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Scripting Strategy To Filesystem Interface

P: n/a

I am curious as to the strategy experienced scripters use when trying to
interface with the filesystem through the web document. This for scripters
who try to write web documents acting as applications (HTA?) which are
opened on the localhost, and so there is no question regarding security
here once the user accepts that the downloaded document represents no
threat.

For instance, some scripters are used to Unix style function calls
(opendir, readdir, etc) and prefer to use such an interface. They would
then create a library of wrapper code with calls specific to the multiple
or major systems they wish to target (say either a Unix-type or Windows-
type).

With Unix-type systems however, there is no real concept of drives except
to mount a physical drive within the hierarchy as a (sub)directory path.
In this case, perhaps it is preferable to write script in which the
interface is entirely via Microsoft's FileSystemObject methods, and then
writing wrappers for those methods in the case where the filesystem is
actually a Unix/Linux-type system. This might especially be true for
coders who like the Open/Save As... type dialogs presented by Windows, and
so they are willing to do handstands and somersaults to present a graphical
interface with graphical web browsers.

I would like to know what approach those of you have tried or prefer for
cases where you wrote documents that open/save to the filesystem.
Sep 13 '08 #1
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3 Replies


P: n/a
"Patient Guy" <sevisen.adam@gmailDOTHEREcomwrote in message
news:Xn******************@216.168.3.44...
>
I am curious as to the strategy experienced scripters use when trying to
interface with the filesystem through the web document. This for
scripters
who try to write web documents acting as applications (HTA?) which are
opened on the localhost, and so there is no question regarding security
here once the user accepts that the downloaded document represents no
threat.

For instance, some scripters are used to Unix style function calls
(opendir, readdir, etc) and prefer to use such an interface. They would
then create a library of wrapper code with calls specific to the multiple
or major systems they wish to target (say either a Unix-type or Windows-
type).

With Unix-type systems however, there is no real concept of drives except
to mount a physical drive within the hierarchy as a (sub)directory path.
In this case, perhaps it is preferable to write script in which the
interface is entirely via Microsoft's FileSystemObject methods, and then
writing wrappers for those methods in the case where the filesystem is
actually a Unix/Linux-type system. This might especially be true for
coders who like the Open/Save As... type dialogs presented by Windows, and
so they are willing to do handstands and somersaults to present a
graphical
interface with graphical web browsers.

I would like to know what approach those of you have tried or prefer for
cases where you wrote documents that open/save to the filesystem.
I was under the impression that HTA is Microsoft thing, I wasn't aware other
platforms supported it.
As such when I've resorted to a HTA I just use FileSystemObject or
ADODB.Stream directly.

--
Anthony Jones - MVP ASP/ASP.NET

Sep 13 '08 #2

P: n/a
I think you need to be more specific.

I do not know much about Unix, but I know it does have a concept of drives.
The concept likely is not clear to you but it will be very useful for you to
learn these concepts as they relate to each of the two operating systems
(Windows and Unix/Linux).
"Patient Guy" <sevisen.adam@gmailDOTHEREcomwrote in message
news:Xn******************@216.168.3.44...
>
I am curious as to the strategy experienced scripters use when trying to
interface with the filesystem through the web document. This for
scripters
who try to write web documents acting as applications (HTA?) which are
opened on the localhost, and so there is no question regarding security
here once the user accepts that the downloaded document represents no
threat.

For instance, some scripters are used to Unix style function calls
(opendir, readdir, etc) and prefer to use such an interface. They would
then create a library of wrapper code with calls specific to the multiple
or major systems they wish to target (say either a Unix-type or Windows-
type).

With Unix-type systems however, there is no real concept of drives except
to mount a physical drive within the hierarchy as a (sub)directory path.
In this case, perhaps it is preferable to write script in which the
interface is entirely via Microsoft's FileSystemObject methods, and then
writing wrappers for those methods in the case where the filesystem is
actually a Unix/Linux-type system. This might especially be true for
coders who like the Open/Save As... type dialogs presented by Windows, and
so they are willing to do handstands and somersaults to present a
graphical
interface with graphical web browsers.

I would like to know what approach those of you have tried or prefer for
cases where you wrote documents that open/save to the filesystem.

Sep 14 '08 #3

P: n/a
Sam Hobbs wrote:
I think you need to be more specific.
Add me.
I do not know much about Unix, but I know it does have a concept of drives.
As a physical device, yes; unlike WinDOS, where a "drive" is a considered a
logical unit (a partition or volume) that is assigned a "drive letter".
Unices have nothing of the sort (unless, of course, you create a mount point
with that name).
The concept likely is not clear to you but it will be very useful for you to
learn these concepts as they relate to each of the two operating systems
(Windows and Unix/Linux).
Linux is but the kernel of the GNU/Linux operating system, though.
[Top post]
Please don't do that. And fix your sender address so that it complies with
Internet standards.
F'up2 c.l.js

PointedEars
--
Use any version of Microsoft Frontpage to create your site.
(This won't prevent people from viewing your source, but no one
will want to steal it.)
-- from <http://www.vortex-webdesign.com/help/hidesource.htm>
Sep 14 '08 #4

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