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How to modify text on first window from child of second window?

P: n/a
Subject says it all.

Given:
Window A with text field.
Window B with a button (onClick opens Window C)
Window C with a button (onClick I want it to modify text fields of
Window A)

I have tried storing the handle of Window A ( var winHandle = this; )
in a global variable/file ( globals.js ) and then accessing it from
Window C ( winHandle.document.txt1.value = "blah";) But I am having
problems with globals. (Differnt problem and post all together. But
I tell you this globals don't behave like they do in C. And they are
pissing me off.)

Any help greatly appreciated.

jg
Jul 20 '05 #1
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2 Replies


P: n/a
DU
Juan Garcia wrote:
Subject says it all.

Given:
Window A with text field.
Window B with a button (onClick opens Window C)
Window C with a button (onClick I want it to modify text fields of
Window A)

I have tried storing the handle of Window A ( var winHandle = this; )
in a global variable/file ( globals.js ) and then accessing it from
Window C ( winHandle.document.txt1.value = "blah";) But I am having
problems with globals. (Differnt problem and post all together. But
I tell you this globals don't behave like they do in C. And they are
pissing me off.)

Any help greatly appreciated.

jg


What's the relation between window A and window B? Is window B a
secondary window of window A, opened with a window.open() call? That is
important.
You need to give more details. An url would be convenient.

I think you should also consider what usability studies have proven
everywhere: the more windows there are, the more users get confused and
new windows defeat the convenience of the Back button and history object.
"Research shows that most users don't like to run more than one
application at a time. In fact, many users are confused by multiple
applications."
Windows User Experience team,
Microsoft Windows User Experience Frequently Asked Questions: Why is the
taskbar at the bottom of the screen?,
March 2001

DU
--
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http://www10.brinkster.com/doctorunclear/
- Resources, help and tips for Netscape 7.x users and Composer
- Interactive demos on Popup windows, music (audio/midi) in Netscape 7.x
http://www10.brinkster.com/doctorunc...e7Section.html

Jul 20 '05 #2

P: n/a
Window A and Window B are two frames on the same brower. Window A has
a treeview and Window B has command buttons. Window C is a popup that
is openned when a button on Window B is pressed. Now when user enters
input into the popup window (Window C) I want to update the contents
of the treeview (Window A.)

A tangent question is, do Window A and Window C share memory space?
In other words do they share globals. If I include globals.js in both
do they share the same variables or do they each have their one
"globals?"

jg

DU <dr*******@hotREMOVEmail.com> wrote in message news:<bg**********@news.eusc.inter.net>...
Juan Garcia wrote:
Subject says it all.

Given:
Window A with text field.
Window B with a button (onClick opens Window C)
Window C with a button (onClick I want it to modify text fields of
Window A)

I have tried storing the handle of Window A ( var winHandle = this; )
in a global variable/file ( globals.js ) and then accessing it from
Window C ( winHandle.document.txt1.value = "blah";) But I am having
problems with globals. (Differnt problem and post all together. But
I tell you this globals don't behave like they do in C. And they are
pissing me off.)

Any help greatly appreciated.

jg


What's the relation between window A and window B? Is window B a
secondary window of window A, opened with a window.open() call? That is
important.
You need to give more details. An url would be convenient.

I think you should also consider what usability studies have proven
everywhere: the more windows there are, the more users get confused and
new windows defeat the convenience of the Back button and history object.
"Research shows that most users don't like to run more than one
application at a time. In fact, many users are confused by multiple
applications."
Windows User Experience team,
Microsoft Windows User Experience Frequently Asked Questions: Why is the
taskbar at the bottom of the screen?,
March 2001

DU

Jul 20 '05 #3

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