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Client & Server on Same System

P: n/a
rob
I want to create an application that can be used both for a
server-client model as well as a standalong application. The idea is to
write a general server-client application. The standalong then just has
both components on the same system. Now the question is if this is a
good approach or if this is even doable. For instance do web services
have requirements that would prevent them from running on a non-server
OS? Any input?

Rob

Nov 23 '05 #1
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7 Replies


P: n/a

Absouultely not....you can have your webservice on local machine.....

With Best Regards
Naveen K S
"rob" wrote:
I want to create an application that can be used both for a
server-client model as well as a standalong application. The idea is to
write a general server-client application. The standalong then just has
both components on the same system. Now the question is if this is a
good approach or if this is even doable. For instance do web services
have requirements that would prevent them from running on a non-server
OS? Any input?

Rob

Nov 23 '05 #2

P: n/a
rob
Naveen & All,

So that means you do not need IIS for webservices then, assuming the
client that consumes the webservice is on the same machine. Is this
correct? In that case do you need some other technique to call a
webservice?

Rob

Nov 23 '05 #3

P: n/a

Hi Rob,

When you said you want to install webservice on client machine I assumed
that means client machine had IIS.....you need IIS to run webservice but not
to make a "call" i.e. consuming......

Let me put in a way....
Server ----Has IIS ----Offer Web services
Client -----No IIS ---- Consume Web services
Client ----Has IIS ---- Consume web service

HTH

With Best Regards
Naveen K S
"rob" wrote:
Naveen & All,

So that means you do not need IIS for webservices then, assuming the
client that consumes the webservice is on the same machine. Is this
correct? In that case do you need some other technique to call a
webservice?

Rob

Nov 23 '05 #4

P: n/a
rob
In that case I guess I have a serious problem with my approach. As I
said I would like to have two versions of my program. One will work in
a server-client role. The other one as a standalone program. My plan
was to write a server-client app and then the standalone program just
has the server and client on the same machine. Of course if web
services require IIS this won't work on Windows XP Home Ed, etc. Do you
have any suggestions on how to best address this problem?

Best Regards,
Rob

Nov 23 '05 #5

P: n/a

Hi...

Before I suggest some thing I have few questions....
1. Will users would be connected in network?
2.Will client having Windows XP would have network connection?
3. Are you developing intranet application or internet based application?

If your requiremtnts needs that users need to certain functions on
dis-connected mode and can do "certain" business logics after connecting to
network then I would suggest for a Smart Client Application.....

Let me know the scenarios of both users may be I can suggest you better

HTH

With BEst Regards
Naveen K S
"rob" wrote:
In that case I guess I have a serious problem with my approach. As I
said I would like to have two versions of my program. One will work in
a server-client role. The other one as a standalone program. My plan
was to write a server-client app and then the standalone program just
has the server and client on the same machine. Of course if web
services require IIS this won't work on Windows XP Home Ed, etc. Do you
have any suggestions on how to best address this problem?

Best Regards,
Rob

Nov 23 '05 #6

P: n/a
rob
Naveen,

Thanks for your reply. Here are the two scenarios.

There are multiple users all of them working with the same data. In
this case a server-client approach is chosen. The solution might be
deployed on an intranet or internet. The client has some complex
functions so I need a "rich" client.

If there is only one user it makes no sense to require him to have a
server. The user also might not want to host his data on an external
server. Nevertheless, he might (or might not) still connect to a server
for a data feed.

In both scenarios the users should be able to do some (limited) work
even when they are not connected to the server.

For the second scenario I do not want to write a seperate application.
So I was thinking of simply putting the client and server on the same
user machine. There are a few problems with that, though.

1) The user does not have MSSQL. I might just use MSDE for the second
scenario.

2) The user does not have IIS. This is a problem because I wanted to
use web services on the server to supply the client with data.

3) There might be some problems with authentification, authorization,
etc.

Any input on this is highly appreciated.

Regards,
Rob

Nov 23 '05 #7

P: n/a

Hi Rob,

Well....I would suggest you to build a Smart Client Application with SOA
approach.

Have Presentation, Business logics [some] on client.....use MSDE through
data access layer to connect Database on server......have important business
critical business logics or functions which might need other users input
deployed on server as webservices so that client consumes that .....

I hope this helps

With Best Regards
naveen K S
"rob" wrote:
Naveen,

Thanks for your reply. Here are the two scenarios.

There are multiple users all of them working with the same data. In
this case a server-client approach is chosen. The solution might be
deployed on an intranet or internet. The client has some complex
functions so I need a "rich" client.

If there is only one user it makes no sense to require him to have a
server. The user also might not want to host his data on an external
server. Nevertheless, he might (or might not) still connect to a server
for a data feed.

In both scenarios the users should be able to do some (limited) work
even when they are not connected to the server.

For the second scenario I do not want to write a seperate application.
So I was thinking of simply putting the client and server on the same
user machine. There are a few problems with that, though.

1) The user does not have MSSQL. I might just use MSDE for the second
scenario.

2) The user does not have IIS. This is a problem because I wanted to
use web services on the server to supply the client with data.

3) There might be some problems with authentification, authorization,
etc.

Any input on this is highly appreciated.

Regards,
Rob

Nov 23 '05 #8

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