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FAQ Topic - What is ECMAScript?

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FAQ Topic - What is ECMAScript?
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http://www.ecma-international.org/pu...s/Ecma-262.htm

ECMAScript is the international standard for javascript. JScript
3.0 and JavaScript 1.2 (available with version 4. browsers) are
more or less ECMAScript compliant. In addition ECMA 327 defines
the Compact Profile of ECMAScript by describing the features from
ECMA 262 that may be omitted in some resource-constrained
environments. Note that ECMAScript did not attempt to standardize
the document object model.

The current edition is ECMA-262, 3rd Edition. There is some
support for this edition in JScript 5.0 and JavaScript 1.3.
JScript 5.5 and JavaScript 1.5, in Netscape 6.1 and later, are
compliant (JavaScript 1.5 in Netscape 6 missed some methods).
===
Postings such as this are automatically sent once a day. Their
goal is to answer repeated questions, and to offer the content to
the community for continuous evaluation/improvement. The complete
comp.lang.javascript FAQ is at http://www.jibbering.com/faq/.
The FAQ workers are a group of volunteers.

Jan 28 '07 #1
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In comp.lang.javascript message <45***********************@news.sunsite.
dk>, Sun, 28 Jan 2007 00:00:01, FAQ server <ja********@dotinternet.be>
posted:
>FAQ Topic - What is ECMAScript?
>http://www.ecma-international.org/pu...s/Ecma-262.htm
And the URL for the Errata?
>ECMAScript is the international standard for javascript.
No; ECMAScript is a multinational standard. We now know that the
International Standard is ISO/IEC 16262, which should additionally be
cited. Only in the USA does "international" mean "foreign".
JScript
3.0 and JavaScript 1.2 (available with version 4. browsers) are
Are version 4 browsers readily available now? " ... became available".
>more or less ECMAScript compliant.
>The current edition is ECMA-262, 3rd Edition. There is some
support for this edition in JScript 5.0 and JavaScript 1.3.
JScript 5.5 and JavaScript 1.5, in Netscape 6.1 and later, are
compliant (JavaScript 1.5 in Netscape 6 missed some methods).
While JScript implies Microsoft, but not necessarily MSIE, ISTM that as
another browser is mentioned the commonest should also be mentioned -
and so should one or two of the best.

Probably worth mentioning that not everything in JScript is in fact in
ECMA.

--
(c) John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v6.05 MIME.
Web <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/- FAQqish topics, acronyms & links;
Astro stuff via astron-1.htm, gravity0.htm ; quotings.htm, pascal.htm, etc.
Remember March 3rd, if Math.abs(longitude) is not too great.
Jan 28 '07 #2

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Dr J R Stockton said the following on 1/28/2007 2:38 PM:
In comp.lang.javascript message <45***********************@news.sunsite.
dk>, Sun, 28 Jan 2007 00:00:01, FAQ server <ja********@dotinternet.be>
posted:
>FAQ Topic - What is ECMAScript?
>http://www.ecma-international.org/pu...s/Ecma-262.htm
And the URL for the Errata?
You find it and I will add it.
>ECMAScript is the international standard for javascript.

No; ECMAScript is a multinational standard.
ECMAScript is an international standard.
We now know that the International Standard is ISO/IEC 16262,
which should additionally be cited.
We do? I have never seen anything that says ISO/IEC 16262 is "the
International Standard" other than you claiming it to be.
Only in the USA does "international" mean "foreign".
Only in your mind does it mean that in the USA.
>JScript
3.0 and JavaScript 1.2 (available with version 4. browsers) are

Are version 4 browsers readily available now? " ... became available".
>more or less ECMAScript compliant.
>The current edition is ECMA-262, 3rd Edition. There is some
support for this edition in JScript 5.0 and JavaScript 1.3.
JScript 5.5 and JavaScript 1.5, in Netscape 6.1 and later, are
compliant (JavaScript 1.5 in Netscape 6 missed some methods).

While JScript implies Microsoft, but not necessarily MSIE, ISTM that as
another browser is mentioned the commonest should also be mentioned -
and so should one or two of the best.
The reference to Netscape should be changed to Mozilla or similar. As
for "one or two of the best", that is way too subjective to even
contemplate.
Probably worth mentioning that not everything in JScript is in fact in
ECMA.
And then you have to mention that not everything in Javascript is in
fact in ECMA. And then not everything in ECMA is in Javascript nor is it
in JScript. And then you end up with a book that will take 2 hours to
download instead of a short FAQ document.

--
Randy
Chance Favors The Prepared Mind
comp.lang.javascript FAQ - http://jibbering.com/faq/index.html
Javascript Best Practices - http://www.JavascriptToolbox.com/bestpractices/
Feb 6 '07 #3

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In comp.lang.javascript message <P-********************@telcove.net>,
Tue, 6 Feb 2007 12:30:59, Randy Webb <Hi************@aol.composted:
>Dr J R Stockton said the following on 1/28/2007 2:38 PM:
>In comp.lang.javascript message <45***********************@news.sunsite.
dk>, Sun, 28 Jan 2007 00:00:01, FAQ server <ja********@dotinternet.be>
posted:
>>FAQ Topic - What is ECMAScript?
>>http://www.ecma-international.org/pu...tandards/Ecma-
262.htm
And the URL for the Errata?

You find it and I will add it.
I found it a while ago, and I put it in the appropriate place in my Web
site.

Google for ECMA-262 Errata; the fourth entry, <http://interglacial.com/j
avascript_spec/00cover.htmlis evidently germane; it links to
<http://www.mozilla.org/js/language/E262-3-errata.html>. "Previous"
from 00cover.html gives index.html, which says

Previous ToC Index Next

ECMAScript Language Specification
(HTML version)
* Cover page
* Table of Contents
* Index
* Download a zip file of all of this
* All of this as one big HTML file
* (Errata, at mozilla.org)

the last 6 lines being links. We ought to have known about this; more
local search tools can be used on HTML than on PDF, and it's easier to
quote from.
>>ECMAScript is the international standard for javascript.
No; ECMAScript is a multinational standard.

ECMAScript is an international standard.
European is not International, only (for the moment) multinational.
>We now know that the International Standard is ISO/IEC 16262, which
should additionally be cited.

We do? I have never seen anything that says ISO/IEC 16262 is "the
International Standard" other than you claiming it to be.
Perhaps you have failed to notice that "ISO/IEC" includes two instances
of "I". The role of ISO is explained in <http://www.iso.org/>. Don't
bother with any wrong IEC; the right one is www.iec.ch.

Page <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ECMAScriptsays that 262 was changed
for alignment with 16262, implying 16262's superior authority.

Then, of course, ECMA-262 (PDF) itself, in "Brief History" paragraph 3,
makes it rather clear.

Quoting from the full HTML of 262, by copy'n'paste,

That ECMA Standard was submitted to ISO/IEC JTC 1 for adoption
under the fast-track procedure, and approved as international
standard ISO/IEC 16262, in April 1998. The ECMA General Assembly
of June 1998 approved the second edition of ECMA-262 to keep it
fully aligned with ISO/IEC 16262. Changes between the first and
the second edition are editorial in nature.

Perhaps you've not looked very much.

>>as
another browser is mentioned the commonest should also be mentioned -
and so should one or two of the best.

The reference to Netscape should be changed to Mozilla or similar. As
for "one or two of the best", that is way too subjective to even
contemplate.
Then take the advice of the group, noting that "one or two of the best"
does not mean "the best one or two". From what I've read here, Firefox
must be a candidate, and Opera may be.

--
(c) John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Delphi 3? Turnpike 6.05
<URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/TP/BP/Delphi/&c., FAQqy topics & links;
<URL:http://www.bancoems.com/CompLangPascalDelphiMisc-MiniFAQ.htmclpdmFAQ;
<URL:http://www.borland.com/newsgroups/guide.htmlnews:borland.* Guidelines
Feb 7 '07 #4

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In article <fr**************@invalid.uk.co.demon.merlyn.inval id>, Dr J R
Stockton <re*******@merlyn.demon.co.ukwrites
>In comp.lang.javascript message <P-********************@telcove.net>,
Tue, 6 Feb 2007 12:30:59, Randy Webb <Hi************@aol.composted:
<snip>
>>ECMAScript is an international standard.

European is not International, only (for the moment) multinational.
"ECMA" is no longer an acronym, says ECMA. Nowadays it doesn't care
which country an aspiring member comes from.

If it matters, which it seems to do here, I would say that it's
legitimate to say that ECMA 262 is "an" international standard. It's
also legitimate to say that "the" international standard is the ISO
document when there is one (which there is for ECMAScript).

>>We now know that the International Standard is ISO/IEC 16262, which
should additionally be cited.

We do? I have never seen anything that says ISO/IEC 16262 is "the
International Standard" other than you claiming it to be.
<snip>

Of course JS could have avoided argument by saying that the ISO web site
lists ISO/IEC 16262. It's title is
"Information technology - ECMAScript language specification".

The web site is at <URL:http://www.iso.org/>

John
--
John Harris
Feb 7 '07 #5

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In comp.lang.javascript message <hl**************@jgharris.demon.co.uk.n
ospam.invalid>, Wed, 7 Feb 2007 21:00:09, John G Harris
<jo**@nospam.demon.co.ukposted:
>Of course JS could have avoided argument by saying that the ISO web site
lists ISO/IEC 16262. It's title is
"Information technology - ECMAScript language specification".
(1) JS is javascript. My initials are obvious enough.
(2) But I'd not visited the ISO site lately. The ECMA page, and ECMA-
262 itself, give the ISO reference.

Change to OT :
Would someone with Vista (or a non-MS browser that handles VBScript, if
any) kindly look at <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/vb-date2.htm#WN>
with it, to see whether week numbers given by DatePart are different in
Vista?

--
(c) John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v6.05 IE 6.
Web <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/- w. FAQish topics, links, acronyms
PAS EXE etc : <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/programs/- see 00index.htm
Dates - miscdate.htm moredate.htm js-dates.htm pas-time.htm critdate.htm etc.
Feb 8 '07 #6

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