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GDI+ question

P: n/a
We create VC++ programs that does some GDI drawing functionality.
I discovered GDI+ and this seems to be a big step forward, and appears to be
standard available in Windows XP and Windows Server 2003.
But since .NET also uses it, does that mean that it gets automatically
installed when I install a .NET framework on a Windows 2000?

Nov 17 '05 #1
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7 Replies


P: n/a
You may want to post your question on the System.Drawing news group. There is a coder that follows that group that is up on the GDI/GDI+ and he might be able to help you. He also generally responds quickly

Bob
Nov 17 '05 #2

P: n/a
> You may want to post your question on the System.Drawing news group.
There is a coder that follows that group that is up on the GDI/GDI+ and
he might be able to help you. He also generally responds quickly.


Ok thanks. :-)
Nov 17 '05 #3

P: n/a
> > You may want to post your question on the System.Drawing news group.
There is a coder that follows that group that is up on the GDI/GDI+ and
he might be able to help you. He also generally responds quickly.


Ok thanks. :-)

I cannot find any "System.Drawing" newsgroup in my outlook express
newsgroups list.
Any tips how the complete name is? Something like this:
microsoft.public.dotnet.System.Drawing?
Nov 17 '05 #4

P: n/a
"BobTheHacker" <an*******@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:46**********************************@microsof t.com...
You may want to post your question on the System.Drawing news group. There is a coder that follows that group that is up on the GDI/GDI+ and he
might be able to help you. He also generally responds quickly.
Bob


Why? The question is completely relevant here. GDI+ is a native library and
does not require managed environment (.NET).

To answer the original question, GDI+ is part of the Windows Platform SDK.
Just install the latest platform SDK and you will have everything you need.
The documentation is pretty good too and more than enough to get you
started. You will need to redistribute gdiplus.dll for platforms earlier
than XP.

Best,
Sarat Venugopal
www.huelix.com

Nov 17 '05 #5

P: n/a
Framework.Drawing

Steev

<Ol**********@skyscan.be> wrote in message
news:40***********************@news.skynet.be...
You may want to post your question on the System.Drawing news group.
There is a coder that follows that group that is up on the GDI/GDI+ and he might be able to help you. He also generally responds quickly.


Ok thanks. :-)

I cannot find any "System.Drawing" newsgroup in my outlook express
newsgroups list.
Any tips how the complete name is? Something like this:
microsoft.public.dotnet.System.Drawing?

Nov 17 '05 #6

P: n/a
> We create VC++ programs that does some GDI drawing functionality.
I discovered GDI+ and this seems to be a big step forward, and appears to be standard available in Windows XP and Windows Server 2003.
But since .NET also uses it, does that mean that it gets automatically
installed when I install a .NET framework on a Windows 2000?

I asked this question, so I also want to add the answer to what I
discovered.

GDI+ basically consist of one dll called gdiplus.dll (1.6 MB).
Windows XP automatically contains this GDI+ dll installed in the windows
folder, but older windows versions do not.

Now, .NET, uses GDI+, and it appears that this gdiplus.dll is installed
where the .NET framework is installed.
(C:\WINNT\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v1.1.4322)
This means that although GDI+ is installed to be used by .NET, none- .NET
programs have not access to this gdiplus.dll, it must still be copied to
either the windows folder or the program folder in order to use it.

Using GDI+ is simpler than expected for none-.NET programs, just put the
gdiplus.dll in the same folder of your executable and off you go, running on
OS that does not have GDI+ installed.

GDI+ is very nice but I see many (confusing) Internet reports that GDI is
much faster than GDI+, because graphics card manufacturers optimize for GDI
performance and ignore GDI+. Although parts of GDI+ uses GDI and this would
speed up with a new graphics card.
Also ofcourse GDI+ does far more processing than GDI does. e.g. scaling,
transforming, rotating,... And is a pure OOP class set.

I love the fact that it is implemented in the .NET framework. :-)
But sadly enought I also develop conventional exe code so stuck with GID--.
Nov 17 '05 #7

P: n/a
From what I've read, it's unlikely GDI+ will be given hardware acceleration
by the graphics card companies, since Longhorn will be using a different
system. It's a real shame as it's a nice API, but if you need the hardware
to help you might have to stick with the old stuff.

Steve

<Ol**********@skyscan.be> wrote in message
news:40**********************@news.skynet.be...
We create VC++ programs that does some GDI drawing functionality.
I discovered GDI+ and this seems to be a big step forward, and appears
to be
standard available in Windows XP and Windows Server 2003.
But since .NET also uses it, does that mean that it gets automatically
installed when I install a .NET framework on a Windows 2000?
I asked this question, so I also want to add the answer to what I
discovered.

GDI+ basically consist of one dll called gdiplus.dll (1.6 MB).
Windows XP automatically contains this GDI+ dll installed in the windows
folder, but older windows versions do not.

Now, .NET, uses GDI+, and it appears that this gdiplus.dll is installed
where the .NET framework is installed.
(C:\WINNT\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v1.1.4322)
This means that although GDI+ is installed to be used by .NET, none- .NET
programs have not access to this gdiplus.dll, it must still be copied to
either the windows folder or the program folder in order to use it.

Using GDI+ is simpler than expected for none-.NET programs, just put the
gdiplus.dll in the same folder of your executable and off you go, running

on OS that does not have GDI+ installed.

GDI+ is very nice but I see many (confusing) Internet reports that GDI is
much faster than GDI+, because graphics card manufacturers optimize for GDI performance and ignore GDI+. Although parts of GDI+ uses GDI and this would speed up with a new graphics card.
Also ofcourse GDI+ does far more processing than GDI does. e.g. scaling,
transforming, rotating,... And is a pure OOP class set.

I love the fact that it is implemented in the .NET framework. :-)
But sadly enought I also develop conventional exe code so stuck with GID--.

Nov 17 '05 #8

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