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VC++ .NET 2003 Pro and VC++ Toolkit 2003: Optmizing code

P: n/a
Hi there
I'm switching from VC++ 6.0 to VC++ .NET 2003. Since there is no stand-alone
version of VC++ .NET 2003 Pro, I went and purchased the Standard version,
which does not have an optimizing compiler.

I have been made aware of the existence of the VC++ Toolkit 2003:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/visualc/vctoolkit2003/

This toolkit is basically the compiler and linker that come with VS .NET
2003 Pro. I would like to use this compiler and linker with my VC++ .NET
2003 Standard IDE.

I could not find any resources or HOWTO's online so I tried to figure it out
by myself. I went in Tools/Options/Projects/VC++ Directories, and added the
toolkit's "bin" folder to the very top of the "Executable files" list, the
toolkit's "include" folder to the top of the "Include files" list, and the
toolkit's "lib" folder to the top of the "Library files" list.

I turned on the banner display in the build options to see which compiler
ended up being invoked; it seems that my directory trick is working, as this
is the banner I get in the output window:
Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version 13.10.3077 for
80x86

The banner I get when I remove the toolkit "executable files" directory
entry is:
Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Standard Compiler Version 13.10.3077 for 80x86

So I know the proper compiler is being called... However when I look at the
build log, this line has been written at the very top:
This edition of Visual C++ does not support the optimizing compiler.

Also, my resulting binary is indentical regardless of which compiler was
used (same binary size). Also, most optimization settings in my project's
properties are grayed out.

At this point I'm starting to think that the Standard IDE simply does not
allow me to change the optimization parameters using their settings dialogs.
Does that mean that I have to figure out which command-line parameters to
send the compiler and linker, and put those somewhere in the build settings?
Does that also mean that I'll always get this "This edition of Visual C++
does not support the optimizing compiler" line in all my build logs?
I'd appreciate any tips and suggestions. My goal is to have a seamless
integration of the optimizing compiler to my Standard installation, meaning
I'd like to avoid having to play with project settings every time I create a
new project. Has anyone out there figured out how to use the optimizing
compiler with VC++ .NET 2003 Standard?
Thanks!

- Alex
Nov 17 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
Hi Alex,
Also, my resulting binary is indentical regardless of which compiler
was used (same binary size). Also, most optimization settings in my
project's properties are grayed out.
The optimazation settings must be set in the "C++|Command Line" section!

At this point I'm starting to think that the Standard IDE simply does
not allow me to change the optimization parameters
Thats true, but you can specify them "by hand" (see above)
Does that also mean that I'll always
get this "This edition of Visual C++ does not support the optimizing
compiler" line in all my build logs?
Yes.

I'd appreciate any tips and suggestions. My goal is to have a seamless
integration of the optimizing compiler to my Standard installation,
meaning I'd like to avoid having to play with project settings every
time I create a new project.


This is not supported.

--
Greetings
Jochen

My blog about Win32 and .NET
http://blog.kalmbachnet.de/
Nov 17 '05 #2

P: n/a
Hi Jochen,

The optimazation settings must be set in the "C++|Command Line" section!


That's what I was thinking. :) Oh well, no pretty Settings dialog for me!

Does that also mean that I'll always
get this "This edition of Visual C++ does not support the optimizing
compiler" line in all my build logs?


Yes.


And (sorry, I just want to make sure I understand), as long as I set the
proper command-line options, this warning message does not actually mean
anything, correct? I mean, would there be a difference in the resulting
binary between a C++ project compiled with optimizations with VS .NET 2003
Pro versus the same project compiled with VC++ .NET 2003 Std and the
Toolkit, given that my command-line optimization-related flags are the same?
Thanks!

- Alex
Nov 17 '05 #3

P: n/a
Hi Alex,
And (sorry, I just want to make sure I understand), as long as I set
the proper command-line options, this warning message does not
actually mean anything, correct?
Yes.

I mean, would there be a difference in the resulting binary between a C++ project compiled with
optimizations with VS .NET 2003 Pro versus the same project compiled
with VC++ .NET 2003 Std and the Toolkit, given that my command-line
optimization-related flags are the same?


It should produce the "same" exe.

--
Greetings
Jochen

My blog about Win32 and .NET
http://blog.kalmbachnet.de/
Nov 17 '05 #4

P: n/a
Thanks Jochen! Much appreciated.

- Alex
Nov 17 '05 #5

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