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IE is driving me crazy

P: n/a
I am going nuts with IE problems. Here is my problem:

Firefox: Shows things properly; javascripts work; etc. etc.

IE6: The "onClick" doesn't invoke the javascript that is designated. I
know this because for testing purposes to figure out this problem, I put
an alert to show that I get there. It doesn't alert.

IE7: The application doesn't even come up. It says there is a runtime
error; that it is expecting a ';' at line 1; and asks if I want to
debug. If I answer yes, it just closes that popup and continues without
entering any debug module.

This application is driven by AJAX and has a template that loads the JS
libraries. When IE7 completes, it indicates that there is no content in
the content area. The others (IE6 and FF) present a menu in the menubar.

Questions:
1 - Is there ANY tool, however crippled, that can help me debug IE6's
problems of not reaching the javascript?
2 - Is there anything I need to load on my computer so that IE7 will
enter some debug module?
3 - Does anyone have any idea why a javascript might not be reachable in
IE, but is in FF?

Oh how I wish I had something like Firebug for Internet Explorer.... -:(
Jun 27 '08 #1
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22 Replies


P: n/a
sheldonlg wrote:
I am going nuts with IE problems. Here is my problem:

Firefox: Shows things properly; javascripts work; etc. etc.

IE6: The "onClick" doesn't invoke the javascript that is designated. I
know this because for testing purposes to figure out this problem, I put
an alert to show that I get there. It doesn't alert.

IE7: The application doesn't even come up. It says there is a runtime
error; that it is expecting a ';' at line 1; and asks if I want to
debug. If I answer yes, it just closes that popup and continues without
entering any debug module.

This application is driven by AJAX and has a template that loads the JS
libraries. When IE7 completes, it indicates that there is no content in
the content area. The others (IE6 and FF) present a menu in the menubar.

Questions:
1 - Is there ANY tool, however crippled, that can help me debug IE6's
problems of not reaching the javascript?
2 - Is there anything I need to load on my computer so that IE7 will
enter some debug module?
3 - Does anyone have any idea why a javascript might not be reachable in
IE, but is in FF?

Oh how I wish I had something like Firebug for Internet Explorer.... -:(
Here is a little more [confusing] information. I will show below two
javacripts. One work in both FF and IE6. One only worked in FF.

Worked in both (with debugging alert inserted):
function addSupplier()
{
var searchList = document.getElementById("supplierList");
var myObj = new Object();
var ind = searchList.selectedIndex;
var val = searchList.options[ind].value;
alert('val=' + val);
if (val == '-1' || val == -1)
{
alert('A valid value is required for the supplier');
}
else
{
// Blank out the search and the listbox
var searchKeyword =
document.getElementById("supplierSearchText");
var listSpan = document.getElementById("supplierListSpan");
searchKeyword.value = '';
listSpan.innerHTML = '<select id="supplierList"></select>';

myObj.id = val;
alert('calling addSupplier with ' + myObj.id);
handleExternalEvent('Pccr', 'SupplierConfigurationController',
'addSupplier', myObj, noCallback);
}
}

Worked only in FF (with debugging alert inserted):
function showFamilyTree(obj, elementId)
{
alert('showing tree for element ' + elementId);
if(elementId == 0) { return;}

var block = document.getElementById(elementId);
if (obj.innerHTML == "Show Tree")
{
block.style.display = "block";
obj.innerHTML = "Hide Tree";
}
else
{
block.style.display = "none";
obj.innerHTML = "Show Tree";
}
}

Jun 27 '08 #2

P: n/a
sheldonlg wrote:
sheldonlg wrote:
>I am going nuts with IE problems. Here is my problem:

Firefox: Shows things properly; javascripts work; etc. etc.

IE6: The "onClick" doesn't invoke the javascript that is designated.
I know this because for testing purposes to figure out this problem, I
put an alert to show that I get there. It doesn't alert.

IE7: The application doesn't even come up. It says there is a runtime
error; that it is expecting a ';' at line 1; and asks if I want to
debug. If I answer yes, it just closes that popup and continues
without entering any debug module.

This application is driven by AJAX and has a template that loads the
JS libraries. When IE7 completes, it indicates that there is no
content in the content area. The others (IE6 and FF) present a menu
in the menubar.

Questions:
1 - Is there ANY tool, however crippled, that can help me debug IE6's
problems of not reaching the javascript?
2 - Is there anything I need to load on my computer so that IE7 will
enter some debug module?
3 - Does anyone have any idea why a javascript might not be reachable
in IE, but is in FF?

Oh how I wish I had something like Firebug for Internet Explorer.... -:(

Here is a little more [confusing] information. I will show below two
javacripts. One work in both FF and IE6. One only worked in FF.

Worked in both (with debugging alert inserted):
function addSupplier()
{
var searchList = document.getElementById("supplierList");
var myObj = new Object();
var ind = searchList.selectedIndex;
var val = searchList.options[ind].value;
alert('val=' + val);
if (val == '-1' || val == -1)
{
alert('A valid value is required for the supplier');
}
else
{
// Blank out the search and the listbox
var searchKeyword =
document.getElementById("supplierSearchText");
var listSpan = document.getElementById("supplierListSpan");
searchKeyword.value = '';
listSpan.innerHTML = '<select id="supplierList"></select>';

myObj.id = val;
alert('calling addSupplier with ' + myObj.id);
handleExternalEvent('Pccr', 'SupplierConfigurationController',
'addSupplier', myObj, noCallback);
}
}

Worked only in FF (with debugging alert inserted):
function showFamilyTree(obj, elementId)
{
alert('showing tree for element ' + elementId);
if(elementId == 0) { return;}

var block = document.getElementById(elementId);
if (obj.innerHTML == "Show Tree")
{
block.style.display = "block";
obj.innerHTML = "Hide Tree";
}
else
{
block.style.display = "none";
obj.innerHTML = "Show Tree";
}
}
It didn't make a difference if I corrected the line:
if(elementId == 0) { return;}

to more properly be:
if (elementId.length == 0) { return;}
Jun 27 '08 #3

P: n/a
sheldonlg meinte:
>IE6: The "onClick" doesn't invoke the javascript that is designated.
I know this because for testing purposes to figure out this problem, I
put an alert to show that I get there. It doesn't alert.
Have you activated "show script errors"? I suppose not.
>IE7: The application doesn't even come up. It says there is a runtime
error; that it is expecting a ';' at line 1; and asks if I want to
debug. If I answer yes, it just closes that popup and continues
without entering any debug module.
Have you installed a script debugger? I suppose not.
>1 - Is there ANY tool, however crippled, that can help me debug IE6's
problems of not reaching the javascript?
2 - Is there anything I need to load on my computer so that IE7 will
enter some debug module?
<http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2004/10/26/247912.aspx>

Another (rather shoddy) tool for DOM inspection:
>http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=e59c3964-672d-4511-bb3e-2d5e1db91038&displaylang=en>
>3 - Does anyone have any idea why a javascript might not be reachable
in IE, but is in FF?
Hmmm. Showing some of your code snippets might help.
Worked only in FF (with debugging alert inserted):
function showFamilyTree(obj, elementId)
{
alert('showing tree for element ' + elementId);
[snip]

Then the error is somewhere "before" this function call.

Gregor
--
http://photo.gregorkofler.at ::: Landschafts- und Reisefotografie
http://web.gregorkofler.com ::: meine JS-Spielwiese
http://www.image2d.com ::: Bildagentur für den alpinen Raum
Jun 27 '08 #4

P: n/a
sheldonlg meinte:
>Worked only in FF (with debugging alert inserted):
>function showFamilyTree(obj, elementId)
{
alert('showing tree for element ' + elementId);
Is this line reached?
> if(elementId == 0) { return;}

var block = document.getElementById(elementId);
if (obj.innerHTML == "Show Tree")
{
block.style.display = "block";
obj.innerHTML = "Hide Tree";
}
else
{
block.style.display = "none";
obj.innerHTML = "Show Tree";
}
}

It didn't make a difference if I corrected the line:
if(elementId == 0) { return;}

to more properly be:
if (elementId.length == 0) { return;}
What is "obj", what is "elementId"? The latter one is a string, right?
Otherwise getElementById() won't make sense. So how does elementId == 0
fit in?

Plus: You can add more alerts to narrow down, the line, where your code
breaks.

Gregor
--
http://photo.gregorkofler.at ::: Landschafts- und Reisefotografie
http://web.gregorkofler.com ::: meine JS-Spielwiese
http://www.image2d.com ::: Bildagentur für den alpinen Raum
Jun 27 '08 #5

P: n/a
Gregor Kofler wrote:
sheldonlg meinte:
>>Worked only in FF (with debugging alert inserted):
>>function showFamilyTree(obj, elementId)
{
alert('showing tree for element ' + elementId);

Is this line reached?
Apparantly not. That is why I put it there -- to verify whether or not
I got into the script.

>
>> if(elementId == 0) { return;}

var block = document.getElementById(elementId);
if (obj.innerHTML == "Show Tree")
{
block.style.display = "block";
obj.innerHTML = "Hide Tree";
}
else
{
block.style.display = "none";
obj.innerHTML = "Show Tree";
}
}

It didn't make a difference if I corrected the line:
if(elementId == 0) { return;}

to more properly be:
if (elementId.length == 0) { return;}

What is "obj", what is "elementId"? The latter one is a string, right?
Otherwise getElementById() won't make sense. So how does elementId == 0
fit in?
Yes, it is a string. That is why I correct the script to
if (elementId.length == 0){ return;}
It represent the id of the tag of the block that is to be shown or hidden.

obj is the element that the invocation of the script was on. I just
want to toggle what shows on the screen between "Show Tree" and "Hide
Tree".
>
Plus: You can add more alerts to narrow down, the line, where your code
breaks.
I can't go much before the first line :-).

I have enabled what I can and installed the developer toolbar and
downloaded the script debugger. I'll report back after testing further.
Jun 27 '08 #6

P: n/a
sheldonlg meinte:
>>>function showFamilyTree(obj, elementId)
{
alert('showing tree for element ' + elementId);

Is this line reached?

Apparantly not. That is why I put it there -- to verify whether or not
I got into the script.
Then look elsewhere. The code might be fleaky, but the error is
apparently outside this function.

Gregor

--
http://photo.gregorkofler.at ::: Landschafts- und Reisefotografie
http://web.gregorkofler.com ::: meine JS-Spielwiese
http://www.image2d.com ::: Bildagentur für den alpinen Raum
Jun 27 '08 #7

P: n/a
Questions:
1 - Is there ANY tool, however crippled, that can help me debug IE6's
problems of not reaching the javascript?
2 - Is there anything I need to load on my computer so that IE7 will
enter some debug module?
http://www.microsoft.com/express/vwd/

Install, make a dummy project, press debug, open your html when IE
starts,
make what you do to fire the error....
3 - Does anyone have any idea why a javascript might not be reachable in
IE, but is in FF?
hmnn... maybe because FF is a better browser?
Jun 27 '08 #8

P: n/a
Gregor Kofler wrote:
sheldonlg meinte:
>>>>function showFamilyTree(obj, elementId)
{
alert('showing tree for element ' + elementId);

Is this line reached?

Apparantly not. That is why I put it there -- to verify whether or
not I got into the script.

Then look elsewhere. The code might be fleaky, but the error is
apparently outside this function.
Uh, no. Everything works fine in Firefox. It is a simple "onClick".
For some reason it is not even reaching that script in IE -- or IE is
not loading the script. Both are clearly loading the file that contains
that script because other scripts in that file are exercised when
invoked. There is something about this particular script that IE
doesn't like or understand. I researched the object.style.display and
it was added in IE5.

In Firefox, when there is something wrong with the script its attempted
invocation produces a message in Firebug that such-and-such is not a
function. IE doesn't give any message, and FF accepts it.
Jun 27 '08 #9

P: n/a
RoLo wrote:
>Questions:
1 - Is there ANY tool, however crippled, that can help me debug IE6's
problems of not reaching the javascript?
2 - Is there anything I need to load on my computer so that IE7 will
enter some debug module?
http://www.microsoft.com/express/vwd/
This app runs via an AJAX framework with PHP as the backend to the
server. I'll try it, though.
Install, make a dummy project, press debug, open your html when IE
starts,
make what you do to fire the error....
>3 - Does anyone have any idea why a javascript might not be reachable in
IE, but is in FF?
hmnn... maybe because FF is a better browser?
Really? :-)
Jun 27 '08 #10

P: n/a
sheldonlg meinte:
Uh, no. Everything works fine in Firefox. It is a simple "onClick".
It is "onclick", BTW.

Anyway, you state that

<clickableelement onclick="foo()">

<script type="text/javascript">
function foo() { alert ("bar!"); }
</script>

is not working in IE? Impossible. Have you tried
<clickableelement onclick="alert('bar!')">
For some reason it is not even reaching that script in IE -- or IE is
not loading the script. Both are clearly loading the file that contains
that script because other scripts in that file are exercised when
invoked. There is something about this particular script that IE
doesn't like or understand. I researched the object.style.display and
it was added in IE5.
Er... you call that debugging? Since you don't get the alert, why on
earth are you looking into the code *after* the alert?
In Firefox, when there is something wrong with the script its attempted
invocation produces a message in Firebug that such-and-such is not a
function. IE doesn't give any message, and FF accepts it.
Again: Error reporting in your IE is turned on? You have do that
*explicitly* in the settings dialog.

Gregor


--
http://photo.gregorkofler.at ::: Landschafts- und Reisefotografie
http://web.gregorkofler.com ::: meine JS-Spielwiese
http://www.image2d.com ::: Bildagentur für den alpinen Raum
Jun 27 '08 #11

P: n/a
VK
On Apr 28, 9:55 pm, sheldonlg <sheldonlgwrote:
1 - Is there ANY tool, however crippled, that can help me
debug IE6's problems of not reaching the javascript?
1) Go to
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/d...DisplayLang=en
and download "Script Debugger for Windows NT 4.0 and Later"
2) Install the program
3) Make sure that in IE6 Tools Internet Options Advanced tab in
the "Browsing" section the checkbox "Disable Script Debugging
(Internet Explorer)" is off.

Load your page. Now on script error you should see the prompt: click
"Yes". Script Debugger is a lightweight tool and sometimes its error
highlights are way of the base. Still often it is extremely helpful.

By having Script Debugger installed and activated you are also getting
extra JScript command and object available which you can use in your
scripts:
debugger;
command sets the script breakpoint. On meating this command the engine
"freezes" the current context and opens debugger window for further
studies.

Debug (watch the case) object with methods write() and writeln()
allows you to dump any internal var states into debugger for
examinations.

Alas block execution never was implemented, so you cannot write
straight in your script somithing like:
debugger;
Debug.write(a);

You have to split the process by setting breakpoint only - and by
using Debug.write in the debugger window after it is open.
Jun 27 '08 #12

P: n/a
Gregor Kofler wrote:
sheldonlg meinte:
>Uh, no. Everything works fine in Firefox. It is a simple "onClick".

It is "onclick", BTW.

Anyway, you state that

<clickableelement onclick="foo()">

<script type="text/javascript">
function foo() { alert ("bar!"); }
</script>

is not working in IE? Impossible. Have you tried
<clickableelement onclick="alert('bar!')">
In the Developer Toolbar, on the element that does the clicking (span
id=tree_011170), I have in the attribute area:

class fakelink
id tree_011170
onclick showFamilyTree(this, 'parent_011170')

I edited the attribute to be:
onclick alert('click works')

I then clicked the item and it did not alert. The problem is not in the
class fakelink because another clickable item (right after it) uses the
same class and it works. Both those items are within spans that have
the class fakelink attached to them. (fakelink is a class that makes it
look like a link). Just for the hell of it, I turned off pop-up blocker
and it made no difference. Also, another control that I was looking at
calls a javascript that has alerts and it alerts properly. There is
something about THIS particular control that IE does not like. The line
of code for this item is very straightforward and is:

<td align="center"><span id="tree_011170" class="fakelink"
onclick="showFamilyTree(this,'parent_011170')">Sho w Tree</span></td>

Finally, I also changed the code (for this debugging) so that for this
particular item it wrote directly:

<td align="center"><span id="tree_011170" class="fakelink"
onclick="alert('click works')">Show Tree</span></td>

Still nothing.

Once again, this all works perfectly in Firefox.
BTW: I also found out something interesting about the Toolbar in doing
all of this. I did some operations after setting the onclick in the
Toolbar as above that caused a re-rendering of the page with new
innerHTML. The onclick did not change back to the function, but stayed
at a straight alert -- even though the innerHTML rewrote the line to
call the function.

Again: Error reporting in your IE is turned on? You have do that
*explicitly* in the settings dialog.
It is turned on. I had already unchecked the "Disable Script Debugging
(Internet Explorer)" after your first reply.
>
Gregor
Jun 27 '08 #13

P: n/a
Gregor Kofler wrote:
sheldonlg meinte:
>Uh, no. Everything works fine in Firefox. It is a simple "onClick".

It is "onclick", BTW.

Anyway, you state that

<clickableelement onclick="foo()">

<script type="text/javascript">
function foo() { alert ("bar!"); }
</script>

is not working in IE? Impossible. Have you tried
<clickableelement onclick="alert('bar!')">
In the Developer Toolbar, on the element that does the clicking (span
id=tree_011170), I have in the attribute area:

class fakelink
id tree_011170
onclick showFamilyTree(this, 'parent_011170')

I edited the attribute to be:
onclick alert('click works')

I then clicked the item and it did not alert. The problem is not in the
class fakelink because another clickable item (right after it) uses the
same class and it works. Both those items are within spans that have
the class fakelink attached to them. (fakelink is a class that makes it
look like a link). Just for the hell of it, I turned off pop-up blocker
and it made no difference. Also, another control that I was looking at
calls a javascript that has alerts and it alerts properly. There is
something about THIS particular control that IE does not like. The line
of code for this item is very straightforward and is:

<td align="center"><span id="tree_011170" class="fakelink"
onclick="showFamilyTree(this,'parent_011170')">Sho w Tree</span></td>

Finally, I also changed the code (for this debugging) so that for this
particular item it wrote directly:

<td align="center"><span id="tree_011170" class="fakelink"
onclick="alert('click works')">Show Tree</span></td>

Still nothing.

Once again, this all works perfectly in Firefox.
BTW: I also found out something interesting about the Toolbar in doing
all of this. I did some operations after setting the onclick in the
Toolbar as above that caused a re-rendering of the page with new
innerHTML. The onclick did not change back to the function, but stayed
at a straight alert -- even though the innerHTML rewrote the line to
call the function.

Again: Error reporting in your IE is turned on? You have do that
*explicitly* in the settings dialog.
It is turned on. I had already unchecked the "Disable Script Debugging
(Internet Explorer)" after your first reply.
>
Gregor

Jun 27 '08 #14

P: n/a
Gregor Kofler wrote:
sheldonlg meinte:
>Uh, no. Everything works fine in Firefox. It is a simple "onClick".

It is "onclick", BTW.

Anyway, you state that

<clickableelement onclick="foo()">

<script type="text/javascript">
function foo() { alert ("bar!"); }
</script>

is not working in IE? Impossible. Have you tried
<clickableelement onclick="alert('bar!')">
In the Developer Toolbar, on the element that does the clicking (span
id=tree_011170), I have in the attribute area:

class fakelink
id tree_011170
onclick showFamilyTree(this, 'parent_011170')

I edited the attribute to be:
onclick alert('click works')

I then clicked the item and it did not alert. The problem is not in the
class fakelink because another clickable item (right after it) uses the
same class and it works. Both those items are within spans that have
the class fakelink attached to them. (fakelink is a class that makes it
look like a link). Just for the hell of it, I turned off pop-up blocker
and it made no difference. Also, another control that I was looking at
calls a javascript that has alerts and it alerts properly. There is
something about THIS particular control that IE does not like. The line
of code for this item is very straightforward and is:

<td align="center"><span id="tree_011170" class="fakelink"
onclick="showFamilyTree(this,'parent_011170')">Sho w Tree</span></td>

Finally, I also changed the code (for this debugging) so that for this
particular item it wrote directly:

<td align="center"><span id="tree_011170" class="fakelink"
onclick="alert('click works')">Show Tree</span></td>

Still nothing.

Once again, this all works perfectly in Firefox.
BTW: I also found out something interesting about the Toolbar in doing
all of this. I did some operations after setting the onclick in the
Toolbar as above that caused a re-rendering of the page with new
innerHTML. The onclick did not change back to the function, but stayed
at a straight alert -- even though the innerHTML rewrote the line to
call the function.

Again: Error reporting in your IE is turned on? You have do that
*explicitly* in the settings dialog.
It is turned on. I had already unchecked the "Disable Script Debugging
(Internet Explorer)" after your first reply.
>
Gregor


Jun 27 '08 #15

P: n/a
On Apr 29, 8:19*am, sheldonlg <sheldonlgwrote:
Gregor Kofler wrote:
sheldonlg meinte:
Uh, no. *Everything works fine in Firefox. *It is a simple "onClick".
It is "onclick", BTW.
Anyway, you state that
<clickableelement onclick="foo()">
<script type="text/javascript">
function foo() { alert ("bar!"); }
</script>
is not working in IE? Impossible. Have you tried
<clickableelement onclick="alert('bar!')">

In the Developer Toolbar, on the element that does the clicking (span
id=tree_011170), I have in the attribute area:

class * * * * * fakelink
id * * * * * * *tree_011170
onclick * * * * showFamilyTree(this, 'parent_011170')

I edited the attribute to be:
onclick * * * * alert('click works')

I then clicked the item and it did not alert. *The problem is not in the
class fakelink because another clickable item (right after it) uses the
same class and it works. *Both those items are within spans that have
the class fakelink attached to them. *(fakelink is a class that makes it
look like a link). Just for the hell of it, I turned off pop-up blocker
and it made no difference. *Also, another control that I was looking at
calls a javascript that has alerts and it alerts properly. *There is
something about THIS particular control that IE does not like. *The line
* of code for this item is very straightforward and is:

<td align="center"><span id="tree_011170" class="fakelink"
* *onclick="showFamilyTree(this,'parent_011170')">Sh ow Tree</span></td>

Finally, I also changed the code (for this debugging) so that for this
particular item it wrote directly:

<td align="center"><span id="tree_011170" class="fakelink"
* * onclick="alert('click works')">Show Tree</span></td>

Still nothing.

Once again, this all works perfectly in Firefox.
The following works for me in both FF3b5 and IE7:

<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
<table>
<tr>
<td align="center"><span id="tree_011170"
onclick="alert('click works')">Show Tree</span></td>
</tr>
</table>
</body>
</html>

So therefore the error must be something else.
Jun 27 '08 #16

P: n/a
Scripsit Gregor Kofler:
>Uh, no. Everything works fine in Firefox. It is a simple "onClick".

It is "onclick", BTW.
It's oNcLiCk or ONCLICK or ONcliCK or any other combination of lowercase
and uppercase, by HTML rules. So onClick works just as fine.

In XHTML, it must be in lowercase, though. On the other hand, if you
spell it differently, a markup validator reports an error. And in any
problem involving HTML, markup validation should be among the first
steps.

--
Jukka K. Korpela ("Yucca")
http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/

Jun 27 '08 #17

P: n/a
sheldonlg wrote:

<snip code snippet garbage>
<td align="center"><span id="tree_011170" class="fakelink"
onclick="alert('click works')">Show Tree</span></td>

Still nothing.

Once again, this all works perfectly in Firefox.
<snip more code snippet garbage>

Obviously you have an error somewhere *other* than what your are showing
in your snippets. If you really want a answer, then stop monkeying
around playing this game of 20-questions and post the URL. Think about
it, if you *do not know* what the problem is then how can you know what
part of your code to put in a snippet!

--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
Jun 27 '08 #18

P: n/a
sheldonlg wrote:
Jonathan N. Little wrote:
>Obviously you have an error somewhere *other* than what your are
showing in your snippets. If you really want a answer, then stop
monkeying around playing this game of 20-questions and post the URL.
Think about it, if you *do not know* what the problem is then how can
you know what part of your code to put in a snippet!

I can't do that. First of all, it is an intranet application and to
access it you would have to login over a VPN. Second of all, it is a
massive application built upon an AJAX framework. A "view page source"
only shows the template. I can see the code in Firebug or outlines of it
in the Developer Toolbar.

I posted those because that is what is failing. Obviously, the error is
coming from somewhere else, since narrowing these down show that these,
by themselves, have to work.
Well if you cannot see the posting a URL at least a demo page that still
exhibits your problem to a public server, well...good luck with that!

--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
Jun 27 '08 #19

P: n/a
Jonathan N. Little wrote:
sheldonlg wrote:
>Jonathan N. Little wrote:
>>Obviously you have an error somewhere *other* than what your are
showing in your snippets. If you really want a answer, then stop
monkeying around playing this game of 20-questions and post the URL.
Think about it, if you *do not know* what the problem is then how can
you know what part of your code to put in a snippet!

I can't do that. First of all, it is an intranet application and to
access it you would have to login over a VPN. Second of all, it is a
massive application built upon an AJAX framework. A "view page
source" only shows the template. I can see the code in Firebug or
outlines of it in the Developer Toolbar.

I posted those because that is what is failing. Obviously, the error
is coming from somewhere else, since narrowing these down show that
these, by themselves, have to work.

Well if you cannot see the posting a URL at least a demo page that still
exhibits your problem to a public server, well...good luck with that!
I found the source of my problem. Now I could use a bit of help fixing
it. This application has a few hidden blocks of code that pushing a
button makes visible. They are all specified with a class called
exclude_form_class (which I will show below). I brute forced the
debugging by eliminating everything and putting things back one by one
until it broke again. Those blocks of code broke it. If I omitted the
class specification, then the javascript worked. Here is the class
declaration in the css:

******************************
..exclude_form_class
{
position: fixed;
z-index: 99;
top: 200px;
background-color: rgb(221, 221, 221);
visibility: hidden;
}

* html .exclude_form_class {position:absolute;}

<!--[if lte IE 6]>
html {overflow-x:auto; overflow-y:hidden;}
<![endif]-->
******************************

The intent is to have the block of code come up at roughly the middle of
the screen no matter where we are on the page (which could grow to be
rather large). So, the objective is fix this so that it doesn't affect
anything else, yet works in both browsers appearing in the middle of the
screen. (A javascript function modifies the visibility attribute). I
could use some suggestions here as I am primarily a php/java/etc.
programmer and am a relative newcomer to javascript and css.
Jun 27 '08 #20

P: n/a
Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
Scripsit Gregor Kofler:
>>Uh, no. Everything works fine in Firefox. It is a simple "onClick".
It is "onclick", BTW.

It's oNcLiCk or ONCLICK or ONcliCK or any other combination of lowercase
and uppercase, by HTML rules. So onClick works just as fine.
However, arguments made in favor of all-lowercase element type and attribute
identifiers, and element names and IDs, include less error-proneness and
greater efficiency when using the DOM, better compressibility, and greater
compatibility when switching to XHTML later.
PointedEars
--
Anyone who slaps a 'this page is best viewed with Browser X' label on
a Web page appears to be yearning for the bad old days, before the Web,
when you had very little chance of reading a document written on another
computer, another word processor, or another network. -- Tim Berners-Lee
Jun 27 '08 #21

P: n/a
On Tue, 29 Apr 2008 17:38:47 -0400, sheldonlg wrote:
>
* html .exclude_form_class {position:absolute;}

<!--[if lte IE 6]>
html {overflow-x:auto; overflow-y:hidden;}
<![endif]-->
******************************

Don't know, really, and I can't even say I care enough to check through the
selected semi-snippets of random code you've provided, but maybe this will
interest or even help you, since I gathered your problem was a difference
between IE6 and IE7.

See the page at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb250496.aspx and,
in particular, search for the section headed, "* HTML Filter".

So, IE7 will ignore the positioning rule above. Does that help you any?

--
John
Jun 27 '08 #22

P: n/a

John Hosking wrote:
On Tue, 29 Apr 2008 17:38:47 -0400, sheldonlg wrote:
>* html .exclude_form_class {position:absolute;}

<!--[if lte IE 6]>
html {overflow-x:auto; overflow-y:hidden;}
<![endif]-->

IE7 will ignore the positioning rule above.
Actually, that is probably the desired behavior. position:fixed is the
default rule (which you snipped). IE7 does support position:fixed, so it
should *not* apply the *html rule.

--
Berg
Jun 27 '08 #23

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