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.net calling java, for the 100th time

P: n/a
c
So far it looks like we have these options for calling our java based API
from a .NET application:

1) http://www.jnbridge.com, about $500 per machine/developer
2) re-write java app in Visual J++ (Microsoft java) - then it will
integrate nicely with .NET.
3) use web services
4) use JNI

Option 2 isn't possible, because our java based app is a huge server side
beast. Not sure how the JNI option would work. Our product doesn't support
web services yet, so option 3 is out.

Did I miss anything?

thanks.

chris
Jul 21 '05 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
"c" <me@somewhere.com> wrote in
news:eK**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
So far it looks like we have these options for calling our java based API
from a .NET application:

1) http://www.jnbridge.com, about $500 per machine/developer
2) re-write java app in Visual J++ (Microsoft java) - then it will
integrate nicely with .NET.
3) use web services
4) use JNI
...
Did I miss anything?


I think there are many Java-COM bridges out there; .NET can play with COM
components nicely, so that could be a good way to go.
But the answer really depends on what you want to do: Any kind of
IPC/component technology could solve your problem: sockets, CORBA, memory
mapped files (not sure if java has native support for those)

Niki
Jul 21 '05 #2

P: n/a
perhaps this article will help.

http://www.devx.com/interop/Article/19928/1954?pf=true

Just because your application doesn't support web services (yet), how is #3
out?
You can add web services to the Java side, and call them from the .NET side.
What's so bad about that?

Or, you could create a set of facade classes that call your Java app, and
compile those classes in Visual J# (Java syntax), and make them available as
web services or COM components. That is probably the easiest way.

--- Nick

"c" <me@somewhere.com> wrote in message
news:eK**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
So far it looks like we have these options for calling our java based API
from a .NET application:

1) http://www.jnbridge.com, about $500 per machine/developer
2) re-write java app in Visual J++ (Microsoft java) - then it will
integrate nicely with .NET.
3) use web services
4) use JNI

Option 2 isn't possible, because our java based app is a huge server side
beast. Not sure how the JNI option would work. Our product doesn't support web services yet, so option 3 is out.

Did I miss anything?

thanks.

chris

Jul 21 '05 #3

P: n/a
Concur with Nick's Option 1 because it is the most decoupled.
Option 2 ties the solution to J++ and COM, both Windows only technologies.

"Nick Malik" <ni*******@hotmail.nospam.com> wrote in message
news:8Mszc.36403$eu.1237@attbi_s02...
perhaps this article will help.

http://www.devx.com/interop/Article/19928/1954?pf=true

Just because your application doesn't support web services (yet), how is #3 out?
You can add web services to the Java side, and call them from the .NET side. What's so bad about that?

Or, you could create a set of facade classes that call your Java app, and
compile those classes in Visual J# (Java syntax), and make them available as web services or COM components. That is probably the easiest way.

--- Nick

"c" <me@somewhere.com> wrote in message
news:eK**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
So far it looks like we have these options for calling our java based API from a .NET application:

1) http://www.jnbridge.com, about $500 per machine/developer
2) re-write java app in Visual J++ (Microsoft java) - then it will
integrate nicely with .NET.
3) use web services
4) use JNI

Option 2 isn't possible, because our java based app is a huge server side beast. Not sure how the JNI option would work. Our product doesn't

support
web services yet, so option 3 is out.

Did I miss anything?

thanks.

chris



Jul 21 '05 #4

P: n/a
"c" <me@somewhere.com> wrote in
news:eK**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
So far it looks like we have these options for calling our java based API
from a .NET application:

1) http://www.jnbridge.com, about $500 per machine/developer


Hey folks --

JNBridgePro isn't that expensive. You can deploy it for $95/machine for the
SE version. That's for each .NET machine on which our components reside;
you can deploy the Java components on as you want. There are also volume
discounts. See http://www.jnbridge.com/pricing.htm for more information.

The development license is indeed $495 for one developer seat, but you
likely only need one developer license.

Compared to the developer time needed to roll your own .NET/Java interop
solution, JNBridgePro is a good deal.

Wayne
____________________________________
Wayne Citrin
JNBridge, LLC
ci****@jnbridge.com
www.jnbridge.com
Spanning the Worlds of Java and .NET
____________________________________
Jul 21 '05 #5

P: n/a
Another option is this :
http://www.codeproject.com/threads/bridgewinjava.asp

Kapil Maheshwari
"c" <me@somewhere.com> wrote in message
news:eK**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
So far it looks like we have these options for calling our java based API
from a .NET application:

1) http://www.jnbridge.com, about $500 per machine/developer
2) re-write java app in Visual J++ (Microsoft java) - then it will
integrate nicely with .NET.
3) use web services
4) use JNI

Option 2 isn't possible, because our java based app is a huge server side
beast. Not sure how the JNI option would work. Our product doesn't support web services yet, so option 3 is out.

Did I miss anything?

thanks.

chris

Jul 21 '05 #6

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