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acrobat doesn't close

P: n/a
I'm testing the embedding of a PDF in a page

<embed
src="test.pdf"
style="position:absolute; left:10px; top:10px; width:290px;
height:390px;">
</embed>

I installed acrobat reader version 8.1 (I think) of the reader. The
problem is that when the browser is closed the reader doesn't close.

AcrodRd32.exe continues running for about 30 seconds so if I navigate to
a bunch of pages fairly quickly I get an error about having reached the
maximum numbers of PDF instances a browser window can open.

Is there a way to "force" acrobat reader to close?

Andrew Poulos
Jul 7 '08 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
Andrew Poulos wrote:
Is there a way to "force" acrobat reader to close?
Is there a way for you to post on-topic?
PointedEars
--
Prototype.js was written by people who don't know javascript for people
who don't know javascript. People who don't know javascript are not
the best source of advice on designing systems that use javascript.
-- Richard Cornford, cljs, <f8*******************@news.demon.co.uk>
Jul 7 '08 #2

P: n/a

Andrew Poulos schreef:
I'm testing the embedding of a PDF in a page

<embed
src="test.pdf"
style="position:absolute; left:10px; top:10px; width:290px;
height:390px;">
</embed>

I installed acrobat reader version 8.1 (I think) of the reader. The
problem is that when the browser is closed the reader doesn't close.

AcrodRd32.exe continues running for about 30 seconds so if I navigate to
a bunch of pages fairly quickly I get an error about having reached the
maximum numbers of PDF instances a browser window can open.

Is there a way to "force" acrobat reader to close?

Andrew Poulos
Hi Andrew,

I doubt you will solve this in JavaScript.
You didn't use JavaScript to open the pfd, you didn't use JavaScript to
modify it, so what makes you think JavaScript will close it?
Let alone JavaScript closes a running exe....

Try a Adobe newsgroup.

Regards,
Erwin Moller
Jul 7 '08 #3

P: n/a
Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:
Andrew Poulos wrote:
>Is there a way to "force" acrobat reader to close?

Is there a way for you to post on-topic?
Sorry I was kind of hoping there was something javascript could do to
release whatever acrobat reader was holding onto.

Andrew Poulos
Jul 7 '08 #4

P: n/a
Andrew Poulos wrote:
Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:
>Andrew Poulos wrote:
>>Is there a way to "force" acrobat reader to close?
Is there a way for you to post on-topic?

Sorry I was kind of hoping there was something javascript could do to
release whatever acrobat reader was holding onto.
You have not been thinking this through. If what you describe would be
generally possible with client-side HTML-UA-based scripting, any Web site
could close any application you are running, except if you had script
support disabled.

That Adobe Reader keeps running in the background is not a bug, it's a
feature. A bad one at that, but such happens frequently with monopolist's
software. Try Foxit Reader instead; it won't give you a plugin for Firefox
(yet), but it will also not keep system resources reserved when not needed.

BTW, your markup is unnecessarily invalid. <http://validator.w3.org/>
PointedEars
--
var bugRiddenCrashPronePieceOfJunk = (
navigator.userAgent.indexOf('MSIE 5') != -1
&& navigator.userAgent.indexOf('Mac') != -1
) // Plone, register_function.js:16
Jul 7 '08 #5

P: n/a
Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:
Andrew Poulos wrote:
>Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:
>>Andrew Poulos wrote:
Is there a way to "force" acrobat reader to close?
Is there a way for you to post on-topic?
Sorry I was kind of hoping there was something javascript could do to
release whatever acrobat reader was holding onto.

You have not been thinking this through. If what you describe would be
generally possible with client-side HTML-UA-based scripting, any Web site
could close any application you are running, except if you had script
support disabled.
I thought (wrongly) that as some HTML is causing the reader to launch
then perhaps...
That Adobe Reader keeps running in the background is not a bug, it's a
feature. A bad one at that, but such happens frequently with monopolist's
software. Try Foxit Reader instead; it won't give you a plugin for Firefox
(yet), but it will also not keep system resources reserved when not needed.
I have enough trouble with plugins without asking my users to install
some small player's plugin (even though it may indeed be vastly superior
software).
BTW, your markup is unnecessarily invalid. <http://validator.w3.org/>
This is something I've been struggling with: do I strive for 100%
standards compliance or should I take a more pragmatic approach. With
some media I'm finding that going for a 100% standards compliant
solution actually results in other issues that I've not been able to solve.

Andrew Poulos





Jul 8 '08 #6

P: n/a
Andrew Poulos wrote:
Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:
>Andrew Poulos wrote:
>>Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:
Andrew Poulos wrote:
Is there a way to "force" acrobat reader to close?
Is there a way for you to post on-topic?
Sorry I was kind of hoping there was something javascript could do to
release whatever acrobat reader was holding onto.
You have not been thinking this through. If what you describe would be
generally possible with client-side HTML-UA-based scripting, any Web site
could close any application you are running, except if you had script
support disabled.

I thought (wrongly) that as some HTML is causing the reader to launch
then perhaps...
*The browser* is causing the reader (plugin) to launch. HTML is not a
programming language.
>That Adobe Reader keeps running in the background is not a bug, it's a
feature. A bad one at that, but such happens frequently with monopolist's
software. Try Foxit Reader instead; it won't give you a plugin for Firefox
(yet), but it will also not keep system resources reserved when not needed.

I have enough trouble with plugins without asking my users to install
some small player's plugin (even though it may indeed be vastly superior
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
software).
Apparently you have not been paying attention. Foxit Reader is an
alternative free *PDF viewer*, and as I said, it does _not_ provide a plugin
_for Firefox_ yet, so it runs as a standalone application then. But there
is a plugin for IE that is considerably faster and less resource-consuming
than the Adobe Reader equivalent. (Therefore, on Windows you can use the
IE Tab extension for Firefox to trigger IE and its Foxit plugin with
/\.pdf$/ and the like.)

Anyhow, Foxit Reader exits when you don't need it anymore, while Adobe
Reader does not do that (as you have observed).

<http://foxitsoftware.com/>
>BTW, your markup is unnecessarily invalid. <http://validator.w3.org/>

This is something I've been struggling with: do I strive for 100%
standards compliance or should I take a more pragmatic approach. With
some media I'm finding that going for a 100% standards compliant
solution actually results in other issues that I've not been able to solve.
Trying to embed a PDF document in a Web document is a pointless exercise
anyway, as not everybody has or wants to use a PDF plugin. You will be much
better off setting a hyperlink to the PDF document instead, and properly
mark it as such.
X-Post & F'up2 comp.infosystems.www.authoring.misc

PointedEars
--
Prototype.js was written by people who don't know javascript for people
who don't know javascript. People who don't know javascript are not
the best source of advice on designing systems that use javascript.
-- Richard Cornford, cljs, <f8*******************@news.demon.co.uk>
Jul 8 '08 #7

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