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Local Area Network (LAN)

Local Area Network (LAN)

Both an EtherNet (wire) network and a wireless network are referred to
as a Local Area Network (LAN). A wireless network does not require
hubs, switchers, or routers to include additional users on the
network. Additional wireless users are supported just by being in the
immediate physical span of the network.

A wireless LAN (or Wi-Fi network) may be configured in two different
ways:

Ad Hoc mode: Allows only for communication between different personal
computers and wireless devices, often referred to as peer-to-peer
communication.
Infrastructure mode: Required for communication with the World Wide
Web, a printer, or a wired device of any sort. In either case, this
wireless connection requires a wireless network adaptor, often called
a WLAN card.
http://www.askstar.com.cn/health/Ins...chnologies.htm

Nov 6 '07 #1
3 2349
anganb wrote:
Local Area Network (LAN)

Both an EtherNet (wire) network and a wireless network are referred to
as a Local Area Network (LAN). A wireless network does not require
hubs, switchers, or routers to include additional users on the
network.
An ethernet LAN des not require hubs routers or switches either.

Additional wireless users are supported just by being in the
immediate physical span of the network.
Ditto ethernet, but I doubt yu can remember back that far..
A wireless LAN (or Wi-Fi network) may be configured in two different
ways:

Ad Hoc mode: Allows only for communication between different personal
computers and wireless devices, often referred to as peer-to-peer
communication.
Infrastructure mode: Required for communication with the World Wide
Web, a printer, or a wired device of any sort. In either case, this
wireless connection requires a wireless network adaptor, often called
a WLAN card.
http://www.askstar.com.cn/health/Ins...chnologies.htm
Seems like you are talking more or less nonsense for reasons I can't
fathom.

What is your point?
Nov 6 '07 #2
On Tue, 06 Nov 2007 00:42:57 -0800, anganb wrote:
A wireless network does not require hubs, switchers, or routers to
include additional users on the network. Additional wireless users are
supported just by being in the immediate physical span of the network.
This is not accurate. Your wireless access point is, in fact, a hub or
switch. A wireless access point supports a specific number of concurrent
connections... either based on licensing or, at the very least, the
capacity of the ARP table.

--
I told you this was going to happen.

Nov 6 '07 #3
Ivan Marsh wrote:
On Tue, 06 Nov 2007 00:42:57 -0800, anganb wrote:
>A wireless network does not require hubs, switchers, or routers to
include additional users on the network. Additional wireless users are
supported just by being in the immediate physical span of the network.

This is not accurate. Your wireless access point is, in fact, a hub or
switch. A wireless access point supports a specific number of concurrent
connections... either based on licensing or, at the very least, the
capacity of the ARP table.
Good point. So basically nothing in the OP is correct?

Nov 6 '07 #4

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