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Question from novice - what exactly is assembly?

P: n/a
Hi,

I am totaly novice in .NET and I am studying a book about this. There
was mentioned "assembly". I did not understand, how function does it has .
I would like to know the exact run of code (intermediate language and so
on). Is there any page on internet, which makes me clear?

Thanx

Jul 19 '05 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
Rae
assembly language I presume? Assembly language is not
something you learn. . . it is the code that the computer
runs in and it consists of 0's and 1's (Looks something
like 00100011100010101100101110001) 1's are on, and zero's
are off. It consists of 8 bits (binary units) that make up
a byte.

You don't really learn it, and you don't really need to.
All you need to know is that it is the language computers
talk in. With .Net, whatever language you program in, gets
converted to this assembly language so it can speak to any
type of computer. (Cross platform.)

Anyone else, please correct me if I am wrong.
-----Original Message-----
Hi,

I am totaly novice in .NET and I am studying a book about this. Therewas mentioned "assembly". I did not understand, how function does it has .I would like to know the exact run of code (intermediate language and soon). Is there any page on internet, which makes me clear?

Thanx

.


Jul 19 '05 #2

P: n/a
Assembly can mean 2 different thing.

The assembly language is what was refered to in the first response. However, the code below is actually machine code (the 0 and 1s). Machine code is
ultimately what will get run on the machine, regardless of what you actually program in. Assembly language is a slightly more anvanced language, but still very
very low level. You need to specify which register to put your numbers, then you can do ver y simple arithmatic like add. Assembly language (I believe) is
specific to the machine (or at least the chip); for instance I learned a little 8086 assembly in college. MSIL (microsoft intermediate language) is what your code is
compiled into when you build. It is low level like assembly. You can take a look at it using ildasm.exe. At runtime, the MSIL is converted into the machine code
that runs on the machine. Because this happens at run time, it can optimize some things that cannot be done if we were to compile in into machine code at the
beginning.

However, I an assembly has a different meaning in visual studio.net. An assembly is a unit of code; it is usually a dll or exe. I would just think of it as your dll or
exe, although it is possible(but not through the VS IDE, only through the command line tools) to have an assembly that is in multiple dlls. An assembly in the unit
that permission can be set on, and what you can access without adding a reference.

Hope this helps;
-Ed

--
Ed Smith, VBQA Team
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
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assembly language I presume? Assembly language is not
something you learn. . . it is the code that the computer
runs in and it consists of 0's and 1's (Looks something
like 00100011100010101100101110001) 1's are on, and zero's
are off. It consists of 8 bits (binary units) that make up
a byte.

You don't really learn it, and you don't really need to.
All you need to know is that it is the language computers
talk in. With .Net, whatever language you program in, gets
converted to this assembly language so it can speak to any
type of computer. (Cross platform.)

Anyone else, please correct me if I am wrong.
-----Original Message-----
Hi,

I am totaly novice in .NET and I am studying a book about

this. There
was mentioned "assembly". I did not understand, how

function does it has .
I would like to know the exact run of code (intermediate

language and so
on). Is there any page on internet, which makes me clear?

Thanx

.


Jul 19 '05 #3

P: n/a
Rae napsal(a):
assembly language I presume? Assembly language is not
something you learn. . . it is the code that the computer
runs in and it consists of 0's and 1's (Looks something
like 00100011100010101100101110001) 1's are on, and zero's
are off. It consists of 8 bits (binary units) that make up
a byte.

You don't really learn it, and you don't really need to.
All you need to know is that it is the language computers
talk in. With .Net, whatever language you program in, gets
converted to this assembly language so it can speak to any
type of computer. (Cross platform.)

Anyone else, please correct me if I am wrong.
-----Original Message-----
Hi,

I am totaly novice in .NET and I am studying a book about


this. There
was mentioned "assembly". I did not understand, how


function does it has .
I would like to know the exact run of code (intermediate


language and so
on). Is there any page on internet, which makes me clear?

Thanx

.


Thanx Rae

Jul 19 '05 #4

P: n/a
Ed Smith[msft] napsal(a):
Assembly can mean 2 different thing.

The assembly language is what was refered to in the first response. However, the code below is actually machine code (the 0 and 1s). Machine code is
ultimately what will get run on the machine, regardless of what you actually program in. Assembly language is a slightly more anvanced language, but still very
very low level. You need to specify which register to put your numbers, then you can do ver y simple arithmatic like add. Assembly language (I believe) is
specific to the machine (or at least the chip); for instance I learned a little 8086 assembly in college. MSIL (microsoft intermediate language) is what your code is
compiled into when you build. It is low level like assembly. You can take a look at it using ildasm.exe. At runtime, the MSIL is converted into the machine code
that runs on the machine. Because this happens at run time, it can optimize some things that cannot be done if we were to compile in into machine code at the
beginning.

However, I an assembly has a different meaning in visual studio.net. An assembly is a unit of code; it is usually a dll or exe. I would just think of it as your dll or
exe, although it is possible(but not through the VS IDE, only through the command line tools) to have an assembly that is in multiple dlls. An assembly in the unit
that permission can be set on, and what you can access without adding a reference.

Hope this helps;
-Ed

Thanx Ed

Jul 19 '05 #5

P: n/a
Assuming its the assembly in .NEt that u r talking about .. its a very
simple concept as explained by Ed.
Follow this link to the MSDN site and let us know if u still have any
doubts ...

http://www.msdn.microsoft.com/librar...esoverview.asp

regards,
Soni
Jul 19 '05 #6

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