By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
437,605 Members | 2,153 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 437,605 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

How to open html page without scrollbar, location...

P: n/a
Dear all,

I have a html code like

<a href="product.html" target=new>product</a>

Although the file "product.html" can be opened at the new page, but with
scrollbar, menu, location, and so on, please help me to write the javascript
code or others in order to remove all such features when open this page,
thanks.

Regards,
Simon


Jul 20 '05 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
3 Replies


P: n/a
"simon lee" <th****@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:bq**********@hfc.pacific.net.hk...
I have a html code like

<a href="product.html" target=new>product</a>

Although the file "product.html" can be opened at the new page,
but with scrollbar, menu, location, and so on, please help me to
write the javascript code or others in order to remove all such
features when open this page, thanks.


The days of being able to control the features of new window with
JavaScript are in the past. The scripts that were written with that
intention are no longer reliable and ultimately the user can have the
features that they want on any new window regardless of the attitude of
a page author. As a result, the more you perceive a *need* to control
window features the more significance the inability to do so reliably
becomes. As a result it is better to identify the cause of your desire
to influence the features of this new window, as that is your real
problem, and fix whatever it is that makes you think that you need to
control the features of the new window.

(Apart from that, rather than re-asking the same question, a search on
any search engine for something like "window opening script" will turn
up (literally) thousands of examples. And if you make sure that you
never test them on anything but default configurations of IE on default
windows SO installations you may even get the impression that some of
them work.)

Richard.
Jul 20 '05 #2

P: n/a
DU
Richard Cornford wrote:
"simon lee" <th****@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:bq**********@hfc.pacific.net.hk...
I have a html code like

<a href="product.html" target=new>product</a>

Although the file "product.html" can be opened at the new page,
but with scrollbar, menu, location, and so on, please help me to
write the javascript code or others in order to remove all such
features when open this page, thanks.

The days of being able to control the features of new window with
JavaScript are in the past. The scripts that were written with that
intention are no longer reliable and ultimately the user can have the
features that they want on any new window regardless of the attitude of
a page author. As a result, the more you perceive a *need* to control
window features the more significance the inability to do so reliably
becomes. As a result it is better to identify the cause of your desire
to influence the features of this new window, as that is your real
problem, and fix whatever it is that makes you think that you need to
control the features of the new window.


I think the main issue is not as much that such desire, goal is no
longer safely achievable in a reliable manner as that such desire, goal
is anti-accessibility to content and to browser functionalities (e.g.:
increasing font size, printing, saving in a bookmark, etc.) and
counter-usability. Trying to remove scrollbars, statusbar, etc... just
makes a window less flexible, less usable, can only contribute to
problems (increase chances of creating problems) to problems on the user
end.
There are many coding manners, practices, webdesign implementations
which can be achieved in a reliable manner and which are definitively
not recommendable.
(Apart from that, rather than re-asking the same question,


Richard, the OP multiposted that question in several newsgroups.

DU


Jul 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
"DU" <dr*******@hotWIPETHISmail.com> wrote in message
news:bq**********@news.eusc.inter.net...
<snip>
I think the main issue is not as much that such desire, goal
is no longer safely achievable in a reliable manner as that
such desire, goal is anti-accessibility to content and to
browser functionalities (e.g.: increasing font size, printing,
saving in a bookmark, etc.) and counter-usability. Trying to
remove scrollbars, statusbar, etc... just makes a window less
flexible, less usable, can only contribute to problems (increase
chances of creating problems) to problems on the user end.
I would not disagree that removing all window features will have exactly
those consequences. So there are two facts:-

The desired goal is a really bad idea and will predictably cause more
problems than it could ever be hoped to address.

-And:-

The desired goal cannot be achieved reliably so whatever the problem it
is intended to address this cannot be a solution.

Either, in isolation, would be grounds for abandoning the goal and
re-defining the problem into a form that has a solution. Put them
together and the current goal should not even seem worth considering.
There are many coding manners, practices, webdesign
implementations which can be achieved in a reliable manner
and which are definitively not recommendable.


Yes, there are certainly no shortage of bad ideas that can be
implemented reliably. But then there was a time when the control of
window features could be attempted with some reliability, and it was the
ill-considered use of that ability that resulted in it becoming
unreliable.
(Apart from that, rather than re-asking the same question,


Richard, the OP multiposted that question in several newsgroups.


I hadn't noticed the question in other groups, just yesterdays here.
Which mostly received answers stressing the undesirability of the
action, which in part is what motivated me to stress the reliability
aspect of the proposed goal, for some variety. I am not surprised that,
if re-posted here upon receiving a disparaging response, the question
was multiposted elsewhere.

Richard.
Jul 20 '05 #4

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.