471,090 Members | 1,343 Online
Bytes | Software Development & Data Engineering Community
Post +

Home Posts Topics Members FAQ

Join Bytes to post your question to a community of 471,090 software developers and data experts.

Database Error

One of my MySQL databases has 7 tables in it. By far the largest table had
nearly 300,000 records in it, but each record was quite small and the
overall file size for the table's .MYD file was only about 18MB. It is
running on a Windows 2000 server and the drive is NTFS.

This morning when I went to do a daily backup, I noticed that the table was
down to only 1000 odd records, of which 973 were fresh records. But,
curiously, the first 64 records are actually from the birth of the table, 6
weeks ago.The really strange this is, the records IDs in mysql should jump
by about 280,000 between the first 64 records and the last 973, but they
don't. The IDs don't skip out any at all.

So, it looks like the whole table was wiped and it started a fresh
overnight. None of the other tables were harmed at all.

There are several server applications which access the database, but none of
them ever delete anything from the database, and only a few people have
access to the database at all.

Are there any known bugs that would wipe a table under the circumstances
described above?

Thank you for your time,
Gareth.

Jul 19 '05 #1
2 1600
"Gareth" <ga****@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:<bn**********@sparta.btinternet.com>...
One of my MySQL databases has 7 tables in it. By far the largest table had
nearly 300,000 records in it, but each record was quite small and the
overall file size for the table's .MYD file was only about 18MB. It is
running on a Windows 2000 server and the drive is NTFS.

This morning when I went to do a daily backup, I noticed that the table was
down to only 1000 odd records, of which 973 were fresh records. But,
curiously, the first 64 records are actually from the birth of the table, 6
weeks ago.The really strange this is, the records IDs in mysql should jump
by about 280,000 between the first 64 records and the last 973, but they
don't. The IDs don't skip out any at all.

So, it looks like the whole table was wiped and it started a fresh
overnight. None of the other tables were harmed at all.

There are several server applications which access the database, but none of
them ever delete anything from the database, and only a few people have
access to the database at all.

Are there any known bugs that would wipe a table under the circumstances
described above?


Well, are you using replication on that server?

Did you remove all perms and set up proper security using GRANTS? If
that's not the case that anyone with a little bit of knowledge about
where your database is, valid user names and a password, etc can do
anything with your data... Or even your own app! I tend to be pretty
paranoiac and crazy about GRANTS but the fun thing is that I never had
bad surprises... and it saved my day a few times when my own programs
attempted to delete data inadvertantly...

Anyone else has acces to that database/server?

Anyother script that might have run and caused that?
Jul 19 '05 #2
"Gareth" <ga****@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:<bn**********@sparta.btinternet.com>...
One of my MySQL databases has 7 tables in it. By far the largest table had
nearly 300,000 records in it, but each record was quite small and the
overall file size for the table's .MYD file was only about 18MB. It is
running on a Windows 2000 server and the drive is NTFS.

This morning when I went to do a daily backup, I noticed that the table was
down to only 1000 odd records, of which 973 were fresh records. But,
curiously, the first 64 records are actually from the birth of the table, 6
weeks ago.The really strange this is, the records IDs in mysql should jump
by about 280,000 between the first 64 records and the last 973, but they
don't. The IDs don't skip out any at all.

So, it looks like the whole table was wiped and it started a fresh
overnight. None of the other tables were harmed at all.

There are several server applications which access the database, but none of
them ever delete anything from the database, and only a few people have
access to the database at all.

Are there any known bugs that would wipe a table under the circumstances
described above?


Well, are you using replication on that server?

Did you remove all perms and set up proper security using GRANTS? If
that's not the case that anyone with a little bit of knowledge about
where your database is, valid user names and a password, etc can do
anything with your data... Or even your own app! I tend to be pretty
paranoiac and crazy about GRANTS but the fun thing is that I never had
bad surprises... and it saved my day a few times when my own programs
attempted to delete data inadvertantly...

Anyone else has acces to that database/server?

Anyother script that might have run and caused that?
Jul 19 '05 #3

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.

Similar topics

16 posts views Thread by John | last post: by
1 post views Thread by pintur | last post: by
9 posts views Thread by Wayne Smith | last post: by
reply views Thread by Jonathan Wood | last post: by
9 posts views Thread by Jerim79 | last post: by
12 posts views Thread by Steve | last post: by
2 posts views Thread by Scott Jones | last post: by

By using Bytes.com and it's services, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

To disable or enable advertisements and analytics tracking please visit the manage ads & tracking page.