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about the "#if (_WIN32_WINNT >= 0x0501)" in the system headers....

In my code I would like to use the constant (define in WinGdi.h)
CLEARTYPE_QUALITY
But that doesn't work!!
(it's for CreateFont(...))

A quick look at the header reveal that:
== WinGdi.h fragment ===
#if (_WIN32_WINNT >= 0x0500)
#define CLEARTYPE_QUALITY 5
#endif
===================

Now I wonder, how do I define _WIN32_WINNT ?
- should I just go into Project Properties => Configuration => C/C++ /
Preprocessor => Definition
and put some random value?

- beside how will this work?
generally speaking my product work on Windows 2000 & XP and this constant is
not a bit flag, it's a number (other constant are 1,2,3,4)

Any tips? advice? ideas? suggestion?
May 27 '06 #1
9 8741
Hi Lloyd!
A quick look at the header reveal that:
== WinGdi.h fragment ===
#if (_WIN32_WINNT >= 0x0500)
#define CLEARTYPE_QUALITY 5
#endif
===================

Now I wonder, how do I define _WIN32_WINNT ?
- should I just go into Project Properties => Configuration => C/C++ /
Preprocessor => Definition
and put some random value?
It should not be random...
See: Using the Windows Headers
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en...ws_headers.asp
If you have a current PSDK, you should set "NTDDI_VERSION"
generally speaking my product work on Windows 2000 & XP and this constant is
not a bit flag, it's a number (other constant are 1,2,3,4)


The define
NTDDI_VERSION=NTDDI_WIN2K
in your project settings

Or (for older PSDKs):
_WIN32_WINNT=0x0500
WINVER=0x0500

--
Greetings
Jochen

My blog about Win32 and .NET
http://blog.kalmbachnet.de/
May 27 '06 #2

"Lloyd Dupont" <net.galador@ld> wrote in message
news:eM**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
In my code I would like to use the constant (define in WinGdi.h)
CLEARTYPE_QUALITY
But that doesn't work!!
(it's for CreateFont(...))

A quick look at the header reveal that:
== WinGdi.h fragment ===
#if (_WIN32_WINNT >= 0x0500)
#define CLEARTYPE_QUALITY 5
#endif
===================

Now I wonder, how do I define _WIN32_WINNT ?
- should I just go into Project Properties => Configuration => C/C++ /
Preprocessor => Definition
and put some random value?
surely not a random value.
- beside how will this work?
generally speaking my product work on Windows 2000 & XP and this constant
is not a bit flag, it's a number (other constant are 1,2,3,4)

Any tips? advice? ideas? suggestion?
#define _WIN32_WINNT 0x0501

in stdafx.h will do best.


May 27 '06 #3
Thanks!
May 27 '06 #4
Thanks!
May 27 '06 #5
"Egbert Nierop (MVP for IIS)" wrote:
generally speaking my product work on Windows 2000 & XP and this constant
is not a bit flag, it's a number (other constant are 1,2,3,4)

Any tips? advice? ideas? suggestion?


#define _WIN32_WINNT 0x0501

in stdafx.h will do best.


Keep in mind that if you are defining _WIN32_WINNT to a specific value
because an API requires it, it is because that API requires at least that
version of Windows to run.

Therefore, if your product must work on Windows 2000, and you are using an
API that requires at least Windows XP (which is what setting _WIN32_WINNT to
0x0501 means), then you are going to have a problem later on when you try to
run your product on Windows 2000.

For your particular situation, ClearType wasn't introduced until WinXP.
Depending on what you are doing with ClearType, you may need to write code to
ascertain which version of Windows is running and to take action accordingly.

Sean
May 27 '06 #6
Thanks for addressing the second part of my question!
I though along those lines:
all these constants are just increasing number (1,2,3,4 and 5 for cleartype)
not only it should be available for windows 2000 in a service pack but,
hopefully, the function should gracefuly either of:
-use a known lower number
-use default DRAFT quality instead....
Anyway, any tip on how to write a simple test of the current OS?

thanks!
"Sean M. DonCarlos" <se********@newsgroups.nospam> wrote in message
news:96**********************************@microsof t.com...
"Egbert Nierop (MVP for IIS)" wrote:
> generally speaking my product work on Windows 2000 & XP and this
> constant
> is not a bit flag, it's a number (other constant are 1,2,3,4)
>
> Any tips? advice? ideas? suggestion?


#define _WIN32_WINNT 0x0501

in stdafx.h will do best.


Keep in mind that if you are defining _WIN32_WINNT to a specific value
because an API requires it, it is because that API requires at least that
version of Windows to run.

Therefore, if your product must work on Windows 2000, and you are using an
API that requires at least Windows XP (which is what setting _WIN32_WINNT
to
0x0501 means), then you are going to have a problem later on when you try
to
run your product on Windows 2000.

For your particular situation, ClearType wasn't introduced until WinXP.
Depending on what you are doing with ClearType, you may need to write code
to
ascertain which version of Windows is running and to take action
accordingly.

Sean

May 28 '06 #7
"Lloyd Dupont" <net.galador@ld> wrote in message
news:uI**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
Anyway, any tip on how to write a simple test of the current OS?


The short answer to the question is to say that you call GetVersionEx().

But you have to understand that if you build an application so that it only
runs on 2K or better, and if someone tries to launch that binary on NT4 say
(a platform which should be retired IMO) that your application may not ever
get to the point of calling GetVersionEx().

An application will fail to load if it makes implicit reference to a
function in a DLL which is not present at load time.

Regards,
Will
May 28 '06 #8
"William DePalo [MVP VC++]" <wi***********@mvps.org> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
"Lloyd Dupont" <net.galador@ld> wrote in message
news:uI**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
Anyway, any tip on how to write a simple test of the current OS?
The short answer to the question is to say that you call GetVersionEx().

But you have to understand that if you build an application so that it
only runs on 2K or better, and if someone tries to launch that binary on
NT4 say (a platform which should be retired IMO) that your application may
not ever get to the point of calling GetVersionEx().

An application will fail to load if it makes implicit reference to a
function in a DLL which is not present at load time.


If the DLL is not present, the application fails to load. If the DLL is
present but an older version so the function is missing, the application
loads and only fails if it tries to call that function, correct?

Regards,
Will

May 29 '06 #9
"Ben Voigt" <rb*@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
news:ew**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
If the DLL is not present, the application fails to load. If the DLL is
present but an older version so the function is missing, the application
loads and only fails if it tries to call that function, correct?


No.

At least not if you link the DLL implicitly. If you do that, at runtime the
loader will display a message box which says something like this:

"The procedure entry point XXXX could not be located in dynamic link
library YYYY".

Regards,
Will


May 29 '06 #10

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