By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
435,089 Members | 2,069 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 435,089 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

Javascript or Java ?

P: n/a
I have done one Javascript project. It ended up with 1000 lines of code. The
next one will be 10-20 times as big and my question is whether I should
switch to Java.

I have always programmed in Pascal, the last 10 years using Delphi. (And I
will stick with that for non-web based applications.) What I missed most in
the Javascript project was a good development environment with integrated
debugger. So, an important part of the question about Javascript/Java is
about the ease of development when the project gets bigger. Is there a good
environment for Javascript? And what other considerations would you have?

Kind regards,
Tom
Feb 4 '08 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
7 Replies


P: n/a
On Feb 4, 9:44*am, "Tom de Neef" <tden...@qolor.nlwrote:
debugger. So, an important part of the question about Javascript/Java is
about the ease of development when the project gets bigger. Is there a good
environment for Javascript? And what other considerations would you have?
To develop Java you have several good IDEs such as Eclipse. To code
Javascript you can use any text editor with code highlighting but you
will always have to test in several browsers (IE7, IE6, Opera, Firefox
or Seamonkey, Safari or Konqueror). Javascript is definitely better
than using a Java applet. Who in this room has JRE installed on his
computer, in the first place? :)
Feb 4 '08 #2

P: n/a
Charles wrote:
Who in this room has JRE installed on his
computer, in the first place? :)
Not sure. How many people are in your room ?
Feb 4 '08 #3

P: n/a
Tom de Neef wrote:
I have done one Javascript project. It ended up with 1000 lines of code.
The next one will be 10-20 times as big and my question is whether I
should switch to Java.
Rule of thumb: use the right language for the right purpose.
[...] What I missed most in the Javascript project was a good development
environment with integrated debugger.
I'd say Eclipse's AJAX Tools Framework (ATF) from the Web Tools Platform
(WTP) Project is quite good in that. What's more, it's open source and
for free.

http://www.eclipse.org/projects/proj...d=webtools.atf
PointedEars
--
var bugRiddenCrashPronePieceOfJunk = (
navigator.userAgent.indexOf('MSIE 5') != -1
&& navigator.userAgent.indexOf('Mac') != -1
) // Plone, register_function.js:16
Feb 4 '08 #4

P: n/a
On Mon, 04 Feb 2008 20:12:18 +0100, Tom de Neef wrote:
"MikeB" <m.byerleyATVerizonDottieNettieschreef in bericht
>The Host, Mshta.exe is basically a stripped down IE without all the
security stuff for WAN interaction.

Is it then restricted to Windows?
Tom

Yes, HTAs are a MS Windows only beast -- that is explained on one of the
links given above.

http://www.c-point.com/javascript_tu...plications.htm

Based on what I understand, you should be able to write the whole thing
in a cross-platform JS without too much work. It will load in a browser
window and run in a browser window, but it could be downloaded and run
offline (if that is something your user-base needs.)

If it must look like a real program (instead of inside a browser) and you
can live with IE only, then you can create an HTA.

I'd agree with most of the folks here and try to avoid Java. Seems like
so few people have a (good) Java plugin on their machines. In addition,
the content could not be saved and used offline easily. (This may be an
advantage, depending.)

Feb 4 '08 #5

P: n/a
On Mon, 04 Feb 2008 23:09:33 +0100, Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:
Windows and Windows emulators. The open-source free-software
alternative for HTA is XUL, which does not have that restriction.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XUL
http://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/XUL

I've heard of XUL before but I've not really looked into it much.

The examples that I see make it look like quite a different language and
setup all together that would make it less attractive than re-using an
existing skillset.

< URL: http://www.xulplanet.com/tutorials/x...l_child-cross-
grid.html >

Or is this a whole different same-named beast?

Feb 5 '08 #6

P: n/a
Jeremy J Starcher wrote:
On Mon, 04 Feb 2008 23:09:33 +0100, Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:
>Windows and Windows emulators. The open-source free-software
alternative for HTA is XUL, which does not have that restriction.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XUL
http://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/XUL

I've heard of XUL before but I've not really looked into it much.

The examples that I see make it look like quite a different language and
In short, XUL is XML-based CSS-formatted markup that defines the
look of the interface, and JavaScript to define its functionality.
setup all together that would make it less attractive than re-using an
existing skillset.

< URL: http://www.xulplanet.com/tutorials/x...l_child-cross-
grid.html >

Or is this a whole different same-named beast?
It is one dim view at what XUL can do, which is best demonstrated by
applications that are built on it, such as Mozilla Firefox and
Thunderbird. Try the DOM Inspector add-on on them, and you will see.
PointedEars
--
var bugRiddenCrashPronePieceOfJunk = (
navigator.userAgent.indexOf('MSIE 5') != -1
&& navigator.userAgent.indexOf('Mac') != -1
) // Plone, register_function.js:16
Feb 5 '08 #7

P: n/a
Thank you all very much.
I will stick to Javascript and install some tools.
Tom
Feb 5 '08 #8

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.