PS*********************@fe1.news.blueyonder.c o.uk...
Thanks for your note.

Unfortunately the type of applications I develop aren't suited to running
over the internet yet. As the users will most probably not have access. I
appreciate that for web application development, then .net is one way to
go, ...and something to consider if I think that there is any chance I can
make my users go that route.

But to clarrify from the original question, I was trying to guage where
the current momentum is with regard to writing software to run locally
under Windows, on a rich client. As with traditional Windows Application
software. e.g. are win32 tools, such as VC++6, Delphi etc still prefered?
over .net for traditional Windows Applications.

Many thanks

Jim

"Radek Cerny" <ra*********@nospam.c1s.com.auwrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
>Jim,

whats in a name? DotNet. Kinda implies a web-centric development
environment. We've got live clients on a hosted ERP/CRM/Financial
system, deployed purely as WebServices. All DotNet. Accessible via Rich
Clients (DotNet + anything that consumes WebServices), PDA's (yep -
DotNet Compact Framework), AJAX etc.

Your question was leading down a funny path. Our apps are Windows apps -
they look, feel and work like typical Windows Apps, but all the "logic"
and persistence resides on a WebServer somwehere in the ether.

None of this is really achievable without WebServices and DotNet in
general.

Cheers,

Radek

"Jim" <no****@noSpam.comSpamwrote in message
news:yF********************@fe1.news.blueyonder.c o.uk...
>>Cor,

Whilst trying to track down some answers to this question, I've seen the
question asked also, but not really found anything conclusive.

I suppose the underlying intention of the question is to see how well
.net is actually being adopted as "the" Windows Application development
enviroment, or if software houses are keeping with traditional Win32
tools.

I see lots of books and websites etc all devoted to.net, but as far as
mainstream applications go, I'm not aware of any that use .net. I'm
trying to try and work out who is using the framework for WinForms, and
to determine if the trend is for more and more .net applications, or
whether Win32 is still the more dominant Windows Application
environment. - Which is something that will help me to decide if it's
worth basing my next applications on .net or win32.

My thoughts were that if some of the bigger software houses were now
using .net, then the trend would seem to be leaning towards .net. But as
yet, I'm not sure.

Many thanks

Jim

"Cor Ligthert [MVP]" <no************@planet.nlwrote in message
news:OE**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
Jim,,

This is very much asked and answered in this newsgroup, but can you
give us the main intention of this question. Often it leads to long
trolling threads.

Cor

"Jim" <no****@noSpam.comSpamschreef in bericht
news:GF*********************@fe1.news.blueyonde r.co.uk...
With .net having been around for a while now, does anyone know what
the uptake of major software houses is in using .net for Windows
Application development? e.g. have the likes of Adobe, MS, Corel, etc
actually released any applications that use the framework?
>
Jim
>




Jul 6 '06 #7
I have been working in a 4GL environment for many years also. It seems to
me that the versatility offered by dot net is far surpassed by anything
offered by the more conventional programming environs.. I just don't see any
problem with going with the dot net route. Sure the dot net apps can be
reverse engineered but so can my win32 apps. Of course there is always the
down side, the "Cost of doing business" but if the benefits outweigh the
costs.. then it becomes a no brainer as far as I'm concerned.

my 2pennys worth...

Robert

"Radek Cerny" <ra*********@nospam.c1s.com.auwrote in message
news:O3**************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
>I came from a 4GL background, have spent some time in other native win32
environments, and I must say that .NET is definitely the way to go. Unless
you have some extreme gdi requirements (I wouldnt write a video renderer in
.Net). Only drawback is that not every PC has the framework installed. MS
decided to pull it from SP2, and this has frustrated me no end.

Good luck.

"Jim" <no****@noSpam.comSpamwrote in message
news:PS*********************@fe1.news.blueyonder.c o.uk...
>Thanks for your note.

Unfortunately the type of applications I develop aren't suited to running
over the internet yet. As the users will most probably not have access. I
appreciate that for web application development, then .net is one way to
go, ...and something to consider if I think that there is any chance I
can make my users go that route.

But to clarrify from the original question, I was trying to guage where
the current momentum is with regard to writing software to run locally
under Windows, on a rich client. As with traditional Windows Application
software. e.g. are win32 tools, such as VC++6, Delphi etc still prefered?
over .net for traditional Windows Applications.

Many thanks

Jim

"Radek Cerny" <ra*********@nospam.c1s.com.auwrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
>>Jim,

whats in a name? DotNet. Kinda implies a web-centric development
environment. We've got live clients on a hosted ERP/CRM/Financial
system, deployed purely as WebServices. All DotNet. Accessible via
Rich Clients (DotNet + anything that consumes WebServices), PDA's (yep -
DotNet Compact Framework), AJAX etc.

Your question was leading down a funny path. Our apps are Windows
apps - they look, feel and work like typical Windows Apps, but all the
"logic" and persistence resides on a WebServer somwehere in the ether.

None of this is really achievable without WebServices and DotNet in
general.

Cheers,

Radek

"Jim" <no****@noSpam.comSpamwrote in message
news:yF********************@fe1.news.blueyonder. co.uk...
Cor,

Whilst trying to track down some answers to this question, I've seen
the question asked also, but not really found anything conclusive.

I suppose the underlying intention of the question is to see how well
.net is actually being adopted as "the" Windows Application development
enviroment, or if software houses are keeping with traditional Win32
tools.

I see lots of books and websites etc all devoted to.net, but as far as
mainstream applications go, I'm not aware of any that use .net. I'm
trying to try and work out who is using the framework for WinForms, and
to determine if the trend is for more and more .net applications, or
whether Win32 is still the more dominant Windows Application
environment. - Which is something that will help me to decide if it's
worth basing my next applications on .net or win32.

My thoughts were that if some of the bigger software houses were now
using .net, then the trend would seem to be leaning towards .net. But
as yet, I'm not sure.

Many thanks

Jim

"Cor Ligthert [MVP]" <no************@planet.nlwrote in message
news:OE**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
Jim,,
>
This is very much asked and answered in this newsgroup, but can you
give us the main intention of this question. Often it leads to long
trolling threads.
>
Cor
>
"Jim" <no****@noSpam.comSpamschreef in bericht
news:GF*********************@fe1.news.blueyond er.co.uk...
>With .net having been around for a while now, does anyone know what
>the uptake of major software houses is in using .net for Windows
>Application development? e.g. have the likes of Adobe, MS, Corel, etc
>actually released any applications that use the framework?
>>
>Jim
>>
>
>




Jul 6 '06 #8
The re-engineering thing is one fear I absolutely do not have - all of my
precious logic is server-side. Only my GUI classes are deployed, and of
course the layout - simply placeholders. Everything else is safely behind a
WebService facade. To develop something similar in any other environment,
including Java, would have been far more difficult, if not impossible.
Looks, works and feels like a rich windows app, but is merely a facade. And
repeating, biggest issue is PC's NOT having the .Net framework installed.

Cheers,

Radek

"Robert Johnson" <jo*******@sbcglobal.netwrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>I have been working in a 4GL environment for many years also. It seems to
me that the versatility offered by dot net is far surpassed by anything
offered by the more conventional programming environs.. I just don't see
any problem with going with the dot net route. Sure the dot net apps can be
reverse engineered but so can my win32 apps. Of course there is always the
down side, the "Cost of doing business" but if the benefits outweigh the
costs.. then it becomes a no brainer as far as I'm concerned.

my 2pennys worth...

Robert

"Radek Cerny" <ra*********@nospam.c1s.com.auwrote in message
news:O3**************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
>>I came from a 4GL background, have spent some time in other native win32
environments, and I must say that .NET is definitely the way to go.
Unless you have some extreme gdi requirements (I wouldnt write a video
renderer in .Net). Only drawback is that not every PC has the framework
installed. MS decided to pull it from SP2, and this has frustrated me no
end.

Good luck.

"Jim" <no****@noSpam.comSpamwrote in message
news:PS*********************@fe1.news.blueyonder. co.uk...
>>Thanks for your note.

Unfortunately the type of applications I develop aren't suited to
running over the internet yet. As the users will most probably not have
access. I appreciate that for web application development, then .net is
one way to go, ...and something to consider if I think that there is any
chance I can make my users go that route.

But to clarrify from the original question, I was trying to guage where
the current momentum is with regard to writing software to run locally
under Windows, on a rich client. As with traditional Windows Application
software. e.g. are win32 tools, such as VC++6, Delphi etc still
prefered? over .net for traditional Windows Applications.

Many thanks

Jim

"Radek Cerny" <ra*********@nospam.c1s.com.auwrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl.. .
Jim,

whats in a name? DotNet. Kinda implies a web-centric development
environment. We've got live clients on a hosted ERP/CRM/Financial
system, deployed purely as WebServices. All DotNet. Accessible via
Rich Clients (DotNet + anything that consumes WebServices), PDA's
(yep - DotNet Compact Framework), AJAX etc.

Your question was leading down a funny path. Our apps are Windows
apps - they look, feel and work like typical Windows Apps, but all the
"logic" and persistence resides on a WebServer somwehere in the ether.

None of this is really achievable without WebServices and DotNet in
general.

Cheers,

Radek

"Jim" <no****@noSpam.comSpamwrote in message
news:yF********************@fe1.news.blueyonder .co.uk...
Cor,
>
Whilst trying to track down some answers to this question, I've seen
the question asked also, but not really found anything conclusive.
>
I suppose the underlying intention of the question is to see how well
.net is actually being adopted as "the" Windows Application
development enviroment, or if software houses are keeping with
traditional Win32 tools.
>
I see lots of books and websites etc all devoted to.net, but as far as
mainstream applications go, I'm not aware of any that use .net. I'm
trying to try and work out who is using the framework for WinForms,
and to determine if the trend is for more and more .net applications,
or whether Win32 is still the more dominant Windows Application
environment. - Which is something that will help me to decide if it's
worth basing my next applications on .net or win32.
>
My thoughts were that if some of the bigger software houses were now
using .net, then the trend would seem to be leaning towards .net. But
as yet, I'm not sure.
>
Many thanks
>
Jim
>
"Cor Ligthert [MVP]" <no************@planet.nlwrote in message
news:OE**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl.. .
>Jim,,
>>
>This is very much asked and answered in this newsgroup, but can you
>give us the main intention of this question. Often it leads to long
>trolling threads.
>>
>Cor
>>
>"Jim" <no****@noSpam.comSpamschreef in bericht
>news:GF*********************@fe1.news.blueyon der.co.uk...
>>With .net having been around for a while now, does anyone know what
>>the uptake of major software houses is in using .net for Windows
>>Application development? e.g. have the likes of Adobe, MS, Corel,
>>etc actually released any applications that use the framework?
>>>
>>Jim
>>>
>>
>>
>
>




Jul 7 '06 #9

I think the answer to your question lies in what types of applications you
are writing. If you have to get down to really low level programming - then
you may want to stick with C++. However if you understand the paradigm of
managed code (i.e. with is nothing new - it's just the concept that you have
another layer running underneath you - which is the .NET Framework. Other
platforms like Java and Progress have run under this scenario for years) then
..NET wins hands down in so many areas that's it's not even funny (imo).

....they (MS) have just upped the game in so many ways in terms of
productivity etc. that you can't go wrong if you choose to adopt this
platform and stick with it.

(just opinions)

--
Franklin M. Gauer III
Applications Development Manager
Integrated Companies, Inc.
"Radek Cerny" wrote:
The re-engineering thing is one fear I absolutely do not have - all of my
precious logic is server-side. Only my GUI classes are deployed, and of
course the layout - simply placeholders. Everything else is safely behind a
WebService facade. To develop something similar in any other environment,
including Java, would have been far more difficult, if not impossible.
Looks, works and feels like a rich windows app, but is merely a facade. And
repeating, biggest issue is PC's NOT having the .Net framework installed.

Cheers,

Radek

"Robert Johnson" <jo*******@sbcglobal.netwrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
I have been working in a 4GL environment for many years also. It seems to
me that the versatility offered by dot net is far surpassed by anything
offered by the more conventional programming environs.. I just don't see
any problem with going with the dot net route. Sure the dot net apps can be
reverse engineered but so can my win32 apps. Of course there is always the
down side, the "Cost of doing business" but if the benefits outweigh the
costs.. then it becomes a no brainer as far as I'm concerned.

my 2pennys worth...

Robert

"Radek Cerny" <ra*********@nospam.c1s.com.auwrote in message
news:O3**************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
>I came from a 4GL background, have spent some time in other native win32
environments, and I must say that .NET is definitely the way to go.
Unless you have some extreme gdi requirements (I wouldnt write a video
renderer in .Net). Only drawback is that not every PC has the framework
installed. MS decided to pull it from SP2, and this has frustrated me no
end.

Good luck.

"Jim" <no****@noSpam.comSpamwrote in message
news:PS*********************@fe1.news.blueyonder.c o.uk...
Thanks for your note.

Unfortunately the type of applications I develop aren't suited to
running over the internet yet. As the users will most probably not have
access. I appreciate that for web application development, then .net is
one way to go, ...and something to consider if I think that there is any
chance I can make my users go that route.

But to clarrify from the original question, I was trying to guage where
the current momentum is with regard to writing software to run locally
under Windows, on a rich client. As with traditional Windows Application
software. e.g. are win32 tools, such as VC++6, Delphi etc still
prefered? over .net for traditional Windows Applications.

Many thanks

Jim

"Radek Cerny" <ra*********@nospam.c1s.com.auwrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
Jim,

whats in a name? DotNet. Kinda implies a web-centric development
environment. We've got live clients on a hosted ERP/CRM/Financial
system, deployed purely as WebServices. All DotNet. Accessible via
Rich Clients (DotNet + anything that consumes WebServices), PDA's
(yep - DotNet Compact Framework), AJAX etc.

Your question was leading down a funny path. Our apps are Windows
apps - they look, feel and work like typical Windows Apps, but all the
"logic" and persistence resides on a WebServer somwehere in the ether.

None of this is really achievable without WebServices and DotNet in
general.

Cheers,

Radek

"Jim" <no****@noSpam.comSpamwrote in message
news:yF********************@fe1.news.blueyonder. co.uk...
Cor,

Whilst trying to track down some answers to this question, I've seen
the question asked also, but not really found anything conclusive.

I suppose the underlying intention of the question is to see how well
.net is actually being adopted as "the" Windows Application
development enviroment, or if software houses are keeping with
traditional Win32 tools.

I see lots of books and websites etc all devoted to.net, but as far as
mainstream applications go, I'm not aware of any that use .net. I'm
trying to try and work out who is using the framework for WinForms,
and to determine if the trend is for more and more .net applications,
or whether Win32 is still the more dominant Windows Application
environment. - Which is something that will help me to decide if it's
worth basing my next applications on .net or win32.

My thoughts were that if some of the bigger software houses were now
using .net, then the trend would seem to be leaning towards .net. But
as yet, I'm not sure.

Many thanks

Jim

"Cor Ligthert [MVP]" <no************@planet.nlwrote in message
news:OE**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
Jim,,
>
This is very much asked and answered in this newsgroup, but can you
give us the main intention of this question. Often it leads to long
trolling threads.
>
Cor
>
"Jim" <no****@noSpam.comSpamschreef in bericht
news:GF*********************@fe1.news.blueyond er.co.uk...
>With .net having been around for a while now, does anyone know what
>the uptake of major software houses is in using .net for Windows
>Application development? e.g. have the likes of Adobe, MS, Corel,
>etc actually released any applications that use the framework?
>>
>Jim
>>
>
>





Jul 7 '06 #10

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