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.net's altenative to java beans

P: n/a
HI
please could anyone give me any links/URL's that i could visit for good
tutorials / examples on what .net uses as an altenative to java beans ?

as far as i can find out it uses "com" and wizards is this true ???

Thanks!!!!
Nov 22 '05 #1
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3 Replies


P: n/a
The closest equivalent is Enterprise Services (also known as COM+ and
Component Services).

Just search "Enterprise services" on google/msdn.

As a start try the following link "Understanding Enterprise Services (COM+)
in .NET"
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...ml/entserv.asp
Yes "under the covers" this technology uses COM+. Don't worry about that. If
you base your communication infrastructure on Enterprise Services now you
should have a smooth upgrade path to the next .NET communication framework
(codename "Indigo" - part of Longhorn).
Nov 22 '05 #2

P: n/a
I would worry alot, COM interp doesn't come cheap, nor does it come with out
complexity.

JavaBeans are just server components right? so you could instead build
remoting objects ( which is server components).

Depending on what services you need, there's probably a native .net way to
do it.

--
Patrik L÷wendahl [C# MVP]
www.cshrp.net - "Elegant code by witty programmers"

'"richlm" <ri*****@h0tmai1.com> wrote in message
news:eR**************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
The closest equivalent is Enterprise Services (also known as COM+ and
Component Services).

Just search "Enterprise services" on google/msdn.

As a start try the following link "Understanding Enterprise Services
(COM+) in .NET"
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...ml/entserv.asp
Yes "under the covers" this technology uses COM+. Don't worry about that.
If you base your communication infrastructure on Enterprise Services now
you should have a smooth upgrade path to the next .NET communication
framework (codename "Indigo" - part of Longhorn).

Nov 22 '05 #3

P: n/a
NO!

The OP asked about JavaBeans. JavaBeans is a component model and a set of
conventions posited by Java for allowing classes to be introspected and
toolable. In .NET, every class is a component. The .NET class is the
direct analog to a JavaBean.

If the OP is talking about Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) , that is something
different. There is no direct analog in .NET for EJB, and it's a durn good
thing, too. EJB is much criticized these days for being complex, and hard
to use. EJB combines remoting, transactions, concurrency, persistence,
thread control, pooling, and component lifecycle all in one gloppy model.
yech.

In .NET,
- the System.EnterpriseServices namespace provides transactions, lifecycle,
and pooling. also some other things.
- There are several different ways to do remoting (among them, .NET
Remoting and webservices)
- lifecycle depends on the hosting model you use (Windows Service, versus
ASMX, or ASPX, or COM+ server app, self-hosted, etc...)
- persistence is generally table-oriented via typed DataSet, though there
are some O-R frameworks (eg, nHibernate)
- concurrency is handled by you
- threading is also under the app's control.
-Dino

"Patrik L÷wendahl [C# MVP]"
<pa*********************************************@h ome.se> wrote in message
news:%2******************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
I would worry alot, COM interp doesn't come cheap, nor does it come with
out complexity.

JavaBeans are just server components right? so you could instead build
remoting objects ( which is server components).

Depending on what services you need, there's probably a native .net way to
do it.

--
Patrik L÷wendahl [C# MVP]
www.cshrp.net - "Elegant code by witty programmers"

'"richlm" <ri*****@h0tmai1.com> wrote in message
news:eR**************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
The closest equivalent is Enterprise Services (also known as COM+ and
Component Services).

Just search "Enterprise services" on google/msdn.

As a start try the following link "Understanding Enterprise Services
(COM+) in .NET"
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...ml/entserv.asp
Yes "under the covers" this technology uses COM+. Don't worry about that.
If you base your communication infrastructure on Enterprise Services now
you should have a smooth upgrade path to the next .NET communication
framework (codename "Indigo" - part of Longhorn).


Nov 22 '05 #4

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