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Beginner's question

Hello,
I have started learning .NET and I have general question: what are
differences in applications of languages C# and VB? when to use each
of these?
Thank you very much
/RAM/
Jun 21 '06 #1
4 1090
R.A.M. schrieb:
Hello,
I have started learning .NET and I have general question: what are
differences in applications of languages C# and VB? when to use each
of these?

The syntax is different, nothing else. IMHO, the only .NET language
that sticks out is C++/CLI because of the local objects and the
deterministic destructors.

Lots of Greetings!
Volker
--
For email replies, please substitute the obvious.
Jun 21 '06 #2
Hi,
I would say use C# if you have no particular reason for choosing differently
(for instance if your team/organization has a VB background using VB.NET may
be sensible - however, even in this case I would recommend that you consider
switching to C#).

C# is the new language (perhaps not so new anymore though...) created and
specifically tailored for the .NET platform.

Tor Bådshaug
tor.badshaug(AT)bekk.no
"R.A.M." <r_********@poczta.onet.pl> wrote in message
news:d8********************************@4ax.com...
Hello,
I have started learning .NET and I have general question: what are
differences in applications of languages C# and VB? when to use each
of these?
Thank you very much
/RAM/

Jun 21 '06 #3
Hello Volker,

I'd say that there are several hiden VB.net specific feature, related to
the CLR and IL
C# and VB.NET are not completly similiar
Hello,
I have started learning .NET and I have general question: what are
differences in applications of languages C# and VB? when to use each
of these?

VH> The syntax is different, nothing else. IMHO, the only .NET language
VH> that sticks out is C++/CLI because of the local objects and the
VH> deterministic destructors.
VH>
VH> Lots of Greetings!
VH> Volker
---
WBR,
Michael Nemtsev :: blog: http://spaces.msn.com/laflour

"At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not
cease to be insipid." (c) Friedrich Nietzsche
Jun 21 '06 #4
Hello Tor,

While C# may be a new kid on the block, it is certainly not the only new
kid. VB.NET is also a new kid. It's been engineered from the ground up
to work with the .NET Framework (DUH!), just as C# has been. This also applies
to J# and IronPython and and and.. you get the picture. There are no technical
capabilities that C# has that VB does not also have, and vice-a-verse-a (however
you spell that).

The only reason to choose one language over the other is what syntax are
you and your team comfortable with. There's really no other technical consideration
to make.

-Boo

Hi,
I would say use C# if you have no particular reason for choosing
differently
(for instance if your team/organization has a VB background using
VB.NET may
be sensible - however, even in this case I would recommend that you
consider
switching to C#).
C# is the new language (perhaps not so new anymore though...) created
and specifically tailored for the .NET platform.

Tor Bådshaug
tor.badshaug(AT)bekk.no
"R.A.M." <r_********@poczta.onet.pl> wrote in message
news:d8********************************@4ax.com...
Hello,
I have started learning .NET and I have general question: what are
differences in applications of languages C# and VB? when to use each
of these?
Thank you very much
/RAM/

Jun 21 '06 #5

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