By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
458,051 Members | 1,229 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 458,051 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

Equivalent .NET architecture for a J2EE app?

P: n/a
So I can focus on the correct areas of research, I was wondering if someone
could give me the .NET equivelents for this J2EE architecture:

JSP's make calls to local JavaBean Controls. The controls do a JNDI lookup
to invoke methods on EJB's. The EJB's use local Java classes, and these
classes use JDBC to do database work.

Example:

Login.jsp contains "import xxx.LoginControl", and invokes the "login"
method.
LoginControl.login does a JNDI lookup for "LoginWorker", which is an EJB. It
invokes the "login" method of the EJB
LoginWorker.login does some stuff, and eventually calls
LoginDataSource.login, which uses JDBC to talk to the database.

What would be the appropriate areas of .NET to concentrate on? (JSP->ASPX,
EJB->?, JDBC->ADO?)

Whats the equivalent of the "Application Server" (WebSphere/etc)?

Thanks.
Jul 21 '05 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
6 Replies


P: n/a
The JSP would be ASPX, essentially, with some difference in the byte compile
and coding methodology.

There is no direct EJB equivalent. You would most likely end up with a
combination of Framework components and custom classes, in your solution.

JDBC and ADO.NET - sort of. But JDBC is, technically, a bit more focused on
the connectivity, much like ODBC. You can use ODBC with ADO.NET, and it is
possible to do the same with JDBC. But, many Java developers call more than
the data conn stack JDBC, so ADO .NET could be an equivalent, if that is the
case. The portion of ADO.NET that sits in the client namepaces, like
SqlClient and OracleClient is technically closer to JDBC, but there are
still some differences.

Much of what you are looking at in Java are Frameworks built on top of the
language. The Framework direction for Sun and Microsoft are widely
different.

--
Gregory A. Beamer
MVP; MCP: +I, SE, SD, DBA

************************************************
Think Outside the Box!
************************************************
"Frank Rachel" <fr*****@navisys.com> wrote in message
news:%2******************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
So I can focus on the correct areas of research, I was wondering if someone could give me the .NET equivelents for this J2EE architecture:

JSP's make calls to local JavaBean Controls. The controls do a JNDI lookup
to invoke methods on EJB's. The EJB's use local Java classes, and these
classes use JDBC to do database work.

Example:

Login.jsp contains "import xxx.LoginControl", and invokes the "login"
method.
LoginControl.login does a JNDI lookup for "LoginWorker", which is an EJB. It invokes the "login" method of the EJB
LoginWorker.login does some stuff, and eventually calls
LoginDataSource.login, which uses JDBC to talk to the database.

What would be the appropriate areas of .NET to concentrate on? (JSP->ASPX,
EJB->?, JDBC->ADO?)

Whats the equivalent of the "Application Server" (WebSphere/etc)?

Thanks.

Jul 21 '05 #2

P: n/a

Hi Cowboy

Check out: http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en...asp?frame=true and the related chapters there.

Gives you a good understanding of the two platforms and the "equivalence".

Also check out Simon Guest's articles at www.simonguest.com

Simon Guest is an authority on .NET and J2EE interoperability and explains the concepts very well. His book has a chapter which does a similar comparison of the two platforms.

There is no seperate application server in the Windows world - rather the app server is a routing to the application runtime done by the web server (IIS) itself.

Regards

Pandurang
--
blog: pandurang.thinkingMS.com
Jul 21 '05 #3

P: n/a
Hi Cowboy

Check out: http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en...asp?frame=true and the related chapters there.

Gives you a good understanding of the two platforms and the "equivalence".

Also check out Simon Guest's articles at www.simonguest.com

Simon Guest is an authority on .NET and J2EE interoperability and explains the concepts very well. His book has a chapter which does a similar comparison of the two platforms.

There is no seperate application server in the Windows world - rather the app server is a routing to the application runtime done by the web server (IIS) itself.

Regards

Pandurang
--
blog: pandurang.thinkingMS.com
Jul 21 '05 #4

P: n/a
Hi Cowboy

Check out: http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en...asp?frame=true and the related chapters there.

Gives you a good understanding of the two platforms and the "equivalence".

Also check out Simon Guest's articles at www.simonguest.com

Simon Guest is an authority on .NET and J2EE interoperability and explains the concepts very well. His book has a chapter which does a similar comparison of the two platforms.

There is no seperate application server in the Windows world - rather the app server is a routing to the application runtime done by the web server (IIS) itself.

Regards

Pandurang
--
blog: pandurang.thinkingMS.com
--
blog: pandurang.thinkingMS.com
"Cowboy (Gregory A. Beamer) [MVP]" wrote:
The JSP would be ASPX, essentially, with some difference in the byte compile
and coding methodology.

There is no direct EJB equivalent. You would most likely end up with a
combination of Framework components and custom classes, in your solution.

JDBC and ADO.NET - sort of. But JDBC is, technically, a bit more focused on
the connectivity, much like ODBC. You can use ODBC with ADO.NET, and it is
possible to do the same with JDBC. But, many Java developers call more than
the data conn stack JDBC, so ADO .NET could be an equivalent, if that is the
case. The portion of ADO.NET that sits in the client namepaces, like
SqlClient and OracleClient is technically closer to JDBC, but there are
still some differences.

Much of what you are looking at in Java are Frameworks built on top of the
language. The Framework direction for Sun and Microsoft are widely
different.

--
Gregory A. Beamer
MVP; MCP: +I, SE, SD, DBA

************************************************
Think Outside the Box!
************************************************
"Frank Rachel" <fr*****@navisys.com> wrote in message
news:%2******************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
So I can focus on the correct areas of research, I was wondering if

someone
could give me the .NET equivelents for this J2EE architecture:

JSP's make calls to local JavaBean Controls. The controls do a JNDI lookup
to invoke methods on EJB's. The EJB's use local Java classes, and these
classes use JDBC to do database work.

Example:

Login.jsp contains "import xxx.LoginControl", and invokes the "login"
method.
LoginControl.login does a JNDI lookup for "LoginWorker", which is an EJB.

It
invokes the "login" method of the EJB
LoginWorker.login does some stuff, and eventually calls
LoginDataSource.login, which uses JDBC to talk to the database.

What would be the appropriate areas of .NET to concentrate on? (JSP->ASPX,
EJB->?, JDBC->ADO?)

Whats the equivalent of the "Application Server" (WebSphere/etc)?

Thanks.


Jul 21 '05 #5

P: n/a
Hi Cowboy

Check out: http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en...asp?frame=true and the related chapters there.

Gives you a good understanding of the two platforms and the "equivalence".

Also check out Simon Guest's articles at www.simonguest.com

Simon Guest is an authority on .NET and J2EE interoperability and explains the concepts very well. His book has a chapter which does a similar comparison of the two platforms.

There is no seperate application server in the Windows world - rather the app server is a routing to the application runtime done by the web server (IIS) itself.

Regards

Pandurang
--
blog: pandurang.thinkingMS.com
Jul 21 '05 #6

P: n/a
Hi Frank

Check out: http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en...asp?frame=true and the related chapters there.

Gives you a good understanding of the two platforms and the "equivalence".

Also check out Simon Guest's articles at www.simonguest.com

Simon Guest is an authority on .NET and J2EE interoperability and explains the concepts very well. His book has a chapter which does a similar comparison of the two platforms.

There is no seperate application server in the Windows world - rather the app server is a routing to the application runtime done by the web server (IIS) itself.

Regards

Pandurang
--
blog: pandurang.thinkingMS.com
Jul 21 '05 #7

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.