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what makes this "slide" bar stay so solid? (never seen before)

P: n/a
Joe
usually slide bars move by "jumps" while scrolling which looks not
nice.
I came accress slide bar with price menu, ewnt through script/web
source code, and could not find anything that would case that wanted
effect :)

here you go:
http://www.shopping.hp.com/webapp/sh...isplay&v1=20.1
click on the left >Recommended config , a menu on the right will
show up, you see you scroll down, menu stays perfectly in the place

just wondering how it was acheieved.

any ideas??
Mar 23 '08 #1
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7 Replies


P: n/a
Joe meinte:
usually slide bars move by "jumps" while scrolling which looks not
nice.
I came accress slide bar with price menu, ewnt through script/web
source code, and could not find anything that would case that wanted
effect :)

here you go:
http://www.shopping.hp.com/webapp/sh...isplay&v1=20.1
click on the left >Recommended config , a menu on the right will
show up, you see you scroll down, menu stays perfectly in the place

just wondering how it was acheieved.
Upon scrolling position: relative is set to position: fixed for for the
div element with id "slider". Firebug helps.
any ideas??
I don't know which JS snippet is responsible for it, and since the
quality of the "code" on this site (like on so many other big corporate
sites) is perhaps even worse than jQuery, I won't bother to search for it.

Gregor

--
http://photo.gregorkofler.at ::: Landschafts- und Reisefotografie
http://web.gregorkofler.com ::: meine JS-Spielwiese
http://www.image2d.com ::: Bildagentur für den alpinen Raum
Mar 23 '08 #2

P: n/a
Joe
On Mar 23, 6:05*am, Gregor Kofler <use...@gregorkofler.atwrote:
Joe meinte:
usually slide bars move by "jumps" while scrolling which looks not
nice.
I came accress slide bar with price menu, ewnt through script/web
source code, and could not find anything that would case that wanted
effect :)
here you go:
http://www.shopping.hp.com/webapp/sh..._series.do?sto...
click on the left >Recommended config , a menu on the right will
show up, you see you scroll down, menu stays perfectly in the place
just wondering how it was acheieved.

Upon scrolling position: relative is set to position: fixed for for the
div element with id "slider". Firebug helps.
any ideas??

I don't know which JS snippet is responsible for it, and since the
quality of the "code" on this site (like on so many other big corporate
sites) is perhaps even worse than jQuery, I won't bother to search for it.

Gregor

--http://photo.gregorkofler.at::: Landschafts- und Reisefotografiehttp://web.gregorkofler.com*::: meine JS-Spielwiesehttp://www.image2d.com* * * ::: Bildagentur für den alpinen Raum
I am looking through IE and it is the same thing - it doesnt jump,
just slide...
Thanks anyways
Mar 23 '08 #3

P: n/a
Gregor Kofler wrote:
>here you go:
http://www.shopping.hp.com/webapp/sh...isplay&v1=20.1

I don't know which JS snippet is responsible for it, and since the
quality of the "code" on this site (like on so many other big corporate
sites) is perhaps even worse than jQuery, I won't bother to search for it.
I don't understand why some people feel the need to needlessly bash
jQuery every time it gets mentioned here.

jQuery is a *great* tool to simplify things which would be tedious at
best with pure javascript. It lowers the bar of creating usable
JavaScript-applications and while you seem to think it's a bad thing I
really can't see what's the harm in that. Sure, it may be fun to create
your own functions and librarys, some might say re-inventing the wheel,
but I really can't see that work being productive in a business sense.

And if the code quality behing jQuery isn't that great, which I'm not
saying it isn't, then so what? It doesn't even really matter to me if
and *when* it takes care of the browser differences in a reliable way
and makes JavaScript actually fun.

I really do not care about the arguments I've read in this newsgroup
where some have been scrutinizing jQuerys source code line by line. I'm
sure there are some parts in every JavaScript code, even in your own,
where people could jump in and point out potential problems. Heck,
pointing out other peoples errors isn't that difficult. Nor is it
productive.

Besides jQuery is getting better and faster after each release and if
and when there are bugs they will be fixed - it's that simple.

If you are really unable to see the benefit of using jQuery - well, then
I guess each of us makes decisions based on different merits, but it
still doesn't make jQuery "crap" even if you don't like it.

All of you who don't really know what this is even about - don't just
eat up the beliefs of some of the regulars but check out jQuery to make
up your own mind - http://jquery.org.

--
Joose Niemi
Mar 23 '08 #4

P: n/a
Joose Niemi wrote:
...check out jQuery to make
up your own mind - http://jquery.org.
Oops - it should have been http://jquery.com

--
Joose Niemi
Mar 23 '08 #5

P: n/a
Joose Niemi meinte:

[jQuery praise snipped]
I really do not care about the arguments I've read in this newsgroup
where some have been scrutinizing jQuerys source code line by line.
So what's your point?
I'm
sure there are some parts in every JavaScript code, even in your own,
where people could jump in and point out potential problems.
Sure. But I'm no "JS evangelist"...
Gregor
--
http://photo.gregorkofler.at ::: Landschafts- und Reisefotografie
http://web.gregorkofler.com ::: meine JS-Spielwiese
http://www.image2d.com ::: Bildagentur für den alpinen Raum
Mar 23 '08 #6

P: n/a
Gregor Kofler wrote:
Joose Niemi meinte:

[jQuery praise snipped]
>I really do not care about the arguments I've read in this newsgroup
where some have been scrutinizing jQuerys source code line by line.

So what's your point?
I guess my point was that while the code may not be perfect it still
brings an obvious productivity boost for a common developer like myself.

Those are two different things - one being the internal code quality and
the other being productivity - and I don't understand how and why the
former cancels the latter.
>I'm sure there are some parts in every JavaScript code, even in your
own, where people could jump in and point out potential problems.

Sure. But I'm no "JS evangelist"...
So I guess you're referring to John Resig who is the lead-developer
behind jQuery.

Isn't an evangelist defined as a person who enthusiastically promotes or
supports something? So such persons are not allowed to make mistakes,
and if they do it automatically invalidates all projects they have been
working on for a long time? That just doesn't seem very fair to me.

--
Joose Niemi
Mar 23 '08 #7

P: n/a
Joe
On Mar 23, 7:06*pm, Joose Niemi <jooseNOS...@kolumbus.fi.invalid>
wrote:
Gregor Kofler wrote:
Joose Niemi meinte:
[jQuery praise snipped]
I really do not care about the arguments I've read in this newsgroup
where some have been scrutinizing jQuerys source code line by line.
So what's your point?

I guess my point was that while the code may not be perfect it still
brings an obvious productivity boost for a common developer like myself.

Those are two different things - one being the internal code quality and
the other being productivity - and I don't understand how and why the
former cancels the latter.
I'm sure there are some parts in every JavaScript code, even in your
own, where people could jump in and point out potential problems.
Sure. But I'm no "JS evangelist"...

So I guess you're referring to John Resig who is the lead-developer
behind jQuery.

Isn't an evangelist defined as a person who enthusiastically promotes or
supports something? So such persons are not allowed to make mistakes,
and if they do it automatically invalidates all projects they have been
working on for a long time? That just doesn't seem very fair to me.

--
Joose Niemi
Jose, thanks for wiriting under different subject... (can you at least
read posts subjects??)

Mar 23 '08 #8

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