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Beginners book

P: n/a
Hi,
I want to start learning Javascript. Can anyone please recommend a good
book for a beginner.Thanks
Jul 20 '05 #1
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7 Replies


P: n/a
JRS: In article <r1********************************@4ax.com>, seen in
news:comp.lang.javascript, Cyberdog <da**********@INVALID.com> posted at
Tue, 9 Dec 2003 14:30:33 :-
I want to start learning Javascript. Can anyone please recommend a good
book for a beginner.Thanks


Read the FAQ, posted every Wednesday.

--
John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ??*@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v4.00 MIME.
Web <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> - FAQish topics, acronyms, & links.
Check boilerplate spelling -- error is a public sign of incompetence.
Never fully trust an article from a poster who gives no full real name.
Jul 20 '05 #2

P: n/a
Cyberdog wrote:
I want to start learning Javascript. Can anyone please recommend a good
book for a beginner.Thanks


See the FAQ and the newsgroup.
PointedEars, who never required a JavaScript *book*
Jul 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
On Tue, 09 Dec 2003 14:30:33 +0000, Cyberdog <da**********@INVALID.com>
wrote:
Hi,
I want to start learning Javascript. Can anyone please recommend a good
book for a beginner.Thanks

Thanks for the help.
Jul 20 '05 #4

P: n/a

"Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn" <Po*********@web.de> wrote in message
news:3F**************@PointedEars.de...
Cyberdog wrote:
I want to start learning Javascript. Can anyone please recommend a good
book for a beginner.Thanks


See the FAQ and the newsgroup.
PointedEars, who never required a JavaScript *book*


Not many people _require_ a book for javascript, but having a reference on
your desk is a heck of a lot better than online references, in my opinion.
Javascript is an easy language, but I easily forget some syntax... I get it
confused with the many other languages and interfaces I use on a daily
basis.

Though PointedEars makes it seem like a JavaScript book is not necessary...
I recommend having one around if you are going to do a lot of JS
programming...

I really like the JavaScript Bible, which has an _excelent_ DOM and JS
reference... light on the how-to, heavy on the details.

Brian
Jul 20 '05 #5

P: n/a
Brian wrote:
"Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn" <Po*********@web.de> wrote in message
news:3F**************@PointedEars.de...
Please shorten your attribution, no one needs the message ID of the
posting you are replying to because it is already in the headers of
your postings and the message ID of your posting is in the headers
of the postings of the people who reply to yours. Additionally,
that hyperfluous information makes your attribution more than one
line which makes following a discussion with some quoting levels
worse (if all people would do what you do.)

Besides, enable your automatic linebreak function and set it to max.
80 characters per line (72 to 76 is recommended). Anything else is
against Internet/Usenet standards.

You will then encounter the problem, that your client software
not only line-breaks quotes but actually breaks them. There are
OE-Tools and OE-Quotefix who help you avoiding that.

Or you could just switch to a client software not so badly flawed,
there are plenty of them out there.

Now you only need to fix that e-mail address fake (if that would
have been correct, I would have mailed you the above instead of
posting off-topic): <http://www.interhack.net/pubs/munging-harmful/>

Then your postings are at least *technically* correct and will
therefore be read by me in the future until further notice.
Cyberdog wrote:
I want to start learning Javascript. Can anyone please recommend
a good book for a beginner.Thanks


See the FAQ and the newsgroup.

PointedEars, who never required a JavaScript *book*


Not many people _require_ a book for javascript, but having a
reference on your desk is a heck of a lot better than online
references, in my opinion.


Well, you simply misread me.

*Emphasizing* the word `book' was intentional. I do not recommend
against using references, instead I recommend to use them where you
can and before you ask. However, I do recommend against JavaScript
*books* because most of them are badly written (containing outdated
or simply wrong information) and the book(s?) that are left (you see,
there is only *one* of the hundreds of books out there mentioned in
the FAQ that obviously can be recommended) then both require more time
on the average to find what you are looking for, and they become easily
outdated anyway.

I understand that people who are used to books would prefer such.
Advantages and disadvantages of those must be weighed properly, though.
Though PointedEars makes it seem like a JavaScript book is not
necessary... I recommend having one around if you are going to do a
lot of JS programming...


If you do (a lot of) JavaScript programming(, like me), you are in
front of the screen anyway and have your Web browser running all the
time. Using your browser and clicking links in index documents is
faster and easier that search the index of a book and turn to the
specified page. If you then care for costs of being online like me,
install and configure a local webserver (which has become quite easy
to do these days, and you would be glad to have such a software for
testing purposes, too) and download the specifications.

I will always prefer my http://localhost/js/ (local copy of the
JavaScript 1.5 Guide) and sorts above *any* JavaScript book.
PointedEars
Jul 20 '05 #6

P: n/a
(Canceled my other followup, consider it obsolete.)

Brian wrote:
"Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn" <Po*********@web.de> wrote in message
news:3F**************@PointedEars.de...
Please shorten your attribution, no one needs the message ID of the
posting you are replying to because it is already in the headers of
your postings and the message ID of your posting is in the headers
of the postings of the people who reply to yours. Additionally,
that hyperfluous information makes your attribution more than one
line which makes following a discussion with some quoting levels
worse (if all people would do what you do.)

Now you only need to fix that e-mail address fake (if that would
have been correct, I would have mailed you the above instead of
posting off-topic): <http://www.interhack.net/pubs/munging-harmful/>

Then your postings are at least *technically* correct and will
therefore be read by me in the future until further notice.
Cyberdog wrote:
I want to start learning Javascript. Can anyone please recommend
a good book for a beginner.Thanks


See the FAQ and the newsgroup.

PointedEars, who never required a JavaScript *book*


Not many people _require_ a book for javascript, but having a
reference on your desk is a heck of a lot better than online
references, in my opinion.


Well, you simply misread me.

*Emphasizing* the word `book' was intentional. I do not recommend
against using references, instead I recommend to use them where you
can and before you ask. However, I do recommend against JavaScript
*books* because most of them are badly written (containing outdated
or simply wrong information) and the book(s?) that are left (you see,
there is only *one* of the hundreds of books out there mentioned in
the FAQ that obviously can be recommended) then both require more time
on the average to find what you are looking for, and they become easily
outdated anyway.

I understand that people who are used to books would prefer such.
Advantages and disadvantages of those must be weighed properly, though.
Though PointedEars makes it seem like a JavaScript book is not
necessary... I recommend having one around if you are going to do a
lot of JS programming...


If you do (a lot of) JavaScript programming(, like me), you are in
front of the screen anyway and have your Web browser running all the
time. Using your browser and clicking links in index documents is
faster and easier that search the index of a book and turn to the
specified page. If you then care for costs of being online like me,
install and configure a local webserver (which has become quite easy
to do these days, and you would be glad to have such a software for
testing purposes, too) and download the specifications.

I will always prefer my http://localhost/js/ (local copy of the
JavaScript 1.5 Guide) and sorts above *any* JavaScript book.
PointedEars
Jul 20 '05 #7

P: n/a
> Now you only need to fix that e-mail address fake (if that would
have been correct, I would have mailed you the above instead of
posting off-topic): <http://www.interhack.net/pubs/munging-harmful/>


After reading this article, I must say, I disagree that it is of much harm.
I will continue to mung my address.
Jul 20 '05 #8

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