By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
446,218 Members | 1,195 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 446,218 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

Static variables - saving state!

P: n/a
Hello,

I hate to admit it, but there have been times where I needed to persist a
value in an asp.net app, and instead of using properties {get:set} I simply
changed the variable to static - which maintained the value.

My question is - what are the potential hazards?

ie:

public static string firstName;
public string LastName;
private string PhoneNumber;

by doing this above, I can assign the fistName value, post back a page - and
still maintain the value..

Im sure (other than performance) I may be playing with danger here.

I have used static quit a bit on classes that do not need instances (mostly
my data classes use static method to access/modify data) .. this I understand.

What I dont exactly get is using static members in a non static class. If
someone could explain this to me better, that would be great.

thanks,
Nov 22 '05 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
1 Reply


P: n/a
I think that static variables in ASP.NET will have application scope and
exist until the website stops. If you need to maintain state this way, you
should probably use the Session object which will disappear when the session
dies.

"aiKeith" <ai*****@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:32**********************************@microsof t.com...
Hello,

I hate to admit it, but there have been times where I needed to persist a
value in an asp.net app, and instead of using properties {get:set} I simply changed the variable to static - which maintained the value.

My question is - what are the potential hazards?

ie:

public static string firstName;
public string LastName;
private string PhoneNumber;

by doing this above, I can assign the fistName value, post back a page - and still maintain the value..

Im sure (other than performance) I may be playing with danger here.

I have used static quit a bit on classes that do not need instances (mostly my data classes use static method to access/modify data) .. this I understand.
What I dont exactly get is using static members in a non static class. If
someone could explain this to me better, that would be great.

thanks,

Nov 22 '05 #2

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.