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C# - Windows Mobile 5.0/6.0 Programming - Setting Alarm Clock

Heya,

I can't seem to find any references to a way that I can set the system alarm clock.

I am using a Motorola Q which is running Windows Mobile 5.0 Smartphone.

I am not sure if the best way to do this woudl be directly through a microsoft.windowsmobile class or maybe directly through maybe like just altering the registry somewhere (I have tried to locate the alarm time in registry and cannot find it either).

I basically want to be able to press a button and change the alarm time.

Any help would be appreciated!!

Scott
Jan 2 '08 #1
8 16598
RedSon
5,000 Expert 4TB
Heya,

I can't seem to find any references to a way that I can set the system alarm clock.

I am using a Motorola Q which is running Windows Mobile 5.0 Smartphone.

I am not sure if the best way to do this woudl be directly through a microsoft.windowsmobile class or maybe directly through maybe like just altering the registry somewhere (I have tried to locate the alarm time in registry and cannot find it either).

I basically want to be able to press a button and change the alarm time.

Any help would be appreciated!!

Scott
Alarm times are not a function of the OS or registry. Alarm applications allow the user to enter in a time in the future then when the system time matches the user inputed future time then they make an alarm. You won't find any Microsoft WM5 APIs or Registry entries for alarms.
Jan 2 '08 #2
I understand, however, there are simple applications on the net such as "EzAlarm" that do exactly what I want to do. Have a simple GUI that changes the actual System Alarm time--so there is definitely a way without writing your own alarm application

Anyone? ;)
Jan 3 '08 #3
RedSon
5,000 Expert 4TB
I understand, however, there are simple applications on the net such as "EzAlarm" that do exactly what I want to do. Have a simple GUI that changes the actual System Alarm time--so there is definitely a way without writing your own alarm application

Anyone? ;)
There is no such thing as "System Alarm time" I don't know what you are talking about. That application EzAlarm allows the user to enter in a time and when the system time is equal to or greater then the user entered time it makes a noise or vibrates or something. The OS does not keep track of alarms, it does not have an "alarm time" there is no such thing as an alarm to the OS, it has system time. Do I need to repeat that again? I'll bold it this time... There is no such thing as System Alarm time.
Jan 3 '08 #4
NeoPa
32,182 Expert Mod 16PB
HamBones,

Your basic premise would simply point to there being an application written to handle this. I see no reason to conclude (as you have done) that there is necessarily some sort of standard API that supports it.
In short - there is definitely a way if you write it into the application. I see nothing to support the contention that it must have been done with prepackaged assistance.
Jan 3 '08 #5
markmcgookin
648 Expert 512MB
HamBones,

Your basic premise would simply point to there being an application written to handle this. I see no reason to conclude (as you have done) that there is necessarily some sort of standard API that supports it.
In short - there is definitely a way if you write it into the application. I see nothing to support the contention that it must have been done with prepackaged assistance.
I have never heard of anyone tapping into a system.windows etc ... clock API.

a simple app that had a thread triggering an event every second comparing the current time to the user time seems the only way.
Jan 4 '08 #6
I hate to bump something so old, but I was searching for the same thing -- How to modify the system alarm through the registry. Despite how ridiculous you may have thought this person's post to be, there is in fact a system alarm. HKLM/Software/Microsoft/Clock/[0-2] is where it is. 0 and 1 are set via the alarm interface, whereas 2 can only be set manually via the registry.If anyone knows how, I'd be glad to hear it -- I've had to resort to setting 1 via the menu, then copying it to 2, then changing 1 back to what I want it to be.
Sep 28 '09 #7
NeoPa
32,182 Expert Mod 16PB
@NeoPa
Just to clarify my point earlier. I made no contention that such a thing was impossible, simply that the logic put forward was wholly unsupportable.

Bumping a thread with new information should never be considered a problem though, as far as I can see. If you have helpful new information then sharing it is to the benefit of all.

As for the Registry Key you mention (HKLM/Software/Microsoft/Clock/[0-2]), I find no Clock path under HKLM\Software\Microsoft on my PC. While no particular build could really be considered standard (except perhaps a virgin one), I would certainly infer that as my PC doesn't have this key then it must not be a standard OS key (That, and it's under HKLM\Software).

If anything, this seems to support the contention that the functionality is provided within a standard software package, rather than being an inbuilt facility provided by Windows.

Welcome to Bytes!
Sep 28 '09 #8
RedSon
5,000 Expert 4TB
@nemosomen
Dont feel bad bumping something. Just dont bump it if you don't have anything useful to add.

As for the registry key you are talking about, there is no information on it for alarms. The settings in that key allow you to show notification dialogs for daylight or standard time, they also allow you to enable automatic daylight savings switch-over.

There is some other anecdotal evidence that you can change the value of that key to disable the ability to change the date and time, but employees of Microsoft have denied that this is true.

The only information I could find regarding system alarms is the Clock Configuration Service Provider but it uses XML to provision the clock and alarm system. Usually this is done via OMA Client Provisioning (what used to be WAP Provisioning) and is controlled by your mobile carrier. This means that it has to be allowed by the security roles defined by the mobile operators.

You should study up on this and it's related tasks and concepts: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb737261.aspx
Sep 29 '09 #9

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