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If not .Net then what?

jim
In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and Xenocode,
it was pointed out that there may be better programming languages/IDEs to
use for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps.

My goal is to create desktop applications for use on Windows XP+ OSs that
are distributed as single executables that do not require traditional
install packages to run.

I would like to use a drag and drop UI development tool like the .Net IDE
(or the old VB6) to make development as easy as possible. I am a hobbyist
programmer and would like to put out some useful apps, but I don't want to
have to become an expert at a complex language like C++ to do so reliably.

More than one person responding to the previous thread held the opinion that
..Net was great for corporate environments where all PCs are strictly
regulated, but may not be the best option to develop the type of apps that I
would like to develop for the PC community at large.

So what, in your opinion, would be a good alternative to use to develop the
type of applications that I am trying to develop?

jim
Dec 28 '07 #1
184 7144
jim wrote:
In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and Xenocode,
it was pointed out that there may be better programming languages/IDEs to
use for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps.

My goal is to create desktop applications for use on Windows XP+ OSs that
are distributed as single executables that do not require traditional
install packages to run.

I would like to use a drag and drop UI development tool like the .Net IDE
(or the old VB6) to make development as easy as possible. I am a hobbyist
programmer and would like to put out some useful apps, but I don't want to
have to become an expert at a complex language like C++ to do so reliably.

More than one person responding to the previous thread held the opinion that
.Net was great for corporate environments where all PCs are strictly
regulated, but may not be the best option to develop the type of apps that I
would like to develop for the PC community at large.

So what, in your opinion, would be a good alternative to use to develop the
type of applications that I am trying to develop?
I think you should stick to C# (or VB.NET if you so prefer). Just
consider not targeting the latest and greatest .NET version.

Since Win2003 Windows does come with .NET preinstalled and it
is pushed out to Windows XP via Windows Update.

I believe you can even distribute the runtime with your app.

Unless your app specifically targets users with old Windows
version and/or slow dialup internet connections, then I can not
see a problem going with .NET !

Arne
Dec 28 '07 #2
The .NET framework should be installed on every Windows XP machine that is
kept updated. That means you don't have to create an installer package. You
can distribute the executable alone and it should work fine. Vista machines
have the .NET framework pre-installed.

The only objection to the .NET framework I've heard is from people who say
they don't want some big runtime library installed on their pc's. But what
do they think Windows itself is? It's a big runtime library that every
windows application ever written requires to run. The .NET framework is just
a few extra DLL's in the System32 directory.

I use primarily use VB for all my development. Every now & then some dummy
will email me and with "why don't you write a version of this program that
doesn't require the .NET framework?" And I'll respond with "why don't you
write it yourself?"

I use VB not because i'm stupid, but because I'm lazy. I like that I can
whip out a windows form in a few seconds and use the various built-in
functions and classes to do the work that I want done. I've been known to
get a quick app done in 15 minutes when someone says "I need a utility to do
this...". Using a non-ide language like gcc or other command-line compilers
doesn't make any sense to me. It's a time waster.

If I need to make a program that works without the .NET framework (one
that'll run on a BartPE bootable CD, for example) then I use BCX. But to
design the form, I use VB6 to create the .frm file, and use a program I
wrote to convert the .frm file into the BCX code needed to create the form
at runtime.

So it's up to you. Use whatever you're comfortable with and don't listen to
people who have pre-conceived ideas about your language of choice.

"jim" <ji*@home.netwr ote in message
news:Oz******** ***********@big news7.bellsouth .net...
In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and Xenocode,
it was pointed out that there may be better programming languages/IDEs to
use for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps.

My goal is to create desktop applications for use on Windows XP+ OSs that
are distributed as single executables that do not require traditional
install packages to run.

I would like to use a drag and drop UI development tool like the .Net IDE
(or the old VB6) to make development as easy as possible. I am a hobbyist
programmer and would like to put out some useful apps, but I don't want to
have to become an expert at a complex language like C++ to do so reliably.

More than one person responding to the previous thread held the opinion
that .Net was great for corporate environments where all PCs are strictly
regulated, but may not be the best option to develop the type of apps that
I would like to develop for the PC community at large.

So what, in your opinion, would be a good alternative to use to develop
the type of applications that I am trying to develop?

jim

Dec 28 '07 #3
[followups set to comp.programmin g, where I'm reading this thread]

Terry Olsen said:

<snip>
The only objection to the .NET framework I've heard is from people who
say they don't want some big runtime library installed on their pc's.
Another objection is that it's slow. The first program I moved to .Net ran
around 60 times slower than native - way too slow to be useful.

A third objection is that it's non-portable. Even if I were of a mind to
run .Net programs under Linux, I couldn't actually do so - at least, not
yet. Mono promises to sort that out... oonnee ddaayy...... but in the
meantime Linux users would rather have something that actually works.

<snip>
I use VB not because i'm stupid, but because I'm lazy.
Being even lazier than you, I use C++ Builder for those rare occasions when
I need to write a Windows program. Because I'm so lazy, though, I prefer
to use Linux, where almost everything is so much easier to do. (In the
interests of balance and fairness, I will of course concede that there are
some things that it's easier to do in Windows. But industrial-strength
programming isn't one of them.)
I like that I can
whip out a windows form in a few seconds and use the various built-in
functions and classes to do the work that I want done. I've been known to
get a quick app done in 15 minutes when someone says "I need a utility to
do this...".
What took you? My personal record for responding to such a request is 30
seconds (including compilation) for the first version, and another 60
seconds when the user suddenly decided to require some extra features.
Builder rocks like that. I recommend it to you - and it doesn't need that
silly .Net framework either.
Using a non-ide language like gcc or other command-line
compilers doesn't make any sense to me. It's a time waster.
I don't like wasting my time, which is why I use the best tool for the job.
Sometimes, that's an IDE tool like C++ Builder. But sometimes it's a
command-line tool. If you think command line compilers are a waste of
time, that suggests that you haven't much experience of life outside the
world of pointy-clicky.

<snip>
So it's up to you. Use whatever you're comfortable with and don't listen
to people who have pre-conceived ideas about your language of choice.
There, at least, I can agree with you.

--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk >
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Dec 28 '07 #4
Jim,

Honestly the application that you want to develop is from the previous
millennium from the time that Dos was reigning.

Now user's wants (while they tell that they do not), all kind of advanced
behaviour. That needs a lot of extra software for which the Net framework
is, it seems to me, the best solution today. You alone cannot create all the
classes which help us to make software today. The runtime of that software
(however not only that runtime, there is much more) is now in the Net
assemblies.

Another advance from Net related software is that it is easy to deploy
because the real application can be relative small because most people have
already the .Net versions and a Windows OS on their computer. The advance
from the Net versions is that it is undependable from the Windows OS that is
running. However not small as not any OS part is (and every runtime for
windows is).

Be aware that there never were really small applications that could run on
windows OS systems. An average VB6 was by instance much huger to deploy and
absolute not deployable with dialup connections. In past every (non
assembler type) program language had its own runtime even when big parts
were included in the OS (like in mainframes)

If you don't know why runtimes are build: First they appeared to overcome
every time repeated simple instructions as adding, which can be, without a
runtime, need real a lot of instructions, while in fact it is endless times
done in a program. This can be used of course for everything and is every
time done more.

I hope that this explains something to you.

Cor
Dec 28 '07 #5
Hi Jim,
More than one person responding to the previous thread held the opinion
that .Net was great for corporate environments where all PCs are strictly
regulated, but may not be the best option to develop the type of apps that
I would like to develop for the PC community at large.
that kind of opinion is often offered by people jealously guarding their
'corporate' pond and perks it offers. No matter what environment you are
developing for what matters is the quality and usefulness of your program.
It is much easier to conceal lousy workmanship in a corporate environment
where expressing an honest opinion may cost dearly.
I would like to use a drag and drop UI development tool like the .Net IDE
(or the old VB6) to make development as easy as possible.
Just don't it expect to think for you.
In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and Xenocode,
it was pointed out that there may be better programming languages/IDEs to
use for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps.
I never used Thininstall. Xenocode allows wrapping the whole application -
executables, Dlls, ActiveX, databases, INI or XML, plus, when necessary,
the whole .NET Framework, into a single executable. This executable can also
wrap registry entries. You can simply copy such an executable onto the hard
drive of the target machine without the traditional setup. This is
especially handy when the application includes an ActiveX that normally
would require registration on the target machine. I word of caution - if you
do it as hobby, it may cost you some money, besides the time and effort.

Michael

"jim" <ji*@home.netwr ote in message
news:Oz******** ***********@big news7.bellsouth .net...
In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and Xenocode,
it was pointed out that there may be better programming languages/IDEs to
use for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps.

My goal is to create desktop applications for use on Windows XP+ OSs that
are distributed as single executables that do not require traditional
install packages to run.

I would like to use a drag and drop UI development tool like the .Net IDE
(or the old VB6) to make development as easy as possible. I am a hobbyist
programmer and would like to put out some useful apps, but I don't want to
have to become an expert at a complex language like C++ to do so reliably.

More than one person responding to the previous thread held the opinion
that .Net was great for corporate environments where all PCs are strictly
regulated, but may not be the best option to develop the type of apps that
I would like to develop for the PC community at large.

So what, in your opinion, would be a good alternative to use to develop
the type of applications that I am trying to develop?

jim

Dec 28 '07 #6
In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and Xenocode, it
was pointed out that there may be better programming languages/IDEs to use
for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps.
Delphi 7 (newer versions are not as stable) does that very well.

--
Michael
----
http://michael.moreno.free.fr/
http://port.cogolin.free.fr/
Dec 28 '07 #7
Hi Jim,
>for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps
No application is standalone, every application has at least
an reference to the kernel dll and maybe to advapi, gdi, netapi
or user api. The only standalone application you can say is a real
standalone application would be a BIOS Code, Bootloader,
oskernel and code working in that space,...

..NET Framework is just fine, some additional dlls and a little
pe modification for such a great framework is more than acceptable!

Regards

Kerem

--
-----------------------
Beste Grüsse / Best regards / Votre bien devoue
Kerem Gümrükcü
Microsoft Live Space: http://kerem-g.spaces.live.com/
Latest Open-Source Projects: http://entwicklung.junetz.de
-----------------------
"This reply is provided as is, without warranty express or implied."
Dec 28 '07 #8
jim
Thanks!

I've seen Delphi pop up a lot in these conversations, but I was kind of
afraid that it may not be that reliable since Borland couldn't make a go of
it.

I'd hate to begin using a language/IDE and have the company supporting it go
under. It would just waste a lot of time that I could have spent learning
something else.

jim

"Michael Moreno" <My************ *******@free.fr wrote in message
news:mn******** *************** @free.fr...
>In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and
Xenocode, it was pointed out that there may be better programming
languages/IDEs to use for the purpose of creating standalone, single
executable apps.

Delphi 7 (newer versions are not as stable) does that very well.

--
Michael
----
http://michael.moreno.free.fr/
http://port.cogolin.free.fr/


Dec 28 '07 #9
Hi,
You can always use C++ and write unmanaged apps, if you only use win32 API
you know for sure that it will run always.


"jim" <ji*@home.netwr ote in message
news:Oz******** ***********@big news7.bellsouth .net...
In a thread about wrapping .Net applications using Thinstall and Xenocode,
it was pointed out that there may be better programming languages/IDEs to
use for the purpose of creating standalone, single executable apps.

My goal is to create desktop applications for use on Windows XP+ OSs that
are distributed as single executables that do not require traditional
install packages to run.

I would like to use a drag and drop UI development tool like the .Net IDE
(or the old VB6) to make development as easy as possible. I am a hobbyist
programmer and would like to put out some useful apps, but I don't want to
have to become an expert at a complex language like C++ to do so reliably.

More than one person responding to the previous thread held the opinion
that .Net was great for corporate environments where all PCs are strictly
regulated, but may not be the best option to develop the type of apps that
I would like to develop for the PC community at large.

So what, in your opinion, would be a good alternative to use to develop
the type of applications that I am trying to develop?

jim

--
Ignacio Machin
http://www.laceupsolutions.com
Mobile & warehouse Solutions.
Dec 28 '07 #10

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