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What is the advantage of WSDL?

P: n/a
What is the advantage of a WSDL web service over an API that will be running
as an XML engine accessible via an HTTP address over a special port?
The client needs to access the API using the HTTP POST methode.

What benefits does a wsdl web service have? If we develope a web service
should it be wsdl enabled or not?
Nov 23 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
MyName wrote:
What benefits does a wsdl web service have? If we develope a web service
should it be wsdl enabled or not?


Hi there

Interoperabilty is the first word that I think of:
Other platforms (J2EE etc.) can read the WSDL, "inspect" the API and
based on that "inspection" make calls to the WebService.

Easy of development is second:
Nearly all IDEs working with WebServices can deal with WSDL, and most
important generate a plain vanilla proxy class for the desired platform
/ programming language (.NET, C#, VB, Java).
The proxy class can take advantage of the IDEs "CodeInsight" or whatever
the technologi is called to show members and methods on a class. And
these methods will be named as in your WSDL
So you get more "developer-friendly" API built around proxy classes,
instead of having to know all request parameter names and possible
(read: valid) values when you do a HTTP Post as you suggested.

Validation:
Futhermore, if you build (and you should in my opinion) your request
messages (methods and parameters) and response messages (return
parameters / structures) around XML schemas, your WebService engine can
validate that the incoming message conforms to this schema.

This was the first three things I could think of.

Regards

Henrik
http://websolver.blogspot.com
Nov 23 '05 #2

P: n/a
MyName wrote:
What benefits does a wsdl web service have? If we develope a web service
should it be wsdl enabled or not?


Hi there

Interoperabilty is the first word that I think of:
Other platforms (J2EE etc.) can read the WSDL, "inspect" the API and
based on that "inspection" make calls to the WebService.

Easy of development is second:
Nearly all IDEs working with WebServices can deal with WSDL, and most
important generate a plain vanilla proxy class for the desired platform
/ programming language (.NET, C#, VB, Java).
The proxy class can take advantage of the IDEs "CodeInsight" or whatever
the technologi is called to show members and methods on a class. And
these methods will be named as in your WSDL
So you get more "developer-friendly" API built around proxy classes,
instead of having to know all request parameter names and possible
(read: valid) values when you do a HTTP Post as you suggested.

Validation:
Futhermore, if you build (and you should in my opinion) your request
messages (methods and parameters) and response messages (return
parameters / structures) around XML schemas, your WebService engine can
validate that the incoming message conforms to this schema.

This was the first three things I could think of.

Regards

Henrik
http://websolver.blogspot.com
Nov 23 '05 #3

P: n/a
Thanks Henrik

Your opinion is valued.

Regards

"Henrik Gøttig" <hg@websolver.dk> wrote in message
news:u3**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
MyName wrote:
What benefits does a wsdl web service have? If we develope a web service
should it be wsdl enabled or not?


Hi there

Interoperabilty is the first word that I think of:
Other platforms (J2EE etc.) can read the WSDL, "inspect" the API and based
on that "inspection" make calls to the WebService.

Easy of development is second:
Nearly all IDEs working with WebServices can deal with WSDL, and most
important generate a plain vanilla proxy class for the desired platform /
programming language (.NET, C#, VB, Java).
The proxy class can take advantage of the IDEs "CodeInsight" or whatever
the technologi is called to show members and methods on a class. And these
methods will be named as in your WSDL
So you get more "developer-friendly" API built around proxy classes,
instead of having to know all request parameter names and possible (read:
valid) values when you do a HTTP Post as you suggested.

Validation:
Futhermore, if you build (and you should in my opinion) your request
messages (methods and parameters) and response messages (return parameters
/ structures) around XML schemas, your WebService engine can validate that
the incoming message conforms to this schema.

This was the first three things I could think of.

Regards

Henrik
http://websolver.blogspot.com

Nov 23 '05 #4

P: n/a
Thanks Henrik

Your opinion is valued.

Regards

"Henrik Gøttig" <hg@websolver.dk> wrote in message
news:u3**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
MyName wrote:
What benefits does a wsdl web service have? If we develope a web service
should it be wsdl enabled or not?


Hi there

Interoperabilty is the first word that I think of:
Other platforms (J2EE etc.) can read the WSDL, "inspect" the API and based
on that "inspection" make calls to the WebService.

Easy of development is second:
Nearly all IDEs working with WebServices can deal with WSDL, and most
important generate a plain vanilla proxy class for the desired platform /
programming language (.NET, C#, VB, Java).
The proxy class can take advantage of the IDEs "CodeInsight" or whatever
the technologi is called to show members and methods on a class. And these
methods will be named as in your WSDL
So you get more "developer-friendly" API built around proxy classes,
instead of having to know all request parameter names and possible (read:
valid) values when you do a HTTP Post as you suggested.

Validation:
Futhermore, if you build (and you should in my opinion) your request
messages (methods and parameters) and response messages (return parameters
/ structures) around XML schemas, your WebService engine can validate that
the incoming message conforms to this schema.

This was the first three things I could think of.

Regards

Henrik
http://websolver.blogspot.com

Nov 23 '05 #5

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