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oracle - mysql comparison

hey all,

I realize that this question might pop up from time to time, but I
haven't seen it a while and things might of changed, so -

Right now (July 2004) how does mysql stand up in comparison to oracle?
We are seriously considering migrating our multi-processor oracle
system to mysql to save on licensing costs, and would need several
features that mysql may or may not have:

- replication
- archive logging
- interoperabilit y with oracle/database links with oracle
- PL/SQL type language/stored procedures
- roles
- oracle migration scripts/conversion
- embedded java API
- partitioning/tablespace assignment
- import/export tools
- equivalent oracle datatypes
- multi-processor support
- performance (relatively equivalent or better)

In addition, have any oracle DBAs out there gone through the
conversion process between mysql and oracle? If so, what were the
gotchas/catches that you went through? What are features that are
there that you like or feel are missing? I apologize in advance for
the cross-post, but I did want to get as wide a range of opinion as
possible..

Thanks much,

jon
Jul 20 '05 #1
133 8916
jonathan wrote:
hey all,

I realize that this question might pop up from time to time, but I
haven't seen it a while and things might of changed, so -

Right now (July 2004) how does mysql stand up in comparison to oracle?
We are seriously considering migrating our multi-processor oracle
system to mysql to save on licensing costs, and would need several
features that mysql may or may not have:

- replication
- archive logging
- interoperabilit y with oracle/database links with oracle
- PL/SQL type language/stored procedures
- roles
- oracle migration scripts/conversion
- embedded java API
- partitioning/tablespace assignment
- import/export tools
- equivalent oracle datatypes
- multi-processor support
- performance (relatively equivalent or better)

In addition, have any oracle DBAs out there gone through the
conversion process between mysql and oracle? If so, what were the
gotchas/catches that you went through? What are features that are
there that you like or feel are missing? I apologize in advance for
the cross-post, but I did want to get as wide a range of opinion as
possible..

Thanks much,

jon


No comparison and you have missed the most important questions you
should be concerned about unless you are running a hotdog stand.

1. Where to we call for support if there is a problem we can't solve?
2. How do we recover transactions that occur between the last backup
and the time when the system fails?
3. Can we recover from object and/or file corruption?

Very simply ... ask your management what the cost is to the company
for every hour the system is unavailable. Then compare that to the
less than $800 cost for licensing Oracle SE1.

But if you truly need EE capabilities such as partitioning then stick
with Oracle. You won't find it anywhere else.

Daniel Morgan

Jul 20 '05 #2
Try a google search "mysql comparison oracle" or similar.

Obviously oracle has financial resources to devote to enhancements
that mysql doesn't but it's amazing to see how far along mysql has
evolved over the last several versions.
Jul 20 '05 #3
Daniel Morgan <da******@x.was hington.edu> wrote in message news:<108933544 2.28909@yasure> ...
jonathan wrote:
hey all,

I realize that this question might pop up from time to time, but I
haven't seen it a while and things might of changed, so -

Right now (July 2004) how does mysql stand up in comparison to oracle?
We are seriously considering migrating our multi-processor oracle
system to mysql to save on licensing costs, and would need several
features that mysql may or may not have:

- replication
- archive logging
- interoperabilit y with oracle/database links with oracle
- PL/SQL type language/stored procedures
- roles
- oracle migration scripts/conversion
- embedded java API
- partitioning/tablespace assignment
- import/export tools
- equivalent oracle datatypes
- multi-processor support
- performance (relatively equivalent or better)

In addition, have any oracle DBAs out there gone through the
conversion process between mysql and oracle? If so, what were the
gotchas/catches that you went through? What are features that are
there that you like or feel are missing? I apologize in advance for
the cross-post, but I did want to get as wide a range of opinion as
possible..

Thanks much,

jon
No comparison and you have missed the most important questions you
should be concerned about unless you are running a hotdog stand.

1. Where to we call for support if there is a problem we can't solve?


mysql.com

Being open source product doesn't mean "not supported". You can buy
support contract.
2. How do we recover transactions that occur between the last backup
and the time when the system fails?
There is limited crush recovery.
3. Can we recover from object and/or file corruption?

Very simply ... ask your management what the cost is to the company
for every hour the system is unavailable. Then compare that to the
less than $800 cost for licensing Oracle SE1.

But if you truly need EE capabilities such as partitioning then stick
with Oracle. You won't find it anywhere else.

Daniel Morgan

Jul 20 '05 #4
tt*******@yahoo .com (jonathan) wrote in message news:<f0******* *************** ****@posting.go ogle.com>...
hey all,

I realize that this question might pop up from time to time, but I
haven't seen it a while and things might of changed, so -

Take a good look at http://www.mysql.com
Right now (July 2004) how does mysql stand up in comparison to oracle?
We are seriously considering migrating our multi-processor oracle
system to mysql to save on licensing costs, and would need several
features that mysql may or may not have:

- replication
Limited (comparing to Oracle).
- archive logging
No
- interoperabilit y with oracle/database links with oracle
Not sure. Nothing supported by Oracle. Maybe some 3rd party tools.
- PL/SQL type language/stored procedures
Very limited SQL stored functions and procedures (ANSI 2003?), like in DB2.
- roles
- oracle migration scripts/conversion
Not sure it's possible. Like with any other databases, you'd need a lot
of manual work.
- embedded java API
No
- partitioning/tablespace assignment
Tablespaces. No partitioned tables in Oracle sense (limited partitioning
for clusters).
- import/export tools
- equivalent oracle datatypes
Not exactly. Lots of C-type datatypes, no good support for VARCHAR yet.
- multi-processor support
Yes.
- performance (relatively equivalent or better)

You wouldn't know till you try... Everybody likes performance of MySQL
with non-transactional tables, but I wouldn't base serious applications
on them...
In addition, have any oracle DBAs out there gone through the
conversion process between mysql and oracle? If so, what were the
gotchas/catches that you went through? What are features that are
there that you like or feel are missing? I apologize in advance for
the cross-post, but I did want to get as wide a range of opinion as
possible..

Thanks much,

jon

Jul 20 '05 #5
Alex Filonov wrote:

No comparison and you have missed the most important questions you
should be concerned about unless you are running a hotdog stand.

1. Where to we call for support if there is a problem we can't solve?

mysql.com


Not exactly the same thing as opening a Level 1 TAR.
Being open source product doesn't mean "not supported". You can buy
support contract.


True. But being available 7x24 and able to support you in the way
Oracle support does requires paying money: And lots of it.
2. How do we recover transactions that occur between the last backup
and the time when the system fails?


There is limited crush recovery.


Compared with Oracle ... very limited. And it is the issues related
to Murphy's Law that are most important to consider.
3. Can we recover from object and/or file corruption?

Very simply ... ask your management what the cost is to the company
for every hour the system is unavailable. Then compare that to the
less than $800 cost for licensing Oracle SE1.

But if you truly need EE capabilities such as partitioning then stick
with Oracle. You won't find it anywhere else.

Daniel Morgan


Daniel Morgan

Jul 20 '05 #6
Daniel Morgan <da******@x.was hington.edu> wrote in message news:<108941332 0.371216@yasure >...
1. Where to we call for support if there is a problem we can't solve?

mysql.com


Not exactly the same thing as opening a Level 1 TAR.


However, quite similar comparing to usual processing of a Level 2
iTAR. Sorry couldn't resist. :-)

--
Dusan Bolek
http://www.db-support.com

Email: sp*****@seznam. cz
Pls add "Not Guilty" to the subject, otherwise your email will face an
unpleasant end as SPAM.
Jul 20 '05 #7
jo********@home .com (Joel Garry) wrote in message news:<91******* *************** ****@posting.go ogle.com>...
af******@yahoo. com (Alex Filonov) wrote in message news:<33******* *************** ****@posting.go ogle.com>...
Daniel Morgan <da******@x.was hington.edu> wrote in message news:<108941332 0.371216@yasure >...
Alex Filonov wrote:

>>
>>No comparison and you have missed the most important questions you
>>should be concerned about unless you are running a hotdog stand.
>>
>>1. Where to we call for support if there is a problem we can't solve?
>
>
> mysql.com

Not exactly the same thing as opening a Level 1 TAR.

I don't know all details of MySQL support, but I think you can get pretty
good support, including phone hotline, for the price comparable with the
price of Oracle support.
> Being open source product doesn't mean "not supported". You can buy
> support contract.

True. But being available 7x24 and able to support you in the way
Oracle support does requires paying money: And lots of it.


Sure. Oracle support is not cheap either.
>>2. How do we recover transactions that occur between the last backup
>> and the time when the system fails?
>
> There is limited crush recovery.

Compared with Oracle ... very limited. And it is the issues related
to Murphy's Law that are most important to consider.


Judging by industy experience (Yahoo! and Google are both using MySQL
on a big scale), things aren't that bad...


They are if you care about transactions and consistency. Yahoo and


This sarcasm is obsolete. MySQL has pretty decent transactional support.
As for consistency (I suppose you mean read-only), it's implemented in
ProgreSQL, another Open Source DB engine. BTW, other commercial RMBDS
(DB2, MSSQL) don't have read-only consistency and sell pretty well at that.
Google don't have to. <sarcasm> If you miss a web page here or there,
so what? Lose a sale in the middle, who cares, the customer will call
if he's unhappy, soon enough. Mailing lists? Blame it all on spam
filters.</sarcasm>


Well, commercial companies are using the tool successfully, making tons
of money. We can grump whatever we want (I'd be happy to see everybody
using Oracle), but the tool is a commercial success.

Myself, I wouldn't recommend MySQL for critical applications as yet.
But things are moving pretty fast in the Open Source world...


Once you build that handbasket, Hell isn't far.

jg

Jul 20 '05 #8
VC
Hello,

Please see in-line:

"Alex Filonov" <af******@yahoo .com> wrote in message
news:33******** *************** ***@posting.goo gle.com...
As for consistency (I suppose you mean read-only), it's implemented in
ProgreSQL, another Open Source DB engine. BTW, other commercial RMBDS
(DB2, MSSQL) don't have read-only consistency and sell pretty well at

that.

Please define 'read-only consistency' and elaborate a bit on why DB2 and
MSSQL don't have it.

Thanks.

VC
Jul 20 '05 #9
Daniel Morgan <da******@x.was hington.edu> wrote in message news:<108941332 0.371216@yasure >...
Alex Filonov wrote:

No comparison and you have missed the most important questions you
should be concerned about unless you are running a hotdog stand.

1. Where to we call for support if there is a problem we can't solve?

mysql.com


Not exactly the same thing as opening a Level 1 TAR.


I don't know all details of MySQL support, but I think you can get pretty
good support, including phone hotline, for the price comparable with the
price of Oracle support.
Being open source product doesn't mean "not supported". You can buy
support contract.


True. But being available 7x24 and able to support you in the way
Oracle support does requires paying money: And lots of it.


Sure. Oracle support is not cheap either.
2. How do we recover transactions that occur between the last backup
and the time when the system fails?


There is limited crush recovery.


Compared with Oracle ... very limited. And it is the issues related
to Murphy's Law that are most important to consider.


Judging by industy experience (Yahoo! and Google are both using MySQL
on a big scale), things aren't that bad...

Myself, I wouldn't recommend MySQL for critical applications as yet.
But things are moving pretty fast in the Open Source world...
3. Can we recover from object and/or file corruption?

Very simply ... ask your management what the cost is to the company
for every hour the system is unavailable. Then compare that to the
less than $800 cost for licensing Oracle SE1.

But if you truly need EE capabilities such as partitioning then stick
with Oracle. You won't find it anywhere else.

Daniel Morgan


Daniel Morgan

Jul 20 '05 #10

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