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VS2005 major development bug

After spending more than a day reducing a complicated compiler bug to a
simple case I reported it to the MSDN Product Feedback Center as a bug
just now. However this bug is completely stymying my development of a
VC++ component. Does Microsoft still offer any free bug reporting cases
for VS2005, as they did two for VS2003 so that I can talk with a
technical representative directly to try to find a workaround for the
compiler bug ?

While I would be normally willing to wait for a response from the bug
report, the magnitude of the bug in my code, where the compiler is
either producing wrong code or the vtable is being destroyed at run-time
by the CLR system, is such that I am dead in the water until the bug is
addressed. While I can continue searching for a workaround for the bug,
for instance by switching from Managed C++ to C++/CLI and see if that
causes any change so that the bug does not occur, if there is none I can
find I must give up creating my code entirely. Therefore I am hoping
that there is some way of addressing the problem directly with Microsoft
without having to pay them directly just to fix their own bad code.
Apr 21 '06 #1
16 1744
Edward Diener wrote:
After spending more than a day reducing a complicated compiler bug to
a simple case I reported it to the MSDN Product Feedback Center as a
bug just now. However this bug is completely stymying my development
of a VC++ component. Does Microsoft still offer any free bug
reporting cases for VS2005, as they did two for VS2003 so that I can
talk with a technical representative directly to try to find a
workaround for the compiler bug ?

While I would be normally willing to wait for a response from the bug
report, the magnitude of the bug in my code, where the compiler is
either producing wrong code or the vtable is being destroyed at
run-time by the CLR system, is such that I am dead in the water until
the bug is addressed. While I can continue searching for a workaround
for the bug, for instance by switching from Managed C++ to C++/CLI
and see if that causes any change so that the bug does not occur, if
there is none I can find I must give up creating my code entirely.
Therefore I am hoping that there is some way of addressing the
problem directly with Microsoft without having to pay them directly
just to fix their own bad code.


There's normally no charge for a support incident that's due to a bug in the
product. You may have to pay for a support incident to get things rolling,
but my understanding is that if it's confirmed to be due to a bug, they'll
credit the charge back to you. If you're blocked from proceeding, you
should contact PSS - that's the only way you'll get a hotfix to a current
product. Reporting the bug through the feedback center may get it fixed in
the next release of VC++, but it won't help you in the short term.

If there's a small repro case (it sounds like you did develop one) that you
could post here, perhaps someone can help find a workaround. I'm assuming
that your feedback FDBK48932 is the bug in question - if you could post the
files to the newgroup then we all could take a look.

-cd
Apr 21 '06 #2
Edward Diener wrote:
Carl Daniel [VC++ MVP] wrote:
Edward Diener wrote:
After spending more than a day reducing a complicated compiler bug
to
a simple case I reported it to the MSDN Product Feedback Center as a
bug just now. However this bug is completely stymying my development
of a VC++ component. Does Microsoft still offer any free bug
reporting cases for VS2005, as they did two for VS2003 so that I can
talk with a technical representative directly to try to find a
workaround for the compiler bug ?

While I would be normally willing to wait for a response from the
bug report, the magnitude of the bug in my code, where the compiler
is
either producing wrong code or the vtable is being destroyed at
run-time by the CLR system, is such that I am dead in the water
until
the bug is addressed. While I can continue searching for a
workaround
for the bug, for instance by switching from Managed C++ to C++/CLI
and see if that causes any change so that the bug does not occur, if
there is none I can find I must give up creating my code entirely.
Therefore I am hoping that there is some way of addressing the
problem directly with Microsoft without having to pay them directly
just to fix their own bad code.
There's normally no charge for a support incident that's due to a
bug in the product. You may have to pay for a support incident to
get things rolling, but my understanding is that if it's confirmed
to be due to a bug, they'll credit the charge back to you. If
you're blocked from proceeding, you should contact PSS - that's the
only way you'll get a hotfix to a current product.


I see a number of 1-800-936-5800. Is that the PSS number ? I recall
calling for a number of incidents which were all VC++ bugs for VS2003
.NET but do not remember if that was the number I called. I will
probably wait a little while to see if the bug can at least be
confirmed before going the telephone route as paying Microsoft $245
for my
possible mistake will not be easy on my pocketbook.


Go to http://msdn.microsoft.com/support/, click on "Contact Microsoft" and
find the phone number for your country.
Reporting the bug through the feedback center may get it fixed in
the next release of VC++, but it won't help you in the short term.
I am hoping it will get me a workaround which is not to taxing on me
<g>.

If there's a small repro case (it sounds like you did develop one)
that you could post here, perhaps someone can help find a
workaround. I'm assuming that your feedback FDBK48932 is the bug in
question - if you could post the files to the newgroup then we all
could take a look.


I have attached the zip file to this reply which illustrates the bug
in question. I see that I had incorrectly not attached the zip file
to the FDBK48932 report and have now done so. If I am not supposed to
attach a .zip file here to this reply, please tell me which NG I
should use. The explanation for duplicating the bug is on the
FDBK48932 report.

If the bug is my own in some way I will be glad to acknowledge it. I
did spend a great deal of time reducing a very complex case, step by
step,
to try to illustrate the bug in about its simplest format.


Thanks for the repro. I don't have time to look at it this morning, but
I'll spend some time on it this evening.

Thanks for your reply.


You're welcome.

-cd
Apr 21 '06 #3
Edward Diener wrote:
After spending more than a day reducing a complicated compiler bug to a
simple case I reported it to the MSDN Product Feedback Center as a bug
just now.
Which Bug, haven't found one in your example only an access exception ?
Change

private:

File: ValidationEdit. h
Line: 34

into

public:
Then recompile your sample try to run it.
Then retry to run your original sample and look which exception is thrown:

----->>>>>>> System.FieldAcc essException
To get detailed information by the compiler define your "pimpl" class
outside the form. As I interpret the pimpl idiom, I would implement it
in a CPP.
[...]

I hope I haven't again misinterpreted your posts again ......... you
remember ...... ? Or done something wrong ?
If I have not misinterpreted your sample, have you another one ?
Andre
Apr 21 '06 #4
Andre Kaufmann wrote:
Edward Diener wrote:
After spending more than a day reducing a complicated compiler bug to
a simple case I reported it to the MSDN Product Feedback Center as a
bug just now.
Which Bug, haven't found one in your example only an access exception ?


When and where ? Did you follow the instructions I gave in my bug report
? If you follow my bug report, when you step into the debugger and try
to trace into "pimpl -> InitializeValid ator();", which is line number 46
of ValidationEdit. cpp, you will see in the Disassembly window that it
does not go to that routine but somewhere off of the WndProc routine
instead. This od course causes an exception which is shown in the design
window of the TestValidation project.


Change

private:

File: ValidationEdit. h
Line: 34

into

public:
Line 34 in ValiditionEdit. h is a comment.

/// Required designer variable.


Then recompile your sample try to run it.
Then retry to run your original sample and look which exception is thrown:

----->>>>>>> System.FieldAcc essException
No other exception is thrown when I run my code in the debugger except
in the design window specified. It is possible I do not have exception
handling turned on in the debugger but I do not see debugger setting(s)
which controls this. In Tools | Options | Debugging | General is there
an option which controls whether or not an exception is picked up by the
debugger ? Most of my options there are checked.


To get detailed information by the compiler define your "pimpl" class
outside the form. As I interpret the pimpl idiom, I would implement it
in a CPP.
Please do not tell me how to program. The pimpl class is a nested class
of my ref class so that it can access all of the members of my ref class
when it is passed a ref class pointer. In the simple example this is not
an issue but in the more common coding of mixed mode C++ programming
in .NET, this is an easy way for a C++ native class to share code with
its ref class. If it were not a nested class it could only access the
public members of my corresponding ref class when passed a pointer to
that ref class.

I notice that in C++/CLI it is no longer allowed for a native C++ class
to be a nested class of a ref class. Oh brother !!! How does a native
C++ class which contains a good part of the actual functionality of a
ref class now get to call and access protected and private members of
its corresponding ref class in C++/CLI ?
> [...]

I hope I haven't again misinterpreted your posts again ......... you
remember ...... ? Or done something wrong ?


I am not getting the exception you mentioned. Your line number is
incorrect. I know how to program and don't need to be told how to use
the pimpl idiom. Other than that I do very much appreciate your help.
Apr 21 '06 #5
Carl Daniel [VC++ MVP] wrote:
Edward Diener wrote:
Carl Daniel [VC++ MVP] wrote:
Edward Diener wrote:
After spending more than a day reducing a complicated compiler bug
to
a simple case I reported it to the MSDN Product Feedback Center as a
bug just now. However this bug is completely stymying my development
of a VC++ component. Does Microsoft still offer any free bug
reporting cases for VS2005, as they did two for VS2003 so that I can
talk with a technical representative directly to try to find a
workaround for the compiler bug ?

While I would be normally willing to wait for a response from the
bug report, the magnitude of the bug in my code, where the compiler
is
either producing wrong code or the vtable is being destroyed at
run-time by the CLR system, is such that I am dead in the water
until
the bug is addressed. While I can continue searching for a
workaround
for the bug, for instance by switching from Managed C++ to C++/CLI
and see if that causes any change so that the bug does not occur, if
there is none I can find I must give up creating my code entirely.
Therefore I am hoping that there is some way of addressing the
problem directly with Microsoft without having to pay them directly
just to fix their own bad code.
There's normally no charge for a support incident that's due to a
bug in the product. You may have to pay for a support incident to
get things rolling, but my understanding is that if it's confirmed
to be due to a bug, they'll credit the charge back to you. If
you're blocked from proceeding, you should contact PSS - that's the
only way you'll get a hotfix to a current product.

I see a number of 1-800-936-5800. Is that the PSS number ? I recall
calling for a number of incidents which were all VC++ bugs for VS2003
.NET but do not remember if that was the number I called. I will
probably wait a little while to see if the bug can at least be
confirmed before going the telephone route as paying Microsoft $245
for my
possible mistake will not be easy on my pocketbook.


Go to http://msdn.microsoft.com/support/, click on "Contact Microsoft" and
find the phone number for your country.
Reporting the bug through the feedback center may get it fixed in
the next release of VC++, but it won't help you in the short term.

I am hoping it will get me a workaround which is not to taxing on me
<g>.
If there's a small repro case (it sounds like you did develop one)
that you could post here, perhaps someone can help find a
workaround. I'm assuming that your feedback FDBK48932 is the bug in
question - if you could post the files to the newgroup then we all
could take a look.

I have attached the zip file to this reply which illustrates the bug
in question. I see that I had incorrectly not attached the zip file
to the FDBK48932 report and have now done so. If I am not supposed to
attach a .zip file here to this reply, please tell me which NG I
should use. The explanation for duplicating the bug is on the
FDBK48932 report.

If the bug is my own in some way I will be glad to acknowledge it. I
did spend a great deal of time reducing a very complex case, step by
step,
to try to illustrate the bug in about its simplest format.


Thanks for the repro. I don't have time to look at it this morning, but
I'll spend some time on it this evening.


I have confirmed that, after converting my simple example to an
equivalent C++/CLI sample, everything works perfectly. So this is
clearly a bug somewhere in the Managed C++ code. I had hoped to get my
Managed C++ components to first work under VS2005 and .NET 2.0 before
starting to convert the code to C++/CLI. In my actual code there are
quite a number of far more complicated .NET components than my simple
example shows, as you can imagine, so the best thing to do is just to
work to convert them over. Eventually I will have to do it anyhow so I
might as well just start immediately. Dealing with a Managed C++ bug
such as I have found is just too much of a time waster and I hope, since
C++/CLI is clearly VC++'s future .NET language, I will not run into such
a bad issue again.
Apr 22 '06 #6
Edward Diener wrote:
Andre Kaufmann wrote:
Edward Diener wrote:
After spending more than a day reducing a complicated compiler bug to
a simple case I reported it to the MSDN Product Feedback Center as a
bug just now.
Which Bug, haven't found one in your example only an access exception ?


When and where ? Did you follow the instructions I gave in my bug report


I simply compiled your sample you've attached to a post in this thread
and it crashed.
? If you follow my bug report, when you step into the debugger and try
to trace into "pimpl -> InitializeValid ator();", which is line number 46
of ValidationEdit. cpp, you will see in the Disassembly window that it
does not go to that routine but somewhere off of the WndProc routine
instead. This od course causes an exception which is shown in the design
window of the TestValidation project.
Exactly. I haven't debugged the sample into depth, but as I would
interpret it the .NET runtime checks if the embedded class has access to
the outer class, ValidationEdit and as it's forbidden to access private
members from another class (friend declaration don't work also), it
simply throws a security exception.

[...]
----->>>>>>> System.FieldAcc essException


No other exception is thrown when I run my code in the debugger except


Your application (attached to your newsgroup post) crashs, with a
failure report stating that an uncaught system access exception has been
thrown. It won't throw that exception if you make the class


To get detailed information by the compiler define your "pimpl" class
outside the form. As I interpret the pimpl idiom, I would implement it
in a CPP.
Please do not tell me how to program. The pimpl class is a nested class
of my ref class so that it can access all of the members of my ref class


I only mentioned that IMHO a nested class is not the pimpl idiom I read
about in Lakos book, but may be that there are different "pimpl" idioms.
You may name the variable so, but may be somewhat confusing.

I notice that in C++/CLI it is no longer allowed for a native C++ class
It seems that this is also true (now ?) for managed cpp. Don't know if
the compiler should rather throw a compile time error instead of runtime
error.

The sample will also run if you don't access the member variable
initializing directly, but use a public member method:

rClass->IsInitializing ()

to be a nested class of a ref class. Oh brother !!! How does a native
C++ class which contains a good part of the actual functionality of a
ref class now get to call and access protected and private members of
its corresponding ref class in C++/CLI ?
> [...]

I hope I haven't again misinterpreted your posts again ......... you
remember ...... ? Or done something wrong ?


I am not getting the exception you mentioned. Your line number is
incorrect.


Sorry, must have been moved downwards, because I edited the code
somewhat, checking the access restrictions.

the lines are:

32 private:
33 /// <summary>
34 /// Required designer variable.
35 /// </summary>

If you temporarily change line 32 into public the sample doesn't crash,
at least on my computer / my IDE.
I know how to program and don't need to be told how to use
the pimpl idiom. Other than that I do very much appreciate your help.


You have blamed me not knowing C++ very well too, some months ago.
I'll forget about that from now on, but I couldn't resist to make some
notes about pimpl in my previous post.

And you are using still managed CPP, although you have made such a bad
experience about it, regarding the loader lock. It hasn't directly
something to do with managed CPP itself, but wouldn't it be better to
port to C++/CLI ? Regarding the crash in your sample, C++/CLI seems to
throw a compile time error, while managed cpp silently compiles, but
seems to have the same restrictions (at runtime), as C++/CLI.
As I interpret the problem, the compiler should rather throw a compile
time error, instead of throwing an exception at runtime. So you should
perhaps change your bug report in this regard.

Andre
Apr 22 '06 #7
Andre Kaufmann wrote:
Edward Diener wrote:
Andre Kaufmann wrote:
Edward Diener wrote:
After spending more than a day reducing a complicated compiler bug
to a simple case I reported it to the MSDN Product Feedback Center
as a bug just now.

Which Bug, haven't found one in your example only an access exception ?
When and where ? Did you follow the instructions I gave in my bug report


I simply compiled your sample you've attached to a post in this thread
and it crashed.


If you had used the project which was in the .zip file you would have
seen that it was compiled with Managed C++ and not C++/CLI, and that it
compiles fine.
? If you follow my bug report, when you step into the debugger and try
to trace into "pimpl -> InitializeValid ator();", which is line number
46 of ValidationEdit. cpp, you will see in the Disassembly window that
it does not go to that routine but somewhere off of the WndProc
routine instead. This od course causes an exception which is shown in
the design window of the TestValidation project.
Exactly. I haven't debugged the sample into depth, but as I would
interpret it the .NET runtime checks if the embedded class has access to
the outer class, ValidationEdit and as it's forbidden to access private
members from another class (friend declaration don't work also), it
simply throws a security exception.


No in Managed C++.

[...]
----->>>>>>> System.FieldAcc essException
No other exception is thrown when I run my code in the debugger except


Your application (attached to your newsgroup post) crashs, with a
failure report stating that an uncaught system access exception has been
thrown. It won't throw that exception if you make the class


To get detailed information by the compiler define your "pimpl" class
outside the form. As I interpret the pimpl idiom, I would implement
it in a CPP.


Please do not tell me how to program. The pimpl class is a nested
class of my ref class so that it can access all of the members of my
ref class
>


I only mentioned that IMHO a nested class is not the pimpl idiom I read
about in Lakos book, but may be that there are different "pimpl" idioms.
You may name the variable so, but may be somewhat confusing.


In normal C++ programming a pimpl class does not have to be a nested
class because one can use the 'friend' declaration to allow the pimpl
class to access all of the members of the other class if necessary.
Because C++ .NET does not allow 'friend', the solution to this in
Managed C++ was to make the pimpl class a nested class of the ref class
and pass a pointer of the ref class to the pimpl class. However even the
ability to have a pimpl nested native class of a ref class has been
taken away in C++/CLI. That is not progress but regress. See my other
post and the only solution I have found for this.

I notice that in C++/CLI it is no longer allowed for a native C++ class
It seems that this is also true (now ?) for managed cpp. Don't know if
the compiler should rather throw a compile time error instead of runtime
error.

The sample will also run if you don't access the member variable
initializing directly, but use a public member method:

rClass->IsInitializing ()


While I appreciate your workarounds, my actual code is far more
complicated than my simple sample and the point of posting my bug was to
have someone else ascertain that the bug actually exists on their
machine also. This you did not do because you did not use the
solutions/projects in my zip file. Instead you created your own
solutions/projects, added my source file, then told me what you found.
That is not the way to test someone else's bug.

to be a nested class of a ref class. Oh brother !!! How does a native
C++ class which contains a good part of the actual functionality of a
ref class now get to call and access protected and private members of
its corresponding ref class in C++/CLI ?

> [...]
I hope I haven't again misinterpreted your posts again ......... you
remember ...... ? Or done something wrong ?


I am not getting the exception you mentioned. Your line number is
incorrect.


Sorry, must have been moved downwards, because I edited the code
somewhat, checking the access restrictions.

the lines are:

32 private:
33 /// <summary>
34 /// Required designer variable.
35 /// </summary>

If you temporarily change line 32 into public the sample doesn't crash,
at least on my computer / my IDE.
I know how to program and don't need to be told how to use the pimpl
idiom. Other than that I do very much appreciate your help.


You have blamed me not knowing C++ very well too, some months ago.
I'll forget about that from now on, but I couldn't resist to make some
notes about pimpl in my previous post.

And you are using still managed CPP, although you have made such a bad
experience about it, regarding the loader lock. It hasn't directly
something to do with managed CPP itself, but wouldn't it be better to
port to C++/CLI ? Regarding the crash in your sample, C++/CLI seems to
throw a compile time error, while managed cpp silently compiles, but
seems to have the same restrictions (at runtime), as C++/CLI.


I am using Managed C++ because I had a ton of mixed-mode code I
developed for VS2003 in C++, but never ran because of the loader-lock
bug, and I first wanted to move that code to VS2005 and try to build and
run it.

However because of this bug, and the assumption that MS will not be too
interested in fixing bugs in Managed C++ code generation, I am forced to
change my code to use C++/CLI immediately. Changing my sample to use
C++/CLI I see that everything works perfectly.

For me this bug is the final chapter of the Managed C++ fiasco,
including the destructive loader-lock bug in VS2003, other bugs I
reported to MS regarding Managed C++ and VS2003, and now this horrendous
bug with Managed C++ and VS2005. All in all a hideous example of
computer programming by the VC++ team.

I am moving to C++/CLI and hopefully my efforts to use .NET programming
with C++ will now be much better. It could not be worse than it is has
been with Managed C++. I am truly sorry for Microsoft having put out
such bad technology as Managed C++. They are usually a company that does
not make such mistakes.
Apr 22 '06 #8
Hi Edward!
For me this bug is the final chapter of the Managed C++ fiasco,


I agree... I also know of other (small) bugs in /clr:oldsyntax.. .

But I am also happy that the new syntax is simpler and hopefully
durable... but I also now need to move about 3000 lines of code to
C++/CLI... ;-(

--
Greetings
Jochen

My blog about Win32 and .NET
http://blog.kalmbachnet.de/
Apr 22 '06 #9
Edward Diener wrote:
Andre Kaufmann wrote:

I simply compiled your sample you've attached to a post in this thread
and it crashed.
If you had used the project which was in the .zip file you would have
seen that it was compiled with Managed C++ and not C++/CLI, and that it
compiles fine.


The DEBUG configuration compiles fine and then crashs after it is
started. Where did I wrote something about C++/CLI ? Crashing during
compilation would mean then compiler to throw an ICE, but that's surely
not the case.

Exactly. I haven't debugged the sample into depth, but as I would
interpret it the .NET runtime checks if the embedded class has access
to the outer class, ValidationEdit and as it's forbidden to access
private members from another class (friend declaration don't work
also), it simply throws a security exception.


No in Managed C++.


Yes in managed C++ it compiles rewritten in C++/CLI it compiles not.
That is the main problem. When the managed version is run and the native
object tries to access a private method of the managed object the
runtime throws an System.FieldAcc essException.

In normal C++ programming a pimpl class does not have to be a nested
No problem with that.
class because one can use the 'friend' declaration to allow the pimpl
class to access all of the members of the other class if necessary.
I just wondered why you defined the class members in the header. Pimpl,
is commonly used or is designed to decouple objects.
Therefore the class is only declared in the header.

public __gc class ValidationEdit : ......
{
..........
__nogc class ValidationEditP impl;
};

And defined in the CPP unit. But I don't want to be pedantic and this
has nothing to do with the problem / bug we are discussing in this
thread about.
Because C++ .NET does not allow 'friend', the solution to this in
Managed C++ was to make the pimpl class a nested class of the ref class
and pass a pointer of the ref class to the pimpl class. However even the
ability to have a pimpl nested native class of a ref class has been
taken away in C++/CLI.
And it has been taken away for managed C++ too. Except that it compiles,
but throws a runtime error. While in C++/CLI the compiler, as you wrote,
will throw an error at compilation time.
That is not progress but regress.
It seems that this has nothing to do with C++/CLI itself. But rather
with the code generation / runtime itself. There must have been some
security reasons for this change.
See my other
post and the only solution I have found for this.

While I appreciate your workarounds, my actual code is far more
complicated than my simple sample and the point of posting my bug was to
have someone else ascertain that the bug actually exists on their
machine also. This you did not do because you did not use the
solutions/projects in my zip file.
I did.
Instead you created your own
solutions/projects, added my source file, then told me what you found.
That is not the way to test someone else's bug.
I have not, why should I do so ? You are making assumptions, which you
have in another discussion accused me (always) to do so.

So:

Take your example posted in this newsgroup. Make all private variables
in class ValidationEdit public, as I already wrote, by changing a single
line of code:

File: ValidationEdit. h
Line: 32

private:
/// <summary>
/// Required designer variable.
/// </summary>
System::Compone ntModel::Contai ner* components;

into:

public:
/// <summary>
/// Required designer variable.
/// </summary>
System::Compone ntModel::Contai ner* components;
Then recompile your control and test it. I did no >>>> other <<<<
changes to your project and I used your project configuration.

I am using Managed C++ because I had a ton of mixed-mode code I
developed for VS2003 in C++, but never ran because of the loader-lock
bug, and I first wanted to move that code to VS2005 and try to build and
run it.

However because of this bug, and the assumption that MS will not be too
interested in fixing bugs in Managed C++ code generation,
IMHO they cannot fix it, because it's a runtime restriction. They could
however throw an error at compilation time.
I am forced to
change my code to use C++/CLI immediately.
IMHO it would be the same in managed C++ if you change your code. But
anyways directly porting to C++/CLI is the better way to go.
Changing my sample to use
C++/CLI I see that everything works perfectly.

For me this bug is the final chapter of the Managed C++ fiasco,
including the destructive loader-lock bug in VS2003, other bugs I
reported to MS regarding Managed C++ and VS2003, and now this horrendous
bug with Managed C++ and VS2005.
The bug is, that the compiler doesn't throw an error at compilation
time. A nested class seems not to be allowed anymore to access private
members of a managed class. This is true for C++/CLI as it's true for
managed C++.
[...]


Andre
Apr 23 '06 #10

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1328
by: Noozer | last post by:
Just visited the Visual Studio 2005 page on MS's MSDN site. I didn't see a mention of a release date. Any idea when we can expect to have a "for production" version available? Also, about VB2005 Express... Can this be used to build and distribute stand alone applications? I really like the idea of having the stand alone development packages (VB, SQL, WebDev) instead of one monothilic development package. Of course I remember when...
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by: Jeff Gaines | last post by:
I have just installed VS 2005 (MSDN version) and I am having problems coping files to the Projects folder while VS2005 is running. The projects folder is on a network share and I have used mscorfg.msc to set permissions as follows: Machine | Code Groups | All_Code | LocalIntranetZone | Copy of DataShare file://\\Jgsvr\DataShare\*.
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by: Rob Dob | last post by:
VS2005 is a PIECE of Garbage and is bug Ridden, I wonder how many others feel the same, I am so sorry that I have moved away from VS2003, VS2005 is unstable, and half the stuff doesn't work, Microsft has spent so much time trying to make it simply that when you try to do something useful with it it doesn't work... Half the time it crashes, and menu items appear for things you cannot do. For example, Go into component designer, ...
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2001
by: GaryDean | last post by:
(my original post was inaccurate but this post accurately describes what I think is a very bad vs2005 bug) short description... Deleting a dataset and recreating it from the dataadapter causes VS.Net 2005 to render the associated .resx and .vb file inoperative. detail... I converted an asp 1.1 vb.net app using the vs2005 conversion wizard and then retested the app after conversion.
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by: musosdev | last post by:
Hi guys I'm trying to migrate to VS2005... I've managed to do that, but realised I'd opened my web projects as file projects, and I'm getting the error about network BIOS command limit. Anyway, I decided to have a go at loading them as web projects from our Win2k3 server. It gets so far and then says "The web server does not appear to have FrontPage server extensions installed".
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by: Ronald S. Cook | last post by:
I have been asked to write a ..NET Windows app using the 1.1 framework. I have both 1.1 and 2.0 on my PC. When I create a new project in Visual Studio 2005, it shows initial namespaces under references (System, System.Data) all of which are version 2.0. How can I tell my project to use only the 1.1 framework? Thanks, Ron
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by: Squishy | last post by:
I tried installing my VS2005 Pro on Vista Ultimate 32 bit RTM today and got errors stating that VS2005 was not compatible with Vista. Microsoft......please pull your finger out of my ass and tell me this is a joke. It must be a joke....because I also have read that VS2002 and VS2003 will not be supported on Vista. This clearly violates Microsoft's own terms of support for these products.
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by: Peter Bradley | last post by:
Hi all, This post is sort of tangentially related to my earlier posts on configuration files for DLLs. Does anyone know how to create typed DataSets using VS2005's new DataSet designer, but with the ability to configure the connection string via a config file? The designer seems to hard-code the connection string into the dataset itself, which just can't be right.
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marktang
by: marktang | last post by:
ONU (Optical Network Unit) is one of the key components for providing high-speed Internet services. Its primary function is to act as an endpoint device located at the user's premises. However, people are often confused as to whether an ONU can Work As a Router. In this blog post, we’ll explore What is ONU, What Is Router, ONU & Router’s main usage, and What is the difference between ONU and Router. Let’s take a closer look ! Part I. Meaning of...
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by: Hystou | last post by:
Most computers default to English, but sometimes we require a different language, especially when relocating. Forgot to request a specific language before your computer shipped? No problem! You can effortlessly switch the default language on Windows 10 without reinstalling. I'll walk you through it. First, let's disable language synchronization. With a Microsoft account, language settings sync across devices. To prevent any complications,...
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Oralloy
by: Oralloy | last post by:
Hello folks, I am unable to find appropriate documentation on the type promotion of bit-fields when using the generalised comparison operator "<=>". The problem is that using the GNU compilers, it seems that the internal comparison operator "<=>" tries to promote arguments from unsigned to signed. This is as boiled down as I can make it. Here is my compilation command: g++-12 -std=c++20 -Wnarrowing bit_field.cpp Here is the code in...
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by: Hystou | last post by:
Overview: Windows 11 and 10 have less user interface control over operating system update behaviour than previous versions of Windows. In Windows 11 and 10, there is no way to turn off the Windows Update option using the Control Panel or Settings app; it automatically checks for updates and installs any it finds, whether you like it or not. For most users, this new feature is actually very convenient. If you want to control the update process,...
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isladogs
by: isladogs | last post by:
The next Access Europe User Group meeting will be on Wednesday 1 May 2024 starting at 18:00 UK time (6PM UTC+1) and finishing by 19:30 (7.30PM). In this session, we are pleased to welcome a new presenter, Adolph Dupré who will be discussing some powerful techniques for using class modules. He will explain when you may want to use classes instead of User Defined Types (UDT). For example, to manage the data in unbound forms. Adolph will...
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by: conductexam | last post by:
I have .net C# application in which I am extracting data from word file and save it in database particularly. To store word all data as it is I am converting the whole word file firstly in HTML and then checking html paragraph one by one. At the time of converting from word file to html my equations which are in the word document file was convert into image. Globals.ThisAddIn.Application.ActiveDocument.Select();...
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by: adsilva | last post by:
A Windows Forms form does not have the event Unload, like VB6. What one acts like?
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by: 6302768590 | last post by:
Hai team i want code for transfer the data from one system to another through IP address by using C# our system has to for every 5mins then we have to update the data what the data is updated we have to send another system
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bsmnconsultancy
by: bsmnconsultancy | last post by:
In today's digital era, a well-designed website is crucial for businesses looking to succeed. Whether you're a small business owner or a large corporation in Toronto, having a strong online presence can significantly impact your brand's success. BSMN Consultancy, a leader in Website Development in Toronto offers valuable insights into creating effective websites that not only look great but also perform exceptionally well. In this comprehensive...

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