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Object Browser

P: n/a
Ot
When I use the Object Browser in the IDE to look at the functionality
provided in References, I see lovely entries headed Summary, Parameters
and/or Return Values.

If I develop a COM application and wish to make entries so that users of my
application can see those headers, how do I do that?

I am writing in VB.NET Standard.
Jul 21 '05 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
this is automatically done with all .Net types that you write, however if you want Summary, Parameters, Return Values, etc you will need to write your classes/types in C#, and then annotate your classes/methods with the XML Documentation feature of C# (http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...ntutorial.asp). there are some 3rd party add ons to implement similar functionality in VB, however i am not sure if this information will show up in the object browser. future versions of VB are slated to have the XML Documentation feature

ht
jayson
Jul 21 '05 #2

P: n/a
also, you will not be able to develop class libraries ("COM" apps, though in .Net we don't refer to components as COM, they are simply class libraries, or assemblies) with vb.net standard, you will need to upgrade to professional, enterprise, or architect for this

jayson
Jul 21 '05 #3

P: n/a
Ot
Actually, I am developing them with Standard by using a Macro I found.

http://www.planet-source-code.com/vb...=517&lngWId=10

It allows Standard to change the type of the project to "Library."
"Jayson" <an*******@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:01**********************************@microsof t.com...
also, you will not be able to develop class libraries ("COM" apps, though in .Net we don't refer to components as COM, they are simply class
libraries, or assemblies) with vb.net standard, you will need to upgrade to
professional, enterprise, or architect for this.
jayson

Jul 21 '05 #4

P: n/a
Ot
On the other hand, although I think I have developed a class library
properly, maybe I haven't. When I attempt to include a reference to that
class library A which appears in the IDE when I click the COM tab after
selecting add reference, I get an error:

<quote>
A reference to 'A' could not be added. Converting that type library to a
..NET assembly failed. Type library A was exported from a CLR assembly and
cannot be re-imported as a CLR assembly.
</quote>

I am at a loss to understand what it is trying to tell me. If the stuff in
the DLL created is CLR (isn't that Common Language Runtime?) then shouldn't
a second project be able to reference the DLL by including it as a
reference?

"Ot" <ur***@tds.invalid (use net)> wrote in message
news:eN**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Actually, I am developing them with Standard by using a Macro I found.

http://www.planet-source-code.com/vb...=517&lngWId=10
It allows Standard to change the type of the project to "Library."
"Jayson" <an*******@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:01**********************************@microsof t.com...
also, you will not be able to develop class libraries ("COM" apps,
though in .Net we don't refer to components as COM, they are simply class
libraries, or assemblies) with vb.net standard, you will need to upgrade to professional, enterprise, or architect for this.

jayson


Jul 21 '05 #5

P: n/a
Cor
Hi Ot,

I would ask this in the vb.language group, Armin knows this kind of things
always exactly.
(And for not getting an F1, xx,xxx,xx, tell that someone told this)

Cor
Jul 21 '05 #6

P: n/a
Ot wrote:
When I use the Object Browser in the IDE to look at the functionality
provided in References, I see lovely entries headed Summary, Parameters
and/or Return Values.

If I develop a COM application and wish to make entries so that users of my
application can see those headers, how do I do that?

I am writing in VB.NET Standard.


Did you ever find an answer to this question? I would like to do the same.
Using VB.Net 2003

tia,
gm
Jul 21 '05 #7

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