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using C++ visual Studio.net to write programs for c++ 6.0

P: n/a
I am a student taking a computer class programmning with ms visual C++. The
college is using ms visual C++ 6.0 on it's computers. I purchased ms visual
studio.net (Academic) (ver 2003) which is more up to date. How can I use my
program to write C++ 6.0 the same way I am be instructed in class? Do I need
to buy visual C++ 6.0 I already paid for one program I would like to make use
of it at home it gives me more time to learn. Thanks Charlie
Nov 17 '05 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
Your best bet would be to purchase the VC++6 downgrade. It's dirt cheap.
Search for "downgrade".
"Charlie" <Ch*****@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:8B**********************************@microsof t.com...
I am a student taking a computer class programmning with ms visual C++. The college is using ms visual C++ 6.0 on it's computers. I purchased ms visual studio.net (Academic) (ver 2003) which is more up to date. How can I use my program to write C++ 6.0 the same way I am be instructed in class? Do I need to buy visual C++ 6.0 I already paid for one program I would like to make use of it at home it gives me more time to learn. Thanks Charlie

Nov 17 '05 #2

P: n/a

"Charlie" <Ch*****@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:8B**********************************@microsof t.com...
I am a student taking a computer class programmning with ms visual C++.
The
college is using ms visual C++ 6.0 on it's computers. I purchased ms
visual
studio.net (Academic) (ver 2003) which is more up to date. How can I use
my
program to write C++ 6.0 the same way I am be instructed in class? Do I
need
to buy visual C++ 6.0 I already paid for one program I would like to make
use
of it at home it gives me more time to learn. Thanks Charlie


I agree with BobF for several reasons, but first, here's the link to
downgrade information:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/vbasic/pre...downgrade.aspx

My reasons why the downgrade may be safer for you are as follows:
If your instructor is teaching "pre-standard" C++ (and, I have no way of
knowing, as the 6.0 compiler supports most new stuff, but also supports
things no longer in the new standard), some of the code/preprocessor
directives he/she teaches will not work in the VC 7.1 C++ compiler (the one
in Visual Studio 2003), and you may well be left to figure the necessary
changes out for yourself.
Have you discussed you situation with your instructor, to see what advice
he/she might offer?
What textbook are you using and what's the publication date?
Hint: If your instructor is teaching:

#include <iostream.h>

and does not realize the directive should now be:

#include <iostream>, typically followed by (in beginning texts)
using namespace std;

then you should go for the downgrade ASAP.

--
Peter [MVP Visual Developer]
Jack of all trades, master of none.
Nov 17 '05 #3

P: n/a
In article news:<#y**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl>, Peter van der Goes
wrote:
Hint: If your instructor is teaching:

#include <iostream.h>

and does not realize the directive should now be:

#include <iostream>, typically followed by (in beginning texts)
using namespace std;

then you should go for the downgrade ASAP.
Correction: If your instructor is teaching:

#include <iostream.h>

and does not realize the directive should now be:

#include <iostream>

you should change your instructor!
typically followed by (in beginning texts)
using namespace std;


Yeah, "typically followed in beginning texts" is true enough, but "using
namespace" is really a bad habit to get into.

Cheers,
Daniel.
Nov 17 '05 #4

P: n/a

"Daniel James" <wa*********@nospam.aaisp.org> wrote in message
news:VA******************@nospam.aaisp.org...
In article news:<#y**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl>, Peter van der
Goes
wrote:
Hint: If your instructor is teaching:

#include <iostream.h>

and does not realize the directive should now be:

#include <iostream>, typically followed by (in beginning texts)
using namespace std;

then you should go for the downgrade ASAP.


Correction: If your instructor is teaching:

#include <iostream.h>

and does not realize the directive should now be:

#include <iostream>

you should change your instructor!

<snip>
I agree with the sentiment, but the OP may be stuck in a situation where
there is no alternative but to continue the class in which he in enrolled,
hence the suggestion to downgrade.

--
Peter [MVP Visual Developer]
Jack of all trades, master of none.
Nov 17 '05 #5

P: n/a
In article news:<#X**************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl>, Peter van
der Goes wrote:
I agree with the sentiment, but the OP may be stuck in a situation
where there is no alternative but to continue the class in which
he in enrolled, hence the suggestion to downgrade.


That is possible, I agree ... and the matter may well be moot because
the instructor may be using standard iostreams with VC6 (or, at
least, not using iostream.h).

However, I'd argue that if the instructor *is* teaching iostream.h in
2005 then it is better to drop out of the course now than have to
unlearn it all later. Such a teacher should be approached -- if
necessary using what we're saying here as ammunition -- and asked to
update the course materials, and if that fails the instructor's
employer should be asked to replace the instructor.

Cheers,
Daniel.


Nov 17 '05 #6

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