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clean slate project! Is .NET the right tool?

P: n/a
Greetings All!

I'm hoping some of you .NET gurus can help me out. I've search google but I
cannot find the answers I'm looking for.

I have a small business client that would like to replace their current
reservation system which is (badly) written in Access97. Their requirements
are:
- subset to be web-enabled at some point in the future
- support 5 - 10 networked users
- email support
- seamless integration of future functionality (i.e. business modules)
- reporting capability
- connect to a RDBMS
- well supported vendor

I have carte blanche control over what tool is used to build this
application (yea!) and the RDBMS. I am leaning towards .NET since they (the
client) are already an MS shop and I would like to learn this technology
(totally selfish I know...). I would be the only developer on the project.

[background]
For the past 10 years, I have written enterprise applications in Access, VB
3/4/5, SQLWindows/32 and Powerbuilder 4/5/6.5/7/8. I am proficient at using
SQL Server 7, Sybase and Oracle databases (tuning SQL, debugging stored
procs/triggers, creating DTS packages, etc.). I have created web sites that
utilize data driven ASP pages.
[/background]

The initial phase of development will incorporate a basic, plain bones
system. However, the client is interested in adding more functionality onto
the system once they are satisfied (confident) with it.

Since cost is an issue for this client, I am trying to decide on which
version (professional vs enterprise[architect vs developer]) and language
(VB vs C#) I should recommend. I've noticed that .NET Enterprise editions
are selling for under $900 on eBay. Are these legal software? Or is there
some "gotcha" involved with them? I would require stored proc debugging
since I'm a die-hard believer in them!

I'm leaning towards SQLServer 7 as the RDBMS since I already own a copy
(from a project that failed to materialize) but I am open to considering
other viewpoints.

Given all of the above, what would you recommend as to the .NET version I
should consider?

Thanks in advance!

Norm
Jul 19 '05 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
Yes.
"ColdCanuck" <cc@cold.ca> wrote in message
news:FKs4b.117167$K44.24762@edtnps84...
Greetings All!

I'm hoping some of you .NET gurus can help me out. I've search google but I cannot find the answers I'm looking for.

I have a small business client that would like to replace their current
reservation system which is (badly) written in Access97. Their requirements are:
- subset to be web-enabled at some point in the future
- support 5 - 10 networked users
- email support
- seamless integration of future functionality (i.e. business modules)
- reporting capability
- connect to a RDBMS
- well supported vendor

I have carte blanche control over what tool is used to build this
application (yea!) and the RDBMS. I am leaning towards .NET since they (the client) are already an MS shop and I would like to learn this technology
(totally selfish I know...). I would be the only developer on the project.

[background]
For the past 10 years, I have written enterprise applications in Access, VB 3/4/5, SQLWindows/32 and Powerbuilder 4/5/6.5/7/8. I am proficient at using SQL Server 7, Sybase and Oracle databases (tuning SQL, debugging stored
procs/triggers, creating DTS packages, etc.). I have created web sites that utilize data driven ASP pages.
[/background]

The initial phase of development will incorporate a basic, plain bones
system. However, the client is interested in adding more functionality onto the system once they are satisfied (confident) with it.

Since cost is an issue for this client, I am trying to decide on which
version (professional vs enterprise[architect vs developer]) and language
(VB vs C#) I should recommend. I've noticed that .NET Enterprise editions
are selling for under $900 on eBay. Are these legal software? Or is there
some "gotcha" involved with them? I would require stored proc debugging
since I'm a die-hard believer in them!

I'm leaning towards SQLServer 7 as the RDBMS since I already own a copy
(from a project that failed to materialize) but I am open to considering
other viewpoints.

Given all of the above, what would you recommend as to the .NET version I
should consider?

Thanks in advance!

Norm

Jul 19 '05 #2

P: n/a
Hi cc

In my opinion, the Enterprise version is not worth the extra. The UML tool
is underpowered, and I gave up with the database designer after a few days.

I would recommend the Pro version, and spend the balance on a good database
design tool. I like Power Designer, but I believe there are others just as
good (Erwin in particular).

I might have ruffled a few feathers here - Are there people using the Visio
tools in earnest that are satisfied with them? I'd love to hear their views.

regards

Ron

"ColdCanuck" <cc@cold.ca> wrote in message
news:FKs4b.117167$K44.24762@edtnps84...
Greetings All!

I'm hoping some of you .NET gurus can help me out. I've search google but I cannot find the answers I'm looking for.

I have a small business client that would like to replace their current
reservation system which is (badly) written in Access97. Their requirements are:
- subset to be web-enabled at some point in the future
- support 5 - 10 networked users
- email support
- seamless integration of future functionality (i.e. business modules)
- reporting capability
- connect to a RDBMS
- well supported vendor

I have carte blanche control over what tool is used to build this
application (yea!) and the RDBMS. I am leaning towards .NET since they (the client) are already an MS shop and I would like to learn this technology
(totally selfish I know...). I would be the only developer on the project.

[background]
For the past 10 years, I have written enterprise applications in Access, VB 3/4/5, SQLWindows/32 and Powerbuilder 4/5/6.5/7/8. I am proficient at using SQL Server 7, Sybase and Oracle databases (tuning SQL, debugging stored
procs/triggers, creating DTS packages, etc.). I have created web sites that utilize data driven ASP pages.
[/background]

The initial phase of development will incorporate a basic, plain bones
system. However, the client is interested in adding more functionality onto the system once they are satisfied (confident) with it.

Since cost is an issue for this client, I am trying to decide on which
version (professional vs enterprise[architect vs developer]) and language
(VB vs C#) I should recommend. I've noticed that .NET Enterprise editions
are selling for under $900 on eBay. Are these legal software? Or is there
some "gotcha" involved with them? I would require stored proc debugging
since I'm a die-hard believer in them!

I'm leaning towards SQLServer 7 as the RDBMS since I already own a copy
(from a project that failed to materialize) but I am open to considering
other viewpoints.

Given all of the above, what would you recommend as to the .NET version I
should consider?

Thanks in advance!

Norm

Jul 19 '05 #3

P: n/a
Hi Ron

I agree about the Pro version. I don't feel the need to pay that much extra
for the Enterprise version.

I have used Visio and hated it. There's plenty of freedom to do things
anyway you wish, which to some is a benefit. I prefer things to constrain me
to do things the right (standard, if you like) way, or at least to have the
option to turn it on or off, e.g. Option Strict is a good example. Some
people like it and some don't, but what we do have is the choice. Visio also
seems a little flaky in places, when moving symbols, snapping and resizing.
It almost doesn't feel like a Microsoft product. Draw97, though ... now that
was a drawing tool. I have frigged my Office 2000 so that I can still use
it. The way you get little blue boxes in the resize handles when you bring a
snappable line over them. Lovely! [Sorry, I'm going off on one]

I have also used Rational Rose quite a lot. Basically, I like it. But it is
so buggy that this can get in the way of what is, deep down, a good tool.
The printing and layout certainly leave something to be desired, but I don't
know of much other real competition. I would love to hear if there is. I
also think they have missed a trick in the use case specification bit. The
fact that it is free format seems to me to be too loose. Use case specs
should follow a Actor / System / Actor / System ... 'ping-pong' flow, so I
would like the tool to lead me through this style, checking that I keep the
exchange going. Anyway, perhaps that's just me.

Charles
"Ron McNulty" <rm******@xtra.co.nz> wrote in message
news:%2***************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
Hi cc

In my opinion, the Enterprise version is not worth the extra. The UML tool
is underpowered, and I gave up with the database designer after a few days.
I would recommend the Pro version, and spend the balance on a good database design tool. I like Power Designer, but I believe there are others just as
good (Erwin in particular).

I might have ruffled a few feathers here - Are there people using the Visio tools in earnest that are satisfied with them? I'd love to hear their views.
regards

Ron

"ColdCanuck" <cc@cold.ca> wrote in message
news:FKs4b.117167$K44.24762@edtnps84...
Greetings All!

I'm hoping some of you .NET gurus can help me out. I've search google but
I
cannot find the answers I'm looking for.

I have a small business client that would like to replace their current
reservation system which is (badly) written in Access97. Their

requirements
are:
- subset to be web-enabled at some point in the future
- support 5 - 10 networked users
- email support
- seamless integration of future functionality (i.e. business

modules) - reporting capability
- connect to a RDBMS
- well supported vendor

I have carte blanche control over what tool is used to build this
application (yea!) and the RDBMS. I am leaning towards .NET since they

(the
client) are already an MS shop and I would like to learn this technology
(totally selfish I know...). I would be the only developer on the project.
[background]
For the past 10 years, I have written enterprise applications in Access,

VB
3/4/5, SQLWindows/32 and Powerbuilder 4/5/6.5/7/8. I am proficient at

using
SQL Server 7, Sybase and Oracle databases (tuning SQL, debugging stored
procs/triggers, creating DTS packages, etc.). I have created web sites

that
utilize data driven ASP pages.
[/background]

The initial phase of development will incorporate a basic, plain bones
system. However, the client is interested in adding more functionality

onto
the system once they are satisfied (confident) with it.

Since cost is an issue for this client, I am trying to decide on which
version (professional vs enterprise[architect vs developer]) and language (VB vs C#) I should recommend. I've noticed that .NET Enterprise editions are selling for under $900 on eBay. Are these legal software? Or is there some "gotcha" involved with them? I would require stored proc debugging
since I'm a die-hard believer in them!

I'm leaning towards SQLServer 7 as the RDBMS since I already own a copy
(from a project that failed to materialize) but I am open to considering
other viewpoints.

Given all of the above, what would you recommend as to the .NET version I should consider?

Thanks in advance!

Norm


Jul 19 '05 #4

P: n/a
Have you much use for the stored procedure debugger?

I am a big user of stores procs so this feature would be critical for me.

"Charles Law" <bl**@thingummy.com> wrote in message
news:ek**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Hi Ron

I agree about the Pro version. I don't feel the need to pay that much extra for the Enterprise version.

I have used Visio and hated it. There's plenty of freedom to do things
anyway you wish, which to some is a benefit. I prefer things to constrain me to do things the right (standard, if you like) way, or at least to have the option to turn it on or off, e.g. Option Strict is a good example. Some
people like it and some don't, but what we do have is the choice. Visio also seems a little flaky in places, when moving symbols, snapping and resizing. It almost doesn't feel like a Microsoft product. Draw97, though ... now that was a drawing tool. I have frigged my Office 2000 so that I can still use
it. The way you get little blue boxes in the resize handles when you bring a snappable line over them. Lovely! [Sorry, I'm going off on one]

I have also used Rational Rose quite a lot. Basically, I like it. But it is so buggy that this can get in the way of what is, deep down, a good tool.
The printing and layout certainly leave something to be desired, but I don't know of much other real competition. I would love to hear if there is. I
also think they have missed a trick in the use case specification bit. The
fact that it is free format seems to me to be too loose. Use case specs
should follow a Actor / System / Actor / System ... 'ping-pong' flow, so I
would like the tool to lead me through this style, checking that I keep the exchange going. Anyway, perhaps that's just me.

Charles
"Ron McNulty" <rm******@xtra.co.nz> wrote in message
news:%2***************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
Hi cc

In my opinion, the Enterprise version is not worth the extra. The UML tool
is underpowered, and I gave up with the database designer after a few days.

I would recommend the Pro version, and spend the balance on a good

database
design tool. I like Power Designer, but I believe there are others just as good (Erwin in particular).

I might have ruffled a few feathers here - Are there people using the

Visio
tools in earnest that are satisfied with them? I'd love to hear their

views.

regards

Ron

"ColdCanuck" <cc@cold.ca> wrote in message
news:FKs4b.117167$K44.24762@edtnps84...
Greetings All!

I'm hoping some of you .NET gurus can help me out. I've search google but
I
cannot find the answers I'm looking for.

I have a small business client that would like to replace their current reservation system which is (badly) written in Access97. Their

requirements
are:
- subset to be web-enabled at some point in the future
- support 5 - 10 networked users
- email support
- seamless integration of future functionality (i.e. business

modules) - reporting capability
- connect to a RDBMS
- well supported vendor

I have carte blanche control over what tool is used to build this
application (yea!) and the RDBMS. I am leaning towards .NET since they

(the
client) are already an MS shop and I would like to learn this technology (totally selfish I know...). I would be the only developer on the project.
[background]
For the past 10 years, I have written enterprise applications in Access, VB
3/4/5, SQLWindows/32 and Powerbuilder 4/5/6.5/7/8. I am proficient at

using
SQL Server 7, Sybase and Oracle databases (tuning SQL, debugging
stored procs/triggers, creating DTS packages, etc.). I have created web sites

that
utilize data driven ASP pages.
[/background]

The initial phase of development will incorporate a basic, plain bones
system. However, the client is interested in adding more functionality

onto
the system once they are satisfied (confident) with it.

Since cost is an issue for this client, I am trying to decide on which
version (professional vs enterprise[architect vs developer]) and

language (VB vs C#) I should recommend. I've noticed that .NET Enterprise editions are selling for under $900 on eBay. Are these legal software? Or is there some "gotcha" involved with them? I would require stored proc debugging since I'm a die-hard believer in them!

I'm leaning towards SQLServer 7 as the RDBMS since I already own a copy (from a project that failed to materialize) but I am open to considering other viewpoints.

Given all of the above, what would you recommend as to the .NET
version I should consider?

Thanks in advance!

Norm



Jul 19 '05 #5

P: n/a
I haven't used it. I don't use stored procedures if I can help it. I know
that sounds a bit odd, but I like all my code in one place. I still have
this idea that a database is for storing data and an application is where
all the jiggery-pokery is done. Not a very modern view, especially the way
databases are progressing. I'm sure I will have to get used to the idea that
they don't do things like they used to ;-)

Charles
"ColdCanuck" <cc@cold.ca> wrote in message
news:qX*********************@news2.telusplanet.net ...
Have you much use for the stored procedure debugger?

I am a big user of stores procs so this feature would be critical for me.

"Charles Law" <bl**@thingummy.com> wrote in message
news:ek**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Hi Ron

I agree about the Pro version. I don't feel the need to pay that much extra
for the Enterprise version.

I have used Visio and hated it. There's plenty of freedom to do things
anyway you wish, which to some is a benefit. I prefer things to constrain me
to do things the right (standard, if you like) way, or at least to have the
option to turn it on or off, e.g. Option Strict is a good example. Some
people like it and some don't, but what we do have is the choice. Visio

also
seems a little flaky in places, when moving symbols, snapping and

resizing.
It almost doesn't feel like a Microsoft product. Draw97, though ... now

that
was a drawing tool. I have frigged my Office 2000 so that I can still use it. The way you get little blue boxes in the resize handles when you bring a
snappable line over them. Lovely! [Sorry, I'm going off on one]

I have also used Rational Rose quite a lot. Basically, I like it. But it is
so buggy that this can get in the way of what is, deep down, a good

tool. The printing and layout certainly leave something to be desired, but I

don't
know of much other real competition. I would love to hear if there is. I
also think they have missed a trick in the use case specification bit. The fact that it is free format seems to me to be too loose. Use case specs
should follow a Actor / System / Actor / System ... 'ping-pong' flow, so I would like the tool to lead me through this style, checking that I keep

the
exchange going. Anyway, perhaps that's just me.

Charles
"Ron McNulty" <rm******@xtra.co.nz> wrote in message
news:%2***************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
Hi cc

In my opinion, the Enterprise version is not worth the extra. The UML tool is underpowered, and I gave up with the database designer after a few

days.

I would recommend the Pro version, and spend the balance on a good

database
design tool. I like Power Designer, but I believe there are others just as
good (Erwin in particular).

I might have ruffled a few feathers here - Are there people using the

Visio
tools in earnest that are satisfied with them? I'd love to hear their

views.

regards

Ron

"ColdCanuck" <cc@cold.ca> wrote in message
news:FKs4b.117167$K44.24762@edtnps84...
> Greetings All!
>
> I'm hoping some of you .NET gurus can help me out. I've search
google but
I
> cannot find the answers I'm looking for.
>
> I have a small business client that would like to replace their

current > reservation system which is (badly) written in Access97. Their
requirements
> are:
> - subset to be web-enabled at some point in the future
> - support 5 - 10 networked users
> - email support
> - seamless integration of future functionality (i.e. business

modules)
> - reporting capability
> - connect to a RDBMS
> - well supported vendor
>
> I have carte blanche control over what tool is used to build this
> application (yea!) and the RDBMS. I am leaning towards .NET since
they (the
> client) are already an MS shop and I would like to learn this

technology > (totally selfish I know...). I would be the only developer on the

project.
>
> [background]
> For the past 10 years, I have written enterprise applications in Access, VB
> 3/4/5, SQLWindows/32 and Powerbuilder 4/5/6.5/7/8. I am proficient at using
> SQL Server 7, Sybase and Oracle databases (tuning SQL, debugging stored > procs/triggers, creating DTS packages, etc.). I have created web sites that
> utilize data driven ASP pages.
> [/background]
>
> The initial phase of development will incorporate a basic, plain bones > system. However, the client is interested in adding more functionality onto
> the system once they are satisfied (confident) with it.
>
> Since cost is an issue for this client, I am trying to decide on which > version (professional vs enterprise[architect vs developer]) and

language
> (VB vs C#) I should recommend. I've noticed that .NET Enterprise

editions
> are selling for under $900 on eBay. Are these legal software? Or is

there
> some "gotcha" involved with them? I would require stored proc debugging > since I'm a die-hard believer in them!
>
> I'm leaning towards SQLServer 7 as the RDBMS since I already own a copy > (from a project that failed to materialize) but I am open to considering > other viewpoints.
>
> Given all of the above, what would you recommend as to the .NET

version
I
> should consider?
>
> Thanks in advance!
>
> Norm
>
>



Jul 19 '05 #6

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.