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default build configurations

P: n/a
I would like to have my new C++ projects start out with two configurations, UnicodeDebug and UnicodeRelease, instead of the standard Debug and Release configurations that Visual Studio always creates. Is there a way to configure Visual Studio to do this

Thanks in advance

-
Pete H
Nov 17 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
HI,I have been using C# with .NET for years, and before that used C++ in VS6
C++ without any problems.When I tried C++ in VS.NET the default build always
fails. It doesn't tell what happened, just creates HTML file.I need to know
how to troubleshoot it, where is the log. The so called RSP000005.rsp is the
command, not the output.Task list is blank!It works perfectly fine from
command line, e.g. cl.exe /Zi /clr HelloVC.cpp.I need to know why the VS.NET
adds dozens of step for just HelloWorld Application, and how to make it just
use "/Zi /clr" that work.Here is the cryptic log: (By the way it even
deletes the RSP000005.rsp file, and there is no error except"Build log was
saved at
"file://f:\Edixml\Dev\ConsoleWin321\Debug\BuildLog.htm"Con soleWin321 - 1
error(s), 0 warning(s)"Creating temporary file
"f:\Edixml\Dev\ConsoleWin321\Debug\RSP000005.r sp" with contents
[
/Od /D "WIN32" /D "_DEBUG" /D "_CONSOLE" /D "_MBCS" /Gm /EHsc /RTC1 /MLd
/Yu"stdafx.h" /Fp"Debug/ConsoleWin321.pch" /Fo"Debug/" /Fd"Debug/vc70.pdb"
/W3 /c /Wp64 /ZI /TP
..\ConsoleWin321.cpp
]
Creating command line "cl.exe
@f:\Edixml\Dev\ConsoleWin321\Debug\RSP000005.rsp /nologo"
Creating temporary file "f:\Edixml\Dev\ConsoleWin321\Debug\RSP000006.r sp"
with contents
[
/Od /D "WIN32" /D "_DEBUG" /D "_CONSOLE" /D "_MBCS" /Gm /EHsc /RTC1 /MLd
/Yc"stdafx.h" /Fp"Debug/ConsoleWin321.pch" /Fo"Debug/" /Fd"Debug/vc70.pdb"
/W3 /c /Wp64 /ZI /TP
..\stdafx.cpp
]
Creating command line "cl.exe
@f:\Edixml\Dev\ConsoleWin321\Debug\RSP000006.rsp /nologo"
"Pete H" <an*******@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:C3**********************************@microsof t.com...
I would like to have my new C++ projects start out with two configurations, UnicodeDebug and UnicodeRelease, instead of the standard
Debug and Release configurations that Visual Studio always creates. Is
there a way to configure Visual Studio to do this?
Thanks in advance.

--
Pete H

Nov 17 '05 #2

P: n/a
I figured out! It is the environment variables that were not setup properly
by VS.NET
I had to run: "E:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio .NET
2003\Common7\Tools\vsvars32.bat" before starting the devenv

Thanks anyway!

"Fakher Halim" <fa****@msn.com> wrote in message
news:ut*************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
HI,I have been using C# with .NET for years, and before that used C++ in VS6 C++ without any problems.When I tried C++ in VS.NET the default build always fails. It doesn't tell what happened, just creates HTML file.I need to know how to troubleshoot it, where is the log. The so called RSP000005.rsp is the command, not the output.Task list is blank!It works perfectly fine from
command line, e.g. cl.exe /Zi /clr HelloVC.cpp.I need to know why the VS.NET adds dozens of step for just HelloWorld Application, and how to make it just use "/Zi /clr" that work.Here is the cryptic log: (By the way it even
deletes the RSP000005.rsp file, and there is no error except"Build log was
saved at
"file://f:\Edixml\Dev\ConsoleWin321\Debug\BuildLog.htm"Con soleWin321 - 1
error(s), 0 warning(s)"Creating temporary file
"f:\Edixml\Dev\ConsoleWin321\Debug\RSP000005.r sp" with contents
[
/Od /D "WIN32" /D "_DEBUG" /D "_CONSOLE" /D "_MBCS" /Gm /EHsc /RTC1 /MLd
/Yu"stdafx.h" /Fp"Debug/ConsoleWin321.pch" /Fo"Debug/" /Fd"Debug/vc70.pdb"
/W3 /c /Wp64 /ZI /TP
.\ConsoleWin321.cpp
]
Creating command line "cl.exe
@f:\Edixml\Dev\ConsoleWin321\Debug\RSP000005.rsp /nologo"
Creating temporary file "f:\Edixml\Dev\ConsoleWin321\Debug\RSP000006.r sp"
with contents
[
/Od /D "WIN32" /D "_DEBUG" /D "_CONSOLE" /D "_MBCS" /Gm /EHsc /RTC1 /MLd
/Yc"stdafx.h" /Fp"Debug/ConsoleWin321.pch" /Fo"Debug/" /Fd"Debug/vc70.pdb"
/W3 /c /Wp64 /ZI /TP
.\stdafx.cpp
]
Creating command line "cl.exe
@f:\Edixml\Dev\ConsoleWin321\Debug\RSP000006.rsp /nologo"
"Pete H" <an*******@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:C3**********************************@microsof t.com...
I would like to have my new C++ projects start out with two

configurations, UnicodeDebug and UnicodeRelease, instead of the standard
Debug and Release configurations that Visual Studio always creates. Is
there a way to configure Visual Studio to do this?

Thanks in advance.

--
Pete H


Nov 17 '05 #3

P: n/a
> command line, e.g. cl.exe /Zi /clr HelloVC.cpp.I need to know why the VS.NET
adds dozens of step for just HelloWorld Application, and how to make it just
use "/Zi /clr" that work.Here is the cryptic log: (By the way it even


I don't have an answer for the rest of your problem, but there is a
reason why there are extra command line switches by default. Most
applications are a bit larger than "Hello World" and Visual Studio will
sets up a default environment that is more appropriate for those larger
apps. This means turning on specific optimizations, and other features
that are more likely to be needed.

You can probably wittle your options down to /Zi /clr. In the
Configuration Properties, you can toggle on/off most of the switches and
parameters. In the "Command Line" section, it will list all of the
options that the IDE will send to the compiler, and you can use this
list to verify that what options you want on are actually on and vice-versa.

It sounds like your program itself is correct, but there doesn't seem to
be enough information to troubleshoot. You can check the BuildLog.htm
file that is output in your Debug or Release folder for clues (indeed
part of it is pasted in your message). You might also check that the
linker is outputting the file to the location you expect.

Thobias Jones
Nov 17 '05 #4

P: n/a
Thobias,
Thanks for your help. The reason I figured is simple: ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
were not correctly setup by the VS.NET 2003 installer. I have to run:
"E:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio .NET
2003\Common7\Tools\vsvars32.bat" before starting the devenv from the shell.
If I start VS.NET without that setup (each time), it would just fail.
Actually I pasted complete BuildLog.htm. It only tells what action were
taken by VS.NET, not what the outcome of those action. It is not logged
anywhere. To make it even more difficult do diagnose is that fact that it
just blows those temporary .rsp files. Of course if I manually feed all the
environment variables those are modified by vsvars32.bat into Windows 2000
(pain to work), it would work fine. But I thought that was the job of VS
installer. I tried to remove the whole VC++, reboot, and the reinstall; but
it never does its job. May be there is a less painful VC++.NET environment
variable option used not known to me. Please let me know if there is one.
Thanks for you reply, Thobias!!

Fakher Halim
"Thobias Jones" <tjones@no_spam.humanhead.com> wrote in message
news:40B7484E.4010707@no_spam.humanhead.com...
command line, e.g. cl.exe /Zi /clr HelloVC.cpp.I need to know why the VS.NET adds dozens of step for just HelloWorld Application, and how to make it just use "/Zi /clr" that work.Here is the cryptic log: (By the way it even
I don't have an answer for the rest of your problem, but there is a
reason why there are extra command line switches by default. Most
applications are a bit larger than "Hello World" and Visual Studio will
sets up a default environment that is more appropriate for those larger
apps. This means turning on specific optimizations, and other features
that are more likely to be needed.

You can probably wittle your options down to /Zi /clr. In the
Configuration Properties, you can toggle on/off most of the switches and
parameters. In the "Command Line" section, it will list all of the
options that the IDE will send to the compiler, and you can use this
list to verify that what options you want on are actually on and

vice-versa.
It sounds like your program itself is correct, but there doesn't seem to
be enough information to troubleshoot. You can check the BuildLog.htm
file that is output in your Debug or Release folder for clues (indeed
part of it is pasted in your message). You might also check that the
linker is outputting the file to the location you expect.

Thobias Jones

Nov 17 '05 #5

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