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Bye bye JApplet !

P: n/a
Hi All,

I've got some fundamental question:

Since MS has stopped supporting Java Applet development
according to J# documentation and also discarded Virtual
Machine from the browser what technology can be used to
provide high powered client side that doesn't require
installation (as JApplet) and also provides enough
security restrictions (local I/O restriction for example) ?

P.S. Of course I can use Sun's JDK, but it requires JRE
installation that is about 10-12 MB !!!

Thanks a lot !!!

Jul 19 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
You'll want to use .NET WinForms. UI controls created with .NET can be
hosted in Internet Explorer, just like an applet. Of course, your users will
need to have the .NET framework installed.

David
"Oleg Leikin" <lo***@optisign.net> wrote in message
news:04****************************@phx.gbl...
Hi All,

I've got some fundamental question:

Since MS has stopped supporting Java Applet development
according to J# documentation and also discarded Virtual
Machine from the browser what technology can be used to
provide high powered client side that doesn't require
installation (as JApplet) and also provides enough
security restrictions (local I/O restriction for example) ?

P.S. Of course I can use Sun's JDK, but it requires JRE
installation that is about 10-12 MB !!!

Thanks a lot !!!

Jul 19 '05 #2

P: n/a
You'll want to use .NET WinForms. UI controls created with .NET can behosted in Internet Explorer, just like an applet. Of course, your users willneed to have the .NET framework installed.


David

How this can be achieved ? Is there any documentation
about System.Windows.Forms.Form hosting ?
I'm not sure if this's acceptable for me, since .NET
redistributable is a little bit bigger than Sun's JDK :-),
but I'd like to learn this technique anyway.
Any link/pointer/sample will be appreciated !

Oleg
Jul 19 '05 #3

P: n/a
Hi Oleg,

I believe that www.GotDotNet.com has some samples explaining how to do
this. You're right that the .NET redistributable is larger than the JRE, but
with .NET you have the advantage that it will come installed by default with
MSFT's newer operating systems [at least this was the case with Win2003
which is what I'm using here]. A good fraction of the people using W2K or XP
will have already downloaded the framework by now via the Windows Update
feature.

You might take a look at the web logs for the site for which you're
considering using an embedded .NET control or Java applet. The logs will
tell you which users have the framework installed. If 75% of your users
already have the framework, going with .NET an easy choice. In my opinion,
the only real reason to use JRE instead of .NET is if you want your applet
to run on all platforms (Windows, Mac, Linux)...

David
"Oleg Leikin" <lo***@optisign.net> wrote in message
news:07****************************@phx.gbl...
You'll want to use .NET WinForms. UI controls created

with .NET can be
hosted in Internet Explorer, just like an applet. Of

course, your users will
need to have the .NET framework installed.


David

How this can be achieved ? Is there any documentation
about System.Windows.Forms.Form hosting ?
I'm not sure if this's acceptable for me, since .NET
redistributable is a little bit bigger than Sun's JDK :-),
but I'd like to learn this technique anyway.
Any link/pointer/sample will be appreciated !

Oleg

Jul 19 '05 #4

P: n/a
CH
That said both Dell and HP have announced that they will
be shipping Java with their PC's by the end of the year
and most other manufactures are expected to follow (see
http://zdnet.com.com/2100-1104_2-1015723.html). If the
applet already does the job for you why re-write it?
-----Original Message-----
Hi Oleg,

I believe that www.GotDotNet.com has some samples explaining how to dothis. You're right that the .NET redistributable is larger than the JRE, butwith .NET you have the advantage that it will come installed by default withMSFT's newer operating systems [at least this was the case with Win2003which is what I'm using here]. A good fraction of the people using W2K or XPwill have already downloaded the framework by now via the Windows Updatefeature.

You might take a look at the web logs for the site for which you'reconsidering using an embedded .NET control or Java applet. The logs willtell you which users have the framework installed. If 75% of your usersalready have the framework, going with .NET an easy choice. In my opinion,the only real reason to use JRE instead of .NET is if you want your appletto run on all platforms (Windows, Mac, Linux)...

David
"Oleg Leikin" <lo***@optisign.net> wrote in message
news:07****************************@phx.gbl...
> You'll want to use .NET WinForms. UI controls
created with .NET can be
>hosted in Internet Explorer, just like an applet. Of

course, your users will
>need to have the .NET framework installed.
>


David

How this can be achieved ? Is there any documentation
about System.Windows.Forms.Form hosting ?
I'm not sure if this's acceptable for me, since .NET
redistributable is a little bit bigger than Sun's JDK :- ), but I'd like to learn this technique anyway.
Any link/pointer/sample will be appreciated !

Oleg

.

Jul 19 '05 #5

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