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Relationships for cascading tables

P: 4
Hi
I am new to database design. I am building a database to handle the paperwork for boat companies maintenance. I have made a series of tables using foreign keys to interlock the tables. I think ive done it wrong as i have relationships from the first table to all subsequent tables. See pic. Is it enough to just link one table to the next without all these extra relationships?
Regards
Russ
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Jul 13 '19 #1

✓ answered by twinnyfo

Russ,

It depends. Based upon your relationships, it says that your Vessels, Equipment, Tasks and Task Done all have a company associated with them. This is not "inherently" incorrect, as this may be true. But, typically, we don't associate a company with a Task or a Task Done.

By the way, are you working in MS Access or MySQL? I'm happy to move this thread to MS Access if so. Being new to DB design, it might be quite a leap to jump directly into MySQL, but stranger things have happened....

Sounds like there may be more structurally unsound in your DB than just how many other tables one table is related to. You may want to review this article on Database Normalization first before you continue.

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twinnyfo
Expert Mod 2.5K+
P: 3,284
Russ,

It depends. Based upon your relationships, it says that your Vessels, Equipment, Tasks and Task Done all have a company associated with them. This is not "inherently" incorrect, as this may be true. But, typically, we don't associate a company with a Task or a Task Done.

By the way, are you working in MS Access or MySQL? I'm happy to move this thread to MS Access if so. Being new to DB design, it might be quite a leap to jump directly into MySQL, but stranger things have happened....

Sounds like there may be more structurally unsound in your DB than just how many other tables one table is related to. You may want to review this article on Database Normalization first before you continue.
Jul 15 '19 #2

P: 4
Thanks, Twinny and yes I'm learning them both. I need to use MySQL because I want it to be web-based, so people can enter and retrieve data via their own devices. The company is included so I could alow separate businesses to use it, but restrict data based on a company login. I am using access to test my tables as its easier to build forms and querys there for me at this stage. I am then creating a similar set up in MySQL. I have cleaned up some of the excess fields in my second DB.
Russ
Jul 16 '19 #3

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