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Newbie Question: Good Downloadable Tutorial

P: n/a
I'd like to learn JavaScript while sitting in my easy chair with my
laptop on my lap.

Option 1: Buy a wireless router so I can access the plethora of online-
only tutorials from anywhere in the house.

Option 2: Buy a book and try to figure out how to read a book with one
hand while using the laptop with the other.

Option 3: Find a good downloadable tutorial (either PDF or a bundle of
self-contained html files) that I can read while offline.

Option 3 would be lovely ... but I haven't yet found a good
downloadable tutorial. I have the Core Guide and the Core Reference,
but neither of them is structured as a tutorial.

FWIW, I know a couple of programming languages already, and also basic
HTML. I don't need a Dummies book, but I'd appreciate a step-by-step
structure with examples I can try out.

Is there such a resource? If so, where might I find it? Thanks!

--Jim Aikin
Jul 10 '08 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
Jim Aikin wrote:
I'd like to learn JavaScript while sitting in my easy chair with my
laptop on my lap.
Option 3: Find a good downloadable tutorial (either PDF or a bundle of
self-contained html files) that I can read while offline.
Is there such a resource? If so, where might I find it? Thanks!
--Jim Aikin
Good place to start:

http://www.google.com/search?q=javas...dable+tutorial

You can also download the videos from the YUI library:

http://developer.yahoo.com/yui/theater/
Jul 10 '08 #2

P: n/a
On Jul 10, 12:49 am, Stevo <n...@mail.invalidwrote:
Jim Aikin wrote:
Option 3: Find a good downloadable tutorial (either PDF or a bundle of
self-contained html files) that I can read while offline.
Is there such a resource? If so, where might I find it? Thanks!
--Jim Aikin

Good place to start:

http://www.google.com/search?q=javas...dable+tutorial

You can also download the videos from the YUI library:

http://developer.yahoo.com/yui/theater/
I've tried various search strings in google, and been through page
after page of online tutorials. I haven't yet found what I'm looking
for -- a book-length downloadable tutorial.

It's a bit hard for me to imagine how one would teach a programming
language using videos. Seems like a pure waste of bandwidth. But I'll
check it out.

Has anyone seen anything like what I'm looking for?

--JA
Jul 10 '08 #3

P: n/a
Jim Aikin wrote on 10 jul 2008 in comp.lang.javascript:
I've tried various search strings in google, and been through page
after page of online tutorials. I haven't yet found what I'm looking
for -- a book-length downloadable tutorial.

It's a bit hard for me to imagine how one would teach a programming
language using videos. Seems like a pure waste of bandwidth. But I'll
check it out.

Has anyone seen anything like what I'm looking for?
You cannot learn programming from books, or even from tutorials.
Programming is a hands-on experience. Yes, if there was a good book in
Javascript it could get you on the way, alas there is not.

The main programming knowledge comes from the interactive experience and
the cycle of programming and debugging, from examining what others have
done and where they have failed. And not being afraid of your own 'artistic
licence' in design and enjoying that for it's own sake.

--
Evertjan.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
Jul 10 '08 #4

P: n/a
Jim Aikin wrote on 11 jul 2008 in comp.lang.javascript:
On Jul 10, 11:23 am, "Evertjan." <exjxw.hannivo...@interxnl.net>
wrote:
>You cannot learn programming from books, or even from tutorials.
Programming is a hands-on experience.

Not to be snarky or anything, but that seems like a rather extreme
position. Are you suggesting that you yourself learned Javascript (or
any other programming language) without studying it in a book? I don't
think you meant to imply that, but that's what a plain reading of your
statement would suggest.
See Richard's exensive answer about Javascript books.

It is like gardening [of which there seem to be good books, I suppose],
you can learn about flowers and trees, but the hands-on experience will
be far more crucial. And what about singing, painting, doctoring, diving,
banking, etc.?

In programming, much of wat you learn you learn by debugging, from your
mistakes.
Are you suggesting that you yourself learned Javascript (or
any other programming language) without studying it in a book?
Yes, since the little book on Fortran that was given to me arond 1965,
when [mainframe!] hands-on experience was simply not available, I only
read specs, and in Javascript with it's many implementations and flavors,
the spec's are by far secondary [thirdly?] to the experience.

The notion of formatted output, so prominent in that Fortran, simply did
not ring any bell for me then, and I now see many people believing that
the standard way a numeric value is outputted as a string in Javascript
and alike to be the way it is stored in memory. I doubt if you leard
those things in books, without experiencing the practical implications.

Next was the Signetics/Philips 2650 Assembler language, no books,
marginal specs.

Then Central Data Basic for the 2650 [with nice BCD numeric storage!]
written by an upstart named William Gates, we had to retro-engeneer to
give it is full potential.

Etc.

--
Evertjan.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
Jul 11 '08 #5

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