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estalish a specific career path in programming

P: n/a
I have a degree in C.I.S and know a little bit of different languages
(Java, C++, VB.Net and in web area, a little bit of JavaScript, Perl
and in database, SQL.

I am trying to decide whether I should concentrate in Database area
(Pl/SQL) or .Net languages. I am interested in programming in all
area but I know that I must focus on one area and I want to decide
between Database and .Net.

My goal is to find an area where I can find entry level jobs the
fastest. I learned that with Database, one needs to be at the developer
rank to find a job in database programming. I am assuming that
developer rank means some industrial programming experience which I
lack. So to land a job in that area, would concentrating in .Net
enviornment be wise. In fact, I can also stick with that area instead
of Database.

Can anyone gives me tips on how to proceed in my self-study so that I
can find a job in programming?

Apr 4 '06 #1
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8 Replies


P: n/a
Hi Sandy,

Database and .Net overlap quite a bit, especially with regards to SQL Server
2005, which can host .Net in Stored Procedures. However, the emphasis is
quite a bit different, in that database administration is quite a bit more
specialized and therefore limited.

You can do well at either career path. From my experience, you should pick
one that is the most enjoyable to you. Personally, for example, I would find
database administration boring, but I bore easily, and many people would
find the more general .Net programming job entirely too frustrating and/or
challenging. It really depends on your personality. The most important thing
in terms of success is your personal motivation. So pick what excites you,
what you are enthusiastic about, and the money will take care of itself.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Show me your certification without works,
and I'll show my certification
*by* my works.

"sandy" <ma**********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@v46g2000cwv.googlegr oups.com...
I have a degree in C.I.S and know a little bit of different languages
(Java, C++, VB.Net and in web area, a little bit of JavaScript, Perl
and in database, SQL.

I am trying to decide whether I should concentrate in Database area
(Pl/SQL) or .Net languages. I am interested in programming in all
area but I know that I must focus on one area and I want to decide
between Database and .Net.

My goal is to find an area where I can find entry level jobs the
fastest. I learned that with Database, one needs to be at the developer
rank to find a job in database programming. I am assuming that
developer rank means some industrial programming experience which I
lack. So to land a job in that area, would concentrating in .Net
enviornment be wise. In fact, I can also stick with that area instead
of Database.

Can anyone gives me tips on how to proceed in my self-study so that I
can find a job in programming?

Apr 4 '06 #2

P: n/a

Kevin Spencer wrote:
Hi Sandy,

Database and .Net overlap quite a bit, especially with regards to SQL Server
2005, which can host .Net in Stored Procedures. However, the emphasis is
quite a bit different, in that database administration is quite a bit more
specialized and therefore limited.

You can do well at either career path. From my experience, you should pick
one that is the most enjoyable to you. Personally, for example, I would find
database administration boring,
Sometimes, I think of Database that way too. I am kind of concern
about that.
but I bore easily, and many people would find the more general .Net programming job
entirely too frustrating and/or challenging.
Well, I have yet to learn a lot about .Net Framework. I have taken the
first course of VB.Net - this was after I graduated - and so I do have
some exposure to it. (Plan to conitnue self-study was thrwarted by
family issues). Now I have to decide whether I should proceed with VB
or get into C#. If C# is similar to Java, I would love it.

Any suggestion on good books on .Net framework , VB.Net and C#?
It really depends on your personality. I am originally from Chemistry background. Wanting to get away
completely from being exposed to any level of Chemicals (including
living in chemical industrial area), I got into IT. I was also
diagnosed with a type of Rhinitis (non-allergic) that makes me very
sensitive to smells. I have become more sensitive as I got older.
The most important thing in terms of success is your personal motivation.
I am very motivated but I have not been able to be productive with
self-study in the past 2 years because of doing things for the family
(no living parents but a bunch of older sisterswho never grow up) as if
I am the man of the house.

I literally was expected to babysit my twin sister, the lazy bone, the
irresponsible, the extremely cold-hearted one. I have been doing that
after I moved near the family (while putting up with her jealousy) but
I am learning to cut the ties because I can't do it anymore. But with
that, I won't have a place to live with free rent and so I will need a
job soon. As much as I don't want to bother with Chemistry, I might
have to take an adjunct faculty position this summer. (I did that in
previous summers.) I am hoping that I only get labs, the low level
classes. Chemistry Lecture (for newbie in teaching like me) requires a
lot of preparation though about $13 more per hour. I prefer to use my
time for programming. One good things is that this 2 year college pays
well depedning on the upper and graduate level credits accumulated.
So pick what excites you, what you are enthusiastic about,
Lately I have been thinking of learning C#. From what I have heard,
it's similar to Java. Is that true? If so, that would be a plus for me
since the langauge that I have the most exposure is Java. In a web
application development course, I had used servlet and jsp a little
bit.
and the money will take care of itself.
I hear you. I am sticking with IT though my oldest sister discourages
me since I moved here, telling me about stupid jobs. Her plan is for
me to get mediocre teaching job and live with her and do the crap for
her and my twin.

Any suggestion on good books on .Net framework , VB.Net and C#? Online
Tutorials?

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Show me your certification without works,
and I'll show my certification
*by* my works.

"sandy" <ma**********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@v46g2000cwv.googlegr oups.com...
I have a degree in C.I.S and know a little bit of different languages
(Java, C++, VB.Net and in web area, a little bit of JavaScript, Perl
and in database, SQL.

I am trying to decide whether I should concentrate in Database area
(Pl/SQL) or .Net languages. I am interested in programming in all
area but I know that I must focus on one area and I want to decide
between Database and .Net.

My goal is to find an area where I can find entry level jobs the
fastest. I learned that with Database, one needs to be at the developer
rank to find a job in database programming. I am assuming that
developer rank means some industrial programming experience which I
lack. So to land a job in that area, would concentrating in .Net
enviornment be wise. In fact, I can also stick with that area instead
of Database.

Can anyone gives me tips on how to proceed in my self-study so that I
can find a job in programming?


Apr 4 '06 #3

P: n/a
Hi Sandy,
If C# is similar to Java, I would love it.
Yes, the syntax is very similar.
Any suggestion on good books on .Net framework , VB.Net and C#?
I have a number of books, none of them about the C# language, per se. But
you can download the free Microsoft .Net SDK, which is the size of a whole
collection of books, and which I use on a daily basis, along with Google, of
course! See:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/netframewo...s/default.aspx
Lately I have been thinking of learning C#. From what I have heard,
it's similar to Java. Is that true?
Yes, it's true. :-D
I am sticking with IT though my oldest sister discourages
me since I moved here, telling me about stupid jobs. Her plan is for
me to get mediocre teaching job and live with her and do the crap for
her and my twin.
I've known people like that. My second ex-wife, when I was starting out in
programming, kept telling me to get "a real job." Of course, now she's still
living hand-to-mouth, and I'm doing very well. Follow your dream.
Online Tutorials?


Google is my second-most-used resource (other than the .Net SDK). I have
managed to make quite a few bookmarks, however. Here are some to start with:

http://msdn1.microsoft.com/en-us/default.aspx
http://msdn.microsoft.com/practices/
http://msdn.microsoft.com/vcsharp/downloads/samples/
http://blogs.msdn.com/
http://www.codeproject.com/
http://fredrik.nsquared2.com/default.aspx
http://www.yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/
http://www.windowsforms.net/
http://www.asp.net

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Show me your certification without works,
and I'll show my certification
*by* my works.

Apr 5 '06 #4

P: n/a

Kevin Spencer wrote:
Hi Sandy,
If C# is similar to Java, I would love it.
Yes, the syntax is very similar.


Thanks for the clearification.
Any suggestion on good books on .Net framework , VB.Net and C#?
I have a number of books, none of them about the C# language, per se. But
you can download the free Microsoft .Net SDK, which is the size of a whole
collection of books, and which I use on a daily basis, along with Google, of
course! See:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/netframewo...s/default.aspx


Thanks. And also thnaks for sharing the book marks.

I have a question. Since I have the academic version of Visual
Studio.Net and MSDN Library for it - I got a good price through school
when I took VB.Net, if I install that my cds for MSDN, it would be the
same things as the one form the above link, right? Also, the instructor
gave us an application file for MSDN updates.I haven't installed my
MSDN cds. Should I install by downloading from the above link instead?

Lately I have been thinking of learning C#. From what I have heard,
it's similar to Java. Is that true?
Yes, it's true. :-D


Thanks for reassuring.

Oh, a former classmate of mine gave me some book name on C#. He
obviosuly like them. (I wish he gave me isbn number too.) Here they
are:

1. C# and the .NET platform By Troelsen

2- Programming .NET components by Juval Lowy

3- .NET and COM the complete interoperability guide By Nathan

Follow your dream.


Thanks a lot.

When I was studying CIS, I met a lady from Dupont giving me direct
email contact for jobs but I didn't use the contact because I had my
mind made up to get out of Chemical industry.

The encouragement from you is greatly appreciated (more than you would
realize) especially since my Chemistry degrees are so useful for
getting into teaching. But for me, that would be like teaching because
I don't know what else to do. Beside, if I wanted to get into
teaching, why would I have gone through studying CIS. I am sticking
with my plan to establish an IT career. I know a couple of Chemistry
instructors - one was an adjunct but both have PhD - who tried IT. One
said she even finsihed the degree but she got married and had a baby
and then got away from it. Probably the same with the other one. I
vowed not to end up like them. I understand that in their case, they
had invested a lot doing PhD.

Thanks again for everything:)-

Apr 5 '06 #5

P: n/a
Hi Sandy,
I have a question. Since I have the academic version of Visual
Studio.Net and MSDN Library for it - I got a good price through school
when I took VB.Net, if I install that my cds for MSDN, it would be the
same things as the one form the above link, right? Also, the instructor
gave us an application file for MSDN updates.I haven't installed my
MSDN cds. Should I install by downloading from the above link instead?


I can't tell you whether it is the same as the ones online, but I'm sure it
is just as good. In fact, the MSDN Library is the comprehensive authority,
so you can't do any better than that.

As for which version, I would install whichever was the latest.

Good luck!

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Show me your certification without works,
and I'll show my certification
*by* my works.
Apr 5 '06 #6

P: n/a

Kevin Spencer wrote:
Hi Sandy,
I have a question. Since I have the academic version of Visual
Studio.Net and MSDN Library for it - I got a good price through school
when I took VB.Net, if I install that my cds for MSDN, it would be the
same things as the one form the above link, right? Also, the instructor
gave us an application file for MSDN updates.I haven't installed my
MSDN cds. Should I install by downloading from the above link instead?
I can't tell you whether it is the same as the ones online, but I'm sure it
is just as good. In fact, the MSDN Library is the comprehensive authority,
so you can't do any better than that.

As for which version, I would install whichever was the latest.


Since mine is Visual Studio.Net 2003, should I stick with MSDN for
VS.Net 2003 only? It wouldn't make sense to use MSDN for .Net 2005
express, right?

Good luck!

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Show me your certification without works,
and I'll show my certification
*by* my works.


Apr 5 '06 #7

P: n/a
> Since mine is Visual Studio.Net 2003, should I stick with MSDN for
VS.Net 2003 only? It wouldn't make sense to use MSDN for .Net 2005
express, right?


It wouldn't immediately provide anything useful to you, no.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Show me your certification without works,
and I'll show my certification
*by* my works.
Apr 6 '06 #8

P: n/a

Kevin Spencer wrote:
Since mine is Visual Studio.Net 2003, should I stick with MSDN for
VS.Net 2003 only? It wouldn't make sense to use MSDN for .Net 2005
express, right?
It wouldn't immediately provide anything useful to you, no.


Thanks.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Show me your certification without works,
and I'll show my certification
*by* my works.


Apr 6 '06 #9

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