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Oracle client and .net

P: n/a
I want to connect to an oracle database from my client pc, OS is win2k or XP.

Can I connect to an oracle database without having the full oracle client
installed? If so what would be the minimum install on the client to get this
connection? Oracle version is 9i?

I found the .NET Managed Provider for Oracle and it looked like it still
needed the oracle client?

Mike
Jul 21 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a

"Mike D" <Mi***@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:D4**********************************@microsof t.com...
I want to connect to an oracle database from my client pc, OS is win2k or XP.
Can I connect to an oracle database without having the full oracle client
installed? If so what would be the minimum install on the client to get this connection? Oracle version is 9i?

I found the .NET Managed Provider for Oracle and it looked like it still
needed the oracle client?

Mike


Yes, you must install the Oracle Client. Even though you may have one or
more providers available, all of them would be dependant upon the actual
client being installed. The various providers are intermediary interfaces to
the underlying Oracle Client, and can expose varying degrees of the actual
Oracle Clients capabilities.

IIRC, the Oracle Client installer has a "minimum" option.

Gerald
Jul 21 '05 #2

P: n/a
Thanks for the reply. Are you familiar with the ".NET Managed Provider for
Oracle" found here
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/d...displaylang=en. What does it do?

Thanks again
Mike

"Gerald Hernandez" wrote:

"Mike D" <Mi***@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:D4**********************************@microsof t.com...
I want to connect to an oracle database from my client pc, OS is win2k or

XP.

Can I connect to an oracle database without having the full oracle client
installed? If so what would be the minimum install on the client to get

this
connection? Oracle version is 9i?

I found the .NET Managed Provider for Oracle and it looked like it still
needed the oracle client?

Mike


Yes, you must install the Oracle Client. Even though you may have one or
more providers available, all of them would be dependant upon the actual
client being installed. The various providers are intermediary interfaces to
the underlying Oracle Client, and can expose varying degrees of the actual
Oracle Clients capabilities.

IIRC, the Oracle Client installer has a "minimum" option.

Gerald

Jul 21 '05 #3

P: n/a

"Mike D" <Mi***@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:A6**********************************@microsof t.com...
Thanks for the reply. Are you familiar with the ".NET Managed Provider for Oracle" found here
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/d...displaylang=en.
What does it do?
Thanks again
Mike


Generic ADO is "simple" and easy to use. However, it provides only generic
database access. You don't typically have access to the specialized
capabilities of whatever underlying database system you are connecting to.
Well, not easily, and it is optimized mostly for MS SQL Server. The problem
is that there are frequently things you need to do with Oracle that work
differently than SQL Server. Because of this, the normal ADO providers just
don't work all that well with Oracle. Note that it is still possible, and in
some cases practical, to use generic ADO to interface to Oracle, but with
limited functionality.

The native Oracle Client is very powerful and feature rich. However, it is
far from easy to use, and so specialized that it severely limits the
possibility of code reuse; Which ADO does very well.

The ".NET Managed Provider for Oracle" provides an in-between step. It
combines the standardized interfaces and ease of use of generic ADO, but
also is tuned to work closely with the capabilities of Oracle. So you get a
reasonable compromise between the power of the Oracle native drivers and the
simplicity and portability of ADO. Note, that it still interfaces with
whatever Oracle Client driver you have installed, it in itself is not a
driver, but a user friendly interface to the driver that is installed.

Unless you are writing an application that requires the absolute best
possible performance, access to low level objects, and only works with a
specific version of Oracle, then I would use the .NET Managed Provider for
Oracle. If you do need that low level access, then you could use the native
Oracle Driver. But even then I would recommend keeping that to a minimum and
only when necessary. Just not that friendly IMHO.

Gerald

Jul 21 '05 #4

P: n/a
Thanks very much for the detailed reply. I am new to Oracle and have alot to
learn.

Thanks
Mike

"Gerald Hernandez" wrote:

"Mike D" <Mi***@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:A6**********************************@microsof t.com...
Thanks for the reply. Are you familiar with the ".NET Managed Provider

for
Oracle" found here

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/d...displaylang=en.
What does it do?

Thanks again
Mike


Generic ADO is "simple" and easy to use. However, it provides only generic
database access. You don't typically have access to the specialized
capabilities of whatever underlying database system you are connecting to.
Well, not easily, and it is optimized mostly for MS SQL Server. The problem
is that there are frequently things you need to do with Oracle that work
differently than SQL Server. Because of this, the normal ADO providers just
don't work all that well with Oracle. Note that it is still possible, and in
some cases practical, to use generic ADO to interface to Oracle, but with
limited functionality.

The native Oracle Client is very powerful and feature rich. However, it is
far from easy to use, and so specialized that it severely limits the
possibility of code reuse; Which ADO does very well.

The ".NET Managed Provider for Oracle" provides an in-between step. It
combines the standardized interfaces and ease of use of generic ADO, but
also is tuned to work closely with the capabilities of Oracle. So you get a
reasonable compromise between the power of the Oracle native drivers and the
simplicity and portability of ADO. Note, that it still interfaces with
whatever Oracle Client driver you have installed, it in itself is not a
driver, but a user friendly interface to the driver that is installed.

Unless you are writing an application that requires the absolute best
possible performance, access to low level objects, and only works with a
specific version of Oracle, then I would use the .NET Managed Provider for
Oracle. If you do need that low level access, then you could use the native
Oracle Driver. But even then I would recommend keeping that to a minimum and
only when necessary. Just not that friendly IMHO.

Gerald


Jul 21 '05 #5

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